Spotlight: Jean Nouvel

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© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan The winner of the Wolf Prize in 2005 and the Pritzker of 2008, French architect Jean Nouvel has attempted to design each of his projects without any preconceived notions. The result is a variety of projects that, while strikingly different, always demonstrate a delicate play with light and shadow as well as a harmonious balance with their surroundings. It was this diverse approach that led the Pritzker Prize Jury in their citation to characterize Nouvel as primarily "courageous" in his "pursuit of new ideas and his challenge of accepted norms in order to stretch the boundaries of the field."
Image via screenshot from <a href='http://www.archdaily.com/476799/video-jean-nouvel-on-arabic-architecture-context-and-culture'>"Jean Nouvel: Architecture is Listening" video by Louisiana Channel</a> Image via screenshot from <a href='http://www.archdaily.com/476799/video-jean-nouvel-on-arabic-architecture-context-and-culture'>"Jean Nouvel: Architecture is Listening" video by Louisiana Channel</a>

After initially failing an entrance exam at the École des Beaux-Arts of Bordeaux, Nouvel studied architecture at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, having won a national competition to attend the school.

Institut du Monde Arabe. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/roryrory/2520002099'>Flickr user roryrory</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Doha Office Tower, Qatar. Image © Nelson Garrido
Fondation Cartier. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/roryrory/2520905260'>Flickr user roryrory</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
100 Eleventh Avenue. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/shinyasuzuki/32333130260'>Flickr user shinyasuzuki</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>
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Impractical Chinese Skyscraper Features 108-Meter-Tall Facade Waterfall

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A skyscraper in Guiyang, China, has attracted headlines thanks to a daring water feature built into its facade. On one side, the 121-meter (397-foot) tall Liebian Building in Guiyang, China, features a spectacular waterfall, providing a dramatic spectacle from the plaza below. At 108-meters (350-feet), the waterfall is among the tallest artificial waterfalls in the world—and easily the largest artificial waterfall located in an urban area, with other record breakers being artificial additions to river and canal networks. Planned as a new tourist attraction for the city's central business district, the skyscraper has certainly caught the media's attention, however it has also attracted its fair share of controversy. According to the Times, when the waterfall was first switched on, some local residents called local newspapers to report a catastrophic water leak. Other citizens have raised concerns over the wastefulness of the waterfall, with reports claiming that the water feature's running costs are up to 800 yuan,
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Spotlight: Richard Rogers

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Centre Georges Pompidou / Richard Rogers + Renzo Piano. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/2496569412'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Centre Georges Pompidou / Richard Rogers + Renzo Piano. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/2496569412'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> As one of the leading architects of the British High-Tech movement, Pritzker Prize-winner Richard Rogers stands out as one of the most innovative and distinctive architects of a generation. Rogers made his name in the 1970s and '80s, with buildings such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and the Headquarters for Lloyd's Bank in London. To this day his work plays with similar motifs, utilizing bright colors and structural elements to create a style that is recognizable, yet also highly adaptable.
© 2013 Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners LLP © 2013 Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners LLP

Rogers was born in Florence, but his family moved to Britain during the Second World War, when Rogers was a child. After attending the Architectural Association in London, Rogers studied in the United

Rogers House / Richard & Su Rogers. Image © Tim Crocker
Inmos Microprocessor Factory. Image © Ken Kirkwood
Lloyd's of London Building. Image © Mark Ramsay
The Leadenhall Building. Image © Richard Bryant – Courtesy of British Land/Oxford Properties
Millennium Dome. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/jamesjin/58712717/'>Flickr user jamesjin</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
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LIVE: Watch Rem Koolhaas at the Moscow Urban Forum

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At the Moscow Urban ForumRem Koolhaas speaks to Vladimir Pozner about his life and work, including how he has been influenced by Russian architecture. The pair aim to also discuss how the city of Moscow has evolved and the role that it currently has in the world. Watch the live stream above.
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Spotlight: Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown

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Franklin Court, Philadelphia. Image © Mark Cohn Franklin Court, Philadelphia. Image © Mark Cohn Through their pioneering theory and provocative built work, husband and wife duo Robert Venturi (born June 25, 1925) and Denise Scott Brown (born October 3, 1931) were at the forefront of the postmodern movement, leading the charge in one of the most significant shifts in architecture of the 20th century by publishing seminal books such as Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture (authored by Robert Venturi alone) and Learning from Las Vegas (co-authored by Venturi, Scott Brown and Steven Izenour).
© Frank Hanswijk © Frank Hanswijk
Vanna Venturi House / Robert Venturi. Image © Maria Buszek Vanna Venturi House / Robert Venturi. Image © Maria Buszek

Born in Philadelphia and Northern Rhodesia (modern day Zambia) respectively, Venturi and Scott Brown met while they were both teaching at the University of Pennsylvania in 1960. They married in 1967, and in 1969 Scott Brown joined Venturi's firm—then named Venturi and Raunch—as partner in charge of planning. The firm rebranded in 1980

Chapel at the Episcopal Academy. Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Espicopal_Acad_int.JPG'>via Wikimedia</a> (Image by Wikimedia user Smallbones in public domain)
Best Products Showroom, Langhorne, Pennsylvania. Image © Tom Bernard
Denise Scott Brown outside Las Vegas in 1966. Image from the Archives of Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown © Robert Venturi
Sainsbury Wing, National Gallery London / Venturi Scott Brown. Image © Valentino Danilo Matteis
Seattle Art Museum. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dph1110/2671587271'>Flickr user dph1110</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
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Spotlight: Álvaro Siza

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The Building on the Water. Image © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG The Building on the Water. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG One of the most highly regarded architects of his generation, Portugese architect Álvaro Siza (born 25 June 1933) is known for his sculptural works that have been described as "poetic modernism." When he was awarded the Pritzker Prize in 1992, Siza was credited as being a successor of early modernists: the jury citation describes how "his shapes, molded by light, have a deceptive simplicity about them; they are honest."
Courtesy of Álvaro Siza Courtesy of Álvaro Siza

Born in Matosinhos near Porto, as a child Siza wanted to become a sculptor, a predilection that shows itself in his work to this day. However, a trip to Barcelona convinced him to become an architect when he experienced the work of Antoni Gaudí. This sculptural architecture he then knits into its context, connecting his buildings with the site and the culture masterfully.

Leça Swimming Pools. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Swimming_Pool_Piscinas_de_Mar%C3%A9s_Le%C3%A7a_da_Palmeira_by_%C3%81lvaro_Siza_foto_Christian_G%C3%A4nshirt.jpg'>Wikimedia user Christian Gänshirt</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a> Leça Swimming Pools. Image © <a href='https://commons.
Expo'98 Portuguese National Pavilion. Image © Flickr user Pedro Moura Pinheiro
Fundação Iberê Camargo. Image © Grazielle Bruscato
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Spotlight: Antoni Gaudí

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La Sagrada Familia's passion facade. Image © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada  Família La Sagrada Familia's passion facade. Image © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família When Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí (25 June 1852 – 10 June 1926) graduated from the Barcelona Architecture School in 1878, the director of the school Elies Rogent reportedly declared: "Gentlemen, we are here today either in the presence of a genius or a madman!" [1] Well over a century later, this tension is still evident in Gaudí's work; though he is widely regarded as a genius architect, his distinctive style stands as a singularity in architectural history—simultaneously awe-inspiring and bizarre, never fitting into any stylistic movement, and never adapted or emulated, except by those still working to complete his magnum opus, Barcelona's famous Sagrada Família.
Gaudí in 1878. Public Domain image taken by Pau Audouard Gaudí in 1878. Public Domain image taken by Pau Audouard

Born in the Catalan village of either Riudoms or Reus (the records conflict), from a young age Gaudí was fascinated by nature. Between 1875 and 1878, Gaudí was

Casa Milà. Image © Samuel Ludwig
Casa Batlló. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/srboisvert/306517767'>Flickr user srboisvert</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
La Sagrada Familia interior. Image © Renate Dodell
Colònia Güell. Image © Samuel Ludwig
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Spotlight: Benedetta Tagliabue

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Santa Caterina Market. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ligthelm/8271776325'>Flickr user ligthelm</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Santa Caterina Market. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ligthelm/8271776325'>Flickr user ligthelm</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Benedetta Tagliabue (born 24 June 1963) is an Italian architect known for designs which are sensitive to their context and yet still experimental in their approach to forms and materials. Her diverse and complex works have marked her Barcelona-based firm EMBT as one of the most respected Spanish practices of the 21st century.
Courtesy of RIBA Courtesy of RIBA
Santa Caterina Market. Image © Ceramica Cumella Santa Caterina Market. Image © Ceramica Cumella

Born in Milan, Tagliabue graduated from the Istituto Universitario di Architettura di Venezia in 1989. In the early 1990s, she married Spanish architect Enric Miralles and the pair founded their studio Miralles Tagliabue EMBT. Together, Miralles and Tagliabue designed some of the practice's most notable works, including the renovation of the Santa Caterina Market in Barcelona and the enormous edifice of the Scottish Parliament Building—a building which critic

Scottish Parliament Building. Image © Dave Morris
Diagonal Mar Park. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/oh-barcelona/6815735718'>Flickr user oh-barcelona</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
The Spanish Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo.
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Frida Escobedo’s 2018 Serpentine Pavilion Opens in London

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© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu

The 2018 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, designed by Frida Escobedo, was unveiled today in London's Hyde Park. Escobedo's design, which fuses elements typical to Mexican architecture with local London references, features a courtyard enclosed by two rectangular volumes constructed from cement roof tiles. These tiles are stacked to form a celosia, a type of wall common to Mexican architecture which is permeable, allowing ventilation and views to the other side.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu

The courtyard of the pavilion is oriented exactly along the North-South, a reference to the Prime Meridian, which runs through Greenwich a number of miles to the East of the pavilion. Inside the courtyard, a shallow water pool and the curving, mirrored roof element reflect light, emphasizing the changes in light and shadow throughout the day.

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan

"My design for the Serpentine Pavilion 2018 is a meeting of material and historical inspirations inseparable from the city of

© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Iwan Baan
Frida Escobedo in her 2018 Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Vanessa Vielma
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Spotlight: Frank Lloyd Wright

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Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy In 1991, the American Institute of Architects called him, quite simply, “the greatest American architect of all time.” Over his lifetime, Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) completed more than 500 architectural works; many of them are considered masterpieces. Thanks to the wide dissemination of his designs and his many years spent teaching at the school he founded, few architects in history can claim to have inspired more young people into joining the architecture profession.
Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frank_Lloyd_Wright_portrait.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a>. Photograph by Al Ravenna in the public domain. Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frank_Lloyd_Wright_portrait.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a>. Photograph by Al Ravenna in the public domain.

Wright is particularly interesting because of the unique period in history which he occupied: as a disciple of Louis Sullivan ("form follows function") in the late 19th century, his work forms something of a bridge between the traditional architecture of that era and the modernists which began to appear

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/132084522@N05/17207156426'>Flickr user Sam valadi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Taliesin West. Image © <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:TaliesinWest2010.JPG'>Wikimedia user AndrewHorne</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a>
Frederick C. Robie House. Image © Nat Hansen
Marin Civic Center. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/joevare/3506611084'>Flickr user joevare</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>
Wingspread. Image © Galen Frysinger
Ennis House. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ennis_House_front_view_2005.jpg'>Wikimedia user Mike Dillon</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
SC Johnson Wax Research Tower. Image © SC Johnson
Fallingwater House. Image © Western Pennsylvania Conservancy
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Is This Yeezy Home 1.0? Kanye West Collaborator Teases Affordable Housing Project on Instagram

    <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjk1RObFmR1/" data-instgrm-version="8" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"><div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;"></div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjk1RObFmR1/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" >A post shared by Jalil Peraza (@jalilperaza)</a> on <time style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;" datetime="2018-06-03T20:13:10+00:00">Jun 3, 2018 at 1:13pm PDT</time></p> </div></blockquote> <script async defer src="http://www.instagram.com/embed.js"></script>
A month after Kanye West announced his intention to open an architecture venture, at the time named Yeezy Home, off the back of his fashion brand, it seems we may have the first glimpse of the type of buildings the rapper is hoping to create. Yesterday Jalil Peraza, a previous collaborator with West's design company DONDA and designer of the "Face Modules" pop-up retail concept, posted two images to his Instagram showing a building render alongside the caption "Low income housing scheme, made of prefabricated concrete in collaboration with Petra Kustrin, Jalil Peraza, Kanye West, Nejc Skufca."
As is often the case with
Continue reading "Is This Yeezy Home 1.0? Kanye West Collaborator Teases Affordable Housing Project on Instagram"

Spotlight: Carlo Scarpa

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Museo Castelvecchio. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/andreaosti/4505639981/'>Flickr user andreaosti</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Museo Castelvecchio. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/andreaosti/4505639981/'>Flickr user andreaosti</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> One of the most enigmatic and underappreciated architects of the 20th century, Carlo Scarpa (June 2, 1906 – November 28, 1978) is best known for his instinctive approach to materials, combining time-honored crafts with modern manufacturing processes. In a 1996 documentary directed by Murray Grigor, Egle Trincanato, the President of the Fondazione Querini Stampalia for whom Scarpa renovated a Venetian palace in 1963, described how "above all, he was exceptionally skillful in knowing how to combine a base material with a precious one."
Carlo Scarpa studying drawings by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1954. Image © Mario De Biasi (public domain) Carlo Scarpa studying drawings by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1954. Image © Mario De Biasi (public domain)
Museo Castelvecchio. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/leonl/6121652268/'>Flickr user leonl</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Museo Castelvecchio. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/leonl/6121652268/'>Flickr user leonl</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>

Born in Venice, Scarpa spent most of his early childhood in

Central Pavilion in the Giardini at the Venice Biennale. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/10160349164/'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Garden at the Querini Stampalia. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/8142985275'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Olivetti Showroom. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/8068024216'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Olivetti Showroom. Image © Orch_chemollo
Brion Tomb and Sanctuary. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/leonl/6106113845/'>Flickr user leonl</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Brion Tomb and Sanctuary. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/batintherain/8192243875'>Flickr user batintherain</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
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First Serpentine Pavilion Outside UK Opens with Design by JIAKUN Architects

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© WF CENTRAL © WF CENTRAL

A new Serpentine Pavilion has opened in Beijing, China, marking the first time the prestigious program has been implemented away from its usual home at the Serpentine Gallery in Hyde Park, London. Designed by JIAKUN Architects, the pavilion was commissioned by The Serpentine Galleries working in partnership with WF CENTRAL, and is located just 600 meters away from Beijing's Forbidden City.

© WF CENTRAL © WF CENTRAL

The design by JIAKUN Architects is inspired by Confucianism, with curved, cantilevered steel beams and cables representing the symbol of the archer, a representation of the traditional pursuit of Junzi. "Although modern architecture in Beijing has developed a series of powerful techniques to fight the external forces of fierce winds and unpredictable earthquakes, the Pavilion’s integral structure aims—like the Tai Chi Master—to conquer the harshness of those forces with softness," explains a press release from The Serpentine Galleries.

© WF CENTRAL © WF
© WF CENTRAL
© WF CENTRAL
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Spotlight: Norman Foster

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Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young Arguably the leading name of a generation of internationally high-profile British architects, Norman Foster (born 1 June 1935)—or to give him his full title Norman Robert Foster, Baron Foster of Thames Bank of Reddish, OM, HonFREng—gained recognition as early as the 1970s as a key architect in the high-tech movement, which continues to have a profound impact on architecture as we know it today.

Foster's architecture is remarkably diverse; he has designed skyscrapers, offices, galleries, airports, stadiums, parliament buildings, city masterplans and even a spaceport. Yet his work is unified by one theme, identified in the jury citation for his 1999 Pritzker Prize: "from his very first projects, it was evident that he would embrace the most advanced technology appropriate to the task." It is this devotion to the latest architectural technology that earned him his place in the High-Tech movement, with buildings

Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank. Image © Wikimedia user WiNG licensed under CC BY 3.0
Masdar Institute. Image © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners
Hearst Tower. Image © Chuck Choi
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Spotlight: Toyo Ito

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Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu As one of the leading architects of Japan's increasingly highly-regarded architecture culture, 2013 Pritzker Laureate Toyo Ito (born June 1, 1941) has defined his career by combining elements of minimalism with an embrace of technology, in a way that merges both traditional and contemporary elements of Japanese culture.
© Yoshiaki Tsutsui © Yoshiaki Tsutsui

Born in what is now Seoul when Korea was under Japanese rule, Ito's family moved to Japan itself when he was just two years old; he would eventually attend the University of Tokyo, where his prize-winning undergraduate thesis secured him a place in the office of Kiyonori Kikutake, a founder of Metabolism and one of the leading Japanese architects at the time.

Yatsushiro Municipal Museum. Image © Tomio Ohashi Yatsushiro Municipal Museum. Image © Tomio Ohashi
Sendai Mediatheque. Image © Nacasa & Partners Inc. Sendai Mediatheque. Image © Nacasa & Partners Inc.

Toyo Ito founded his

Tama Art University Library. Image © Iwan Baan
Taichung Metropolitan Opera House. Image © Lucas K. Doolan
Tower of Winds. Image © Tomio Ohashi
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ADEPT and KARRES + BRANDS Wins Contest to Design One of Germany’s Largest Masterplans

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© ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS © ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS

ADEPT and KARRES + BRANDS have won the international competition to design Oberbillwerder, a new masterplan district in the city of Hamburg. Offering around a million square meters of housing, business, shopping, public buildings, and recreational activities, the Oberbillwerder plan is the largest single development plan in Germany since Hafencity, which contains around 1.7 million square meters of new space (including the Hamburg Elbphilharmonie) and is also currently being completed in Hamburg.

© ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS © ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS

The proposal developed alongside Transsolar and titled in full "Oberbillwerder—The Connected City" places its focus on transport connectivity, especially for pedestrians, cyclists, and users of public transport. In the plan, a green artery runs throughout the street layout and will provide access to all the neighborhoods, public buildings, and recreational activities of the new masterplan, while the proposal also features rapid connections to central Hamburg.

© ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS © ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS

In tandem with these transport

© ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS
© ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS
Continue reading "ADEPT and KARRES + BRANDS Wins Contest to Design One of Germany’s Largest Masterplans"

2018 Venice Biennale Winners: Eduardo Souto do Moura, Switzerland, Great Britain, Jan der Vylde, Rahul Mehrotra, Andra Matin

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Courtesy of the Venice Biennale Courtesy of the Venice Biennale The curators of the 2018 Venice Biennale Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara of Grafton Architects have announced the winning contributions to the 16th International Architecture Exhibition. Selected with the help of jury members Frank Barkow, Sofia Von Ellrichshausen, Kate Goodwin, Patricia Patkau, and Pier Paolo Tamburelli, the winners of the Golden Lion for Best National Participation went to Switzerland. Meanwhile, in the Freespace exhibition curated by Farrell and McNamara at Venice's Arsenale, Eduardo Souto de Moura will take home the Golden Lion for Best Participant in the International Exhibition.

Best National Participation

Golden Lion: Switzerland

Svizzera 240 - House Tour. Image © Italo Rondinella Svizzera 240 - House Tour. Image © Italo Rondinella

The Golden Lion for the national pavilions was awarded to Switzerland, whose pavilion was praised for presenting "a compelling exhibition which was enjoyable while tackling the critical issues of scale in domestic space."

Honorable Mention: Great Britain

Great Britain Pavilion, "Island". Image © Italo Rondinella Great Britain Pavilion, "Island". Image
Eduardo Souto de Moura. Image © Francesco Galli
architecten de vylder vinck taillieu. Image © Italo Rondinella
RMA Architects. Image © Italo Rondinella
Andra Matin. Image © Francesco Galli
Courtesy of the Venice Biennale
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10 Chapels in a Venice Forest Comprise The Vatican’s First Ever Biennale Contribution

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Aerial view. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Aerial view. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu With the opening of the 16th Venice Architecture Biennale comes a look at the first ever contribution by the Holy See, an exhibition that brings together architects to design chapels that, after the Biennale, can be relocated to sites around the globe. Located in a wooded area on the Venetian island of San Giorgio Maggiore, 10 chapels by architects including Norman Foster, Eduardo Souto de Moura, and Smiljan Radic, are joined by the Asplund Chapel by MAP Architects. This 11th structure serves as a prelude to the other chapels, while reflecting on Gunnar Asplund's 1920 design for the Woodland Chapel. The Asplund Pavilion, like the Woodland Chapel that inspired it, is intended as a “place of orientation, encounter, meditation, and salutation.” The interior hosts an exhibition of drawings by Gunnar Asplund for the Woodland Chapel, accompanied by documents and models illustrating its concept and
Smiljan Radic. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Carla Juaçaba. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Javier Corvalán. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Sean Godsell. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Flores&Prats. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Eduardo Souto de Moura. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Francesco Cellini. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Norman Foster. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Andrew Berman. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Teronobu Fujimori. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
MAP Architects. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
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