Zaha Hadid Design Creates Shoe and Transparent Clutch Bag for Charlotte Olympia

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Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Design Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Design This week, Zaha Hadid Design released a new platform wedge shoe and accompanying clutch bag with British shoe and accessory brand Charlotte Olympia. The limited edition pieces, which sport the familiar flowing forms perfected by Hadid in her architecture, are both constructed using a combination of transparent perspex and rose gold accents.
Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Design Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Design

The collaboration between Hadid and Charlotte Olympia began in 2015 but was interrupted by Hadid's death last year. "Zaha Hadid Design and Charlotte Olympia have meticulously realized these pieces as Zaha originally envisioned," said the design team in a press release.

Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Design Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Design

"Zaha Hadid was a phenomenal person to have known and her work and aesthetic are constant sources of inspiration for me," said Charlotte Olympia Dellal, the founder of the Charlotte Olympia brand. "It was an honor and privilege to have worked with her and to

Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Design
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Self-Driving Bus in Las Vegas Crashes Just 2 Hours After Launch

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Image via screenshot from video © Keolis Commuter Services Image via screenshot from video © Keolis Commuter Services The drive to introduce autonomous vehicles to the roads took a blow yesterday, when a self-driving shuttle bus in Las Vegas was involved in a minor collision with a truck—just 2 hours into the vehicle's first day of operations. The bus, a 12-seat Navya Arma, was on the first day a 12-month trial covering a 0.6-mile (1-kilometer) loop in Las Vegas' Fremont East “Innovation District” when it was grazed by a reversing truck. In a blog post by the city of Las Vegas, the blame was placed on the driver of the truck, who was cited by city officials for illegal backing. However, according to The Guardian, passengers at the time said the crash could have been avoided if the shuttle had simply backed out of the truck's way.
"The shuttle did what it was supposed to do,
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Tiffany’s Just Released a $1,275 Set of Drawing Tools for All The Stinking Rich Architects Out There

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via Tiffany & Co via Tiffany & Co As architects, we've all been there: the payment for your most recent completed building comes through, and as you look around, you realize you have nothing left to spend the money on. Your subscriptions for all of your extortionately priced software are paid; you've bought all the latest trendy gadgets; your costly sartorial tastes are satisfied; and of course, you're living in a cool, spacious house of your own design. What does the architect who has everything do with their money? There's only so many bottles of wine you can send to the high school guidance counselor who introduced you to your lucrative career. But fear not! As part of their new "Everyday Objects" range, Tiffany & Co has released a set of basic drawing tools that, purchased together, will relieve you of $1,275 in unwanted cash.
via Tiffany & Co via Tiffany & Co

The ruler ($450), protractor ($425), and set

via Tiffany & Co
via Tiffany & Co
via Tiffany & Co
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Spotlight: Paulo Mendes da Rocha

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Museu Brasileiro de Escultura (MuBE). Image © Paul Clemence Museu Brasileiro de Escultura (MuBE). Image © Paul Clemence
All space must be attached to a value, to a public dimension. There is no private space. The only private space that you can imagine is the human mind.
Paulo Mendes da Rocha, May 26, 2004

Paulo Mendes da Rocha is one of Brazil's greatest architects and urbanists. Born in Vitória, Espírito Santo in 1928, Mendes da Rocha won the 2006 Pritzker Prize, and is one of the most representative architects of the Brazilian Paulista School, also known as "Paulista Brutalism" that utilizes more geometric lines, rougher finishes and bulkier massing than other Brazilian Modernists such as Oscar Niemeyer.

Courtesy of the Paulo Mendes da Rocha Archive Courtesy of the Paulo Mendes da Rocha Archive

Mendes da Rocha's interest in Latin American Modernism began early in his career, while he was studying at the Mackenzie Prysbyterian University of São Paulo. One of his earliest buildings is a testament to this:

Cais das Artes. Image Courtesy of Paulo Mendes da Rocha
New Leme Gallery. Image © Leonardo Finotti
Museu dos Coches. Image © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG
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MVRDV and SDK Vastgoed Selected to Design Sustainable Housing Complex in Eindhoven

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© MVRDV © MVRDV

MVDRV and SDK Vastgoed (VolkerWessels) have been selected as winners in a competition to design a “progressive residential development” in inner-city Eindhoven, The Netherlands. Known as “Nieuw Bergen”, the complex will offer high-quality, sustainable residences along Deken van Someren Street, helping to establish a “visible sustainability ethos” in the neighborhood of Bergen.

© MVRDV © MVRDV

The structure derives its form from datum planes drawn at a 45 degree angle from the footprint of neighboring residential buildings – a move that both allows an abundance of natural light to reach even ground floor spaces and creates an irregular, jagged profile that refers to the silhouettes of traditional pitched roofs. Embracing environmental-driven design, the complex has been designed with passive sustainable strategies, while solar panels take advantage of the oblique roof planes to optimally orient toward the sun. This concept is an evolution of the urban strategy tool MVRDV has

Concept diagram. Image © MVRDV
Overview diagram. Image © MVRDV
© MVRDV
Concept diagram. Image © MVRDV
© MVRDV
Plan diagrams. Image © MVRDV
© MVRDV
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Spotlight: Philip Johnson

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The Glass House. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbschlemmer/7468240258'>Flickr user mbschlemmer</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> The Glass House. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbschlemmer/7468240258'>Flickr user mbschlemmer</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> When he was awarded the first ever Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1979, the jury described Philip Johnson (July 8, 1906 – January 25, 2005) as someone who “produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the environment," adding that "as a critic and historian, he championed the cause of modern architecture and then went on to design some of his greatest buildings.” However, even after winning the Pritzker Prize at age 73, Johnson still had so much more of his legacy to build: in the years after 1979, Johnson almost completely redefined his style, adding another chapter to his influence over the architecture world.
© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Philip_Johnson.2002.FILARDO.jpg'>B. Pietro Filardo (Wikimedia user Bpfilardo)</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Philip_Johnson.2002.FILARDO.jpg'>B. Pietro Filardo (Wikimedia user Bpfilardo)</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>

Born in

The Glass House. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbschlemmer/7468236748'>Flickr user mbschlemmer</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
The Crystal Cathedral. Image Courtesy of American Seating
AT&T Building. Image © David Shankbone
From left: Andy Warhol, David Whitney, Philip Johnson, Dr. John Dalton, and Robert A. M. Stern in the Glass House in 1964. Image © David McCabe
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Spotlight: Paolo Soleri

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Arcosanti. Image © Tomiaki Tamura Arcosanti. Image © Tomiaki Tamura Italian-American architect Paolo Soleri (21 June 1919 – 9 April 2013) made his name as a countercultural icon and urban visionary, best known for his theory of "arcology"—a combination of architecture and ecology—and for Arcosanti, the prototype town in the Arizona desert which embodied his ideals and became his life's work, which he founded in 1970 and continued to work on right up until his death in 2013.
screenshot from David Licata's documentary "A Life's Work" screenshot from David Licata's documentary "A Life's Work"
Panoramic view of Arcosanti. Image © Ken Howie Panoramic view of Arcosanti. Image © Ken Howie

Born in Turin, Italy, Soleri gained his master's degree from the Politecnico di Torino in 1946, traveling to the USA shortly afterward to study under Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin. In 1948, Soleri gained international attention after his design for the "Beast Bridge" was included in Elizabeth Mock's book "The Architecture of Bridges," published by the Museum of Modern Art.

Soleri with a model of his "Beast Bridge" design. Image © Cosanti Foundation Soleri
<a href='https://arcosanti.org/'>via arcosanti.org</a>. ImageArcosanti
<a href='https://arcosanti.org/'>via arcosanti.org</a>. ImageSectional view of Soleri's 2001 design for a completed version of Arcosanti, entitled "Arcosanti 5000"
<a href='https://arcosanti.org/'>via arcosanti.org</a>. ImageArcosanti
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Open Call: The Best Student Design-Build Projects

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It's graduation time. As universities around the globe—or at least most in the Northern hemisphere, where over 80% of the world's universities are located—come to the end of the academic year, many university architecture studios have recently closed out the construction of pavilions, installations, and other small educational projects. For the third straight yearArchDaily is calling on recently-graduated readers to submit their projects for our round-up of the best pavilions, installations and experimental structures created by students from all over the world. Once again, we're teaming up with all of ArchDaily en Español, ArchDaily Brasil, and ArchDaily China, in the hope that we can present the best work from graduating students worldwide to a worldwide audience. Read on to find out how you can take part. Please use the form below to submit a Google Drive Folder containing images and a brief description of your project. Submissions close
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“Inspirational” Frank Lloyd Wright Quotes for Every Occasion

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It's no secret that Frank Lloyd Wright was among the architecture profession's more colorful characters. Known as an outspoken and often unforgiving egotist, Wright's appreciation of architecture was outshone only by his appreciation for himself—which is perhaps understandable, given that he ranks among the 20th century's great geniuses. For better or worse (probably worse), Wright's reputation has clung to the profession, thanks in large part to Ayn Rand, who used Wright as inspiration for the incorrigible lead character of one of her most famous books, The Fountainhead. But in truth, most architects have at least a little of Frank Lloyd Wright's personality contained within their own. It's difficult to have self-confidence without a shred of ego, and since design requires a lot of self-confidence, many of us can relate—if only occasionally—to the outrageous attitude of The United States' greatest architect. In honor of Frank Lloyd Wright's 150th birthday today, we've
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Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright

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Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy In 1991, the American Institute of Architects called him, quite simply, “the greatest American architect of all time.” Over his lifetime, Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) completed more than 500 architectural works; many of them are considered masterpieces. Thanks to the wide dissemination of his designs and his many years spent teaching at the school he founded, few architects in history can claim to have inspired more young people into joining the architecture profession.
Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frank_Lloyd_Wright_portrait.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a>. Photograph by Al Ravenna in the public domain. Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frank_Lloyd_Wright_portrait.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a>. Photograph by Al Ravenna in the public domain.

Wright is particularly interesting because of the unique period in history which he occupied: as a disciple of Louis Sullivan ("form follows function") in the late 19th century, his work forms something of a bridge between the traditional architecture of that era and the modernists which began to appear

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/132084522@N05/17207156426'>Flickr user Sam valadi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Taliesin West. Image © <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:TaliesinWest2010.JPG'>Wikimedia user AndrewHorne</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a>
Frederick C. Robie House. Image © Nat Hansen
Marin Civic Center. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/joevare/3506611084'>Flickr user joevare</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>
Wingspread. Image © Galen Frysinger
Ennis House. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ennis_House_front_view_2005.jpg'>Wikimedia user Mike Dillon</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
SC Johnson Wax Research Tower. Image © SC Johnson
Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy
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Spotlight: Carlo Scarpa

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Museo Castelvecchio. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/andreaosti/4505639981/'>Flickr user andreaosti</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Museo Castelvecchio. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/andreaosti/4505639981/'>Flickr user andreaosti</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> One of the most enigmatic and underappreciated architects of the 20th century, Carlo Scarpa (June 2, 1906 – November 28, 1978) is best known for his instinctive approach to materials, combining time-honored crafts with modern manufacturing processes. In a 1996 documentary directed by Murray Grigor, Egle Trincanato, the President of the Fondazione Querini Stampalia for whom Scarpa renovated a Venetian palace in 1963, described how "above all, he was exceptionally skillful in knowing how to combine a base material with a precious one."
Carlo Scarpa studying drawings by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1954. Image © Mario De Biasi (public domain) Carlo Scarpa studying drawings by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1954. Image © Mario De Biasi (public domain)
Museo Castelvecchio. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/leonl/6121652268/'>Flickr user leonl</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Museo Castelvecchio. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/leonl/6121652268/'>Flickr user leonl</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>

Born in Venice, Scarpa spent most of his early childhood in

Central Pavilion in the Giardini at the Venice Biennale. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/10160349164/'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Garden at the Querini Stampalia. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/8142985275'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Olivetti Showroom. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/8068024216'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Olivetti Showroom. Image © ORCH_chemollo
Brion Tomb and Sanctuary. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/leonl/6106113845/'>Flickr user leonl</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Brion Tomb and Sanctuary. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/batintherain/8192243875'>Flickr user batintherain</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
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Google Unveils Images of its New BIG and Heatherwick-Designed London Campus

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Courtesy of Google Courtesy of Google Google has submitted the design for its new London office to Camden Council for planning approval. Designed by BIG and Heatherwick Studio, the 11-story "groundscraper" design will be located in King's Cross, and will combine with their existing office at 6 Pancras Square and a third, forthcoming building to create a campus for up to 7,000 Google employees.
Courtesy of Google Courtesy of Google

The images released show a design comprised of stacked layers with shifting heights and protrusions across the long, low-slung building. Materials for the building will be sourced through Google's healthy materials program. The design is a very different take on a campus for the tech giant than the tent-like design proposed by the same design team for Google's Campus in Mountain View, California.

Courtesy of Google Courtesy of Google

"As my home and the home of my studio for more than 15 years, I have a close relationship with King’s Cross," said Thomas Heatherwick.

Courtesy of Google
Courtesy of Google
Continue reading "Google Unveils Images of its New BIG and Heatherwick-Designed London Campus"

Google Unveils Images of its New BIG and Heatherwick-Designed London Campus

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Courtesy of Google Courtesy of Google Google has submitted the design for its new London office to Camden Council for planning approval. Designed by BIG and Heatherwick Studio, the 11-story "groundscraper" design will be located in King's Cross, and will combine with their existing office at 6 Pancras Square and a third, forthcoming building to create a campus for up to 7,000 Google employees.
Courtesy of Google Courtesy of Google

The images released show a design comprised of stacked layers with shifting heights and protrusions across the long, low-slung building. Materials for the building will be sourced through Google's healthy materials program. The design is a very different take on a campus for the tech giant than the tent-like design proposed by the same design team for Google's Campus in Mountain View, California.

Courtesy of Google Courtesy of Google

"As my home and the home of my studio for more than 15 years, I have a close relationship with King’s Cross," said Thomas Heatherwick.

Courtesy of Google
Courtesy of Google
Continue reading "Google Unveils Images of its New BIG and Heatherwick-Designed London Campus"

Spotlight: Norman Foster

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Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young Arguably the leading name of a generation of internationally high-profile British architects, Norman Foster (born 1 June 1935)—or to give him his full title Norman Robert Foster, Baron Foster of Thames Bank of Reddish, OM, HonFREng—gained recognition as early as the 1970s as a key architect in the high-tech movement, which continues to have a profound impact on architecture as we know it today.

Foster's architecture is remarkably diverse; he has designed skyscrapers, offices, galleries, airports, stadiums, parliament buildings, city masterplans and even a spaceport. Yet his work is unified by one theme, identified in the jury citation for his 1999 Pritzker Prize: "from his very first projects, it was evident that he would embrace the most advanced technology appropriate to the task." It is this devotion to the latest architectural technology that earned him his place in the High-Tech movement, with buildings

Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank. Image © Wikimedia user WiNG licensed under CC BY 3.0
Masdar Institute. Image © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners
Hearst Tower. Image © Chuck Choi
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Spotlight: Toyo Ito

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Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu As one of the leading architects of Japan's increasingly highly-regarded architecture culture, 2013 Pritzker Laureate Toyo Ito (born June 1, 1941) has defined his career by combining elements of minimalism with an embrace of technology, in a way that merges both traditional and contemporary elements of Japanese culture.
© Yoshiaki Tsutsui © Yoshiaki Tsutsui

Born in what is now Seoul when Korea was under Japanese rule, Ito's family moved to Japan itself when he was just two years old; he would eventually attend the University of Tokyo, where his prize-winning undergraduate thesis secured him a place in the office of Kiyonori Kikutake, a founder of Metabolism and one of the leading Japanese architects at the time.

Yatsushiro Municipal Museum. Image © Tomio Ohashi Yatsushiro Municipal Museum. Image © Tomio Ohashi
Sendai Mediatheque. Image © Nacasa & Partners Inc Sendai Mediatheque. Image © Nacasa & Partners Inc

Toyo Ito founded his

Tama Art University Library. Image ©  Iwan Baan
Taichung Metropolitan Opera House. Image © Lucas K. Doolan
Tower of Winds. Image © Tomio Ohashi
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Chapel Proposal in Senegal Uses Local Materials to Unite the Community

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Courtesy of Cassidy+Wilson Courtesy of Cassidy+Wilson Taking third place in the recently-concluded Kaira Looro competition to design a multi-faith place of worship for the community of Tanaf in Senegal, this design by Sean Cassidy and Joe Wilson proposes a circular chapel with a sunken exterior moat in which locals can privately reflect and pray. Meanwhile, the central sanctum is designed to be constructed by locals with handmade clay bricks, forming a design which, as Cassidy and Wilson explain, "literally comes from the 'God given land'" that the community equally "can take pride in and call their own upon completion."
Courtesy of Cassidy+Wilson Courtesy of Cassidy+Wilson

The Kaira Looro competition, whose name was derived from the words for "Architecture for Peace" in Tanaf's local Mandingo language, asked entrants to develop a small religious design focusing on "a sustainable and culturally-driven architecture, for a place with a lack of materials and with low technology." This

Courtesy of Cassidy+Wilson
Section. Image Courtesy of Cassidy+Wilson
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