mud and oil

river road
[image: Gena Wirth] If you’ll be in New Orleans next week for the ASLA convention, you can join SCAPE Studio and the Dredge Research Collaborative for a bus tour of petrochemical and sedimentary infrastructure along River Road. In addition to SCAPE and the DRC, you’ll have the opportunity to hear from local experts including Scott Eustis (coastal wetlands specialist at the Gulf Restoration Network and, among other things, Public Lab kite flyer), Michael Orr (Communications Director at the Louisiana Environmental Action Network), and Randy Petersen (a Louisiana petrochemical industry expert at Homesite Company and author of “Giants on the River”, a history of the petrochemical industry along River Road). You can sign up through the ASLA’s website, where you’ll be looking to register for FS-008.

mud and oil

river road
[image: Gena Wirth] If you’ll be in New Orleans next week for the ASLA convention, you can join SCAPE Studio and the Dredge Research Collaborative for a bus tour of petrochemical and sedimentary infrastructure along River Road. In addition to SCAPE and the DRC, you’ll have the opportunity to hear from local experts including Scott Eustis (coastal wetlands specialist at the Gulf Restoration Network and, among other things, Public Lab kite flyer), Michael Orr (Communications Director at the Louisiana Environmental Action Network), and Randy Petersen (a Louisiana petrochemical industry expert at Homesite Company and author of “Giants on the River”, a history of the petrochemical industry along River Road). You can sign up through the ASLA’s website, where you’ll be looking to register for FS-008.

mud and oil

river road
[image: Gena Wirth] If you’ll be in New Orleans next week for the ASLA convention, you can join SCAPE Studio and the Dredge Research Collaborative for a bus tour of petrochemical and sedimentary infrastructure along River Road. In addition to SCAPE and the DRC, you’ll have the opportunity to hear from local experts including Scott Eustis (coastal wetlands specialist at the Gulf Restoration Network and, among other things, Public Lab kite flyer), Michael Orr (Communications Director at the Louisiana Environmental Action Network), and Randy Petersen (a Louisiana petrochemical industry expert at Homesite Company and author of “Giants on the River”, a history of the petrochemical industry along River Road). You can sign up through the ASLA’s website, where you’ll be looking to register for FS-008.

mud and oil

river road
[image: Gena Wirth] If you’ll be in New Orleans next week for the ASLA convention, you can join SCAPE Studio and the Dredge Research Collaborative for a bus tour of petrochemical and sedimentary infrastructure along River Road. In addition to SCAPE and the DRC, you’ll have the opportunity to hear from local experts including Scott Eustis (coastal wetlands specialist at the Gulf Restoration Network and, among other things, Public Lab kite flyer), Michael Orr (Communications Director at the Louisiana Environmental Action Network), and Randy Petersen (a Louisiana petrochemical industry expert at Homesite Company and author of “Giants on the River”, a history of the petrochemical industry along River Road). You can sign up through the ASLA’s website, where you’ll be looking to register for FS-008.

mud and oil

river road
[image: Gena Wirth] If you’ll be in New Orleans next week for the ASLA convention, you can join SCAPE Studio and the Dredge Research Collaborative for a bus tour of petrochemical and sedimentary infrastructure along River Road. In addition to SCAPE and the DRC, you’ll have the opportunity to hear from local experts including Scott Eustis (coastal wetlands specialist at the Gulf Restoration Network and, among other things, Public Lab kite flyer), Michael Orr (Communications Director at the Louisiana Environmental Action Network), and Randy Petersen (a Louisiana petrochemical industry expert at Homesite Company and author of “Giants on the River”, a history of the petrochemical industry along River Road). You can sign up through the ASLA’s website, where you’ll be looking to register for FS-008.

mud and oil

river road
[image: Gena Wirth] If you’ll be in New Orleans next week for the ASLA convention, you can join SCAPE Studio and the Dredge Research Collaborative for a bus tour of petrochemical and sedimentary infrastructure along River Road. In addition to SCAPE and the DRC, you’ll have the opportunity to hear from local experts including Scott Eustis (coastal wetlands specialist at the Gulf Restoration Network and, among other things, Public Lab kite flyer), Michael Orr (Communications Director at the Louisiana Environmental Action Network), and Randy Petersen (a Louisiana petrochemical industry expert at Homesite Company and author of “Giants on the River”, a history of the petrochemical industry along River Road). You can sign up through the ASLA’s website, where you’ll be looking to register for FS-008.

mud and oil

river road
[image: Gena Wirth] If you’ll be in New Orleans next week for the ASLA convention, you can join SCAPE Studio and the Dredge Research Collaborative for a bus tour of petrochemical and sedimentary infrastructure along River Road. In addition to SCAPE and the DRC, you’ll have the opportunity to hear from local experts including Scott Eustis (coastal wetlands specialist at the Gulf Restoration Network and, among other things, Public Lab kite flyer), Michael Orr (Communications Director at the Louisiana Environmental Action Network), and Randy Petersen (a Louisiana petrochemical industry expert at Homesite Company and author of “Giants on the River”, a history of the petrochemical industry along River Road). You can sign up through the ASLA’s website, where you’ll be looking to register for FS-008.

mud and oil

river road
[image: Gena Wirth] If you’ll be in New Orleans next week for the ASLA convention, you can join SCAPE Studio and the Dredge Research Collaborative for a bus tour of petrochemical and sedimentary infrastructure along River Road. In addition to SCAPE and the DRC, you’ll have the opportunity to hear from local experts including Scott Eustis (coastal wetlands specialist at the Gulf Restoration Network and, among other things, Public Lab kite flyer), Michael Orr (Communications Director at the Louisiana Environmental Action Network), and Randy Petersen (a Louisiana petrochemical industry expert at Homesite Company and author of “Giants on the River”, a history of the petrochemical industry along River Road). You can sign up through the ASLA’s website, where you’ll be looking to register for FS-008.

mud and oil

river road
[image: Gena Wirth] If you’ll be in New Orleans next week for the ASLA convention, you can join SCAPE Studio and the Dredge Research Collaborative for a bus tour of petrochemical and sedimentary infrastructure along River Road. In addition to SCAPE and the DRC, you’ll have the opportunity to hear from local experts including Scott Eustis (coastal wetlands specialist at the Gulf Restoration Network and, among other things, Public Lab kite flyer), Michael Orr (Communications Director at the Louisiana Environmental Action Network), and Randy Petersen (a Louisiana petrochemical industry expert at Homesite Company and author of “Giants on the River”, a history of the petrochemical industry along River Road). You can sign up through the ASLA’s website, where you’ll be looking to register for FS-008.

dredgefest california

Print The Dredge Research Collaborative is inviting participants to apply for the workshops at our upcoming event, DredgeFest California. We are seeking faculty, practicing designers, scientists, industry professionals, policymakers, regulators, junior scholars, advanced students, and other interested parties to join us in the Bay Area, June 13-19, 2016. DSC_2607 DSC_2640
[Tours at DredgeFest Great Lakes, summer 2015.] Sediment is critical to the present and future health of California’s estuarine Bay-Delta. It is the physical infrastructure that underlies its many ecologies and economies. As the 2015 State of the Estuary report notes, “Like fresh water, sediment is a precious resource that is essential for keeping the Estuary healthy”. But the Bay-Delta currently has a shortage of this land making resource. Upriver dams have trapped sediment, while levees, bank armoring, and river straightening have cut off wetlands and floodplains while accelerating the movement of the remaining sediment, preventing it from building substrate. The
Print_LakeErie
Continue reading "dredgefest california"

dredgefest california

Print The Dredge Research Collaborative is inviting participants to apply for the workshops at our upcoming event, DredgeFest California. We are seeking faculty, practicing designers, scientists, industry professionals, policymakers, regulators, junior scholars, advanced students, and other interested parties to join us in the Bay Area, June 13-19, 2016. DSC_2607 DSC_2640
[Tours at DredgeFest Great Lakes, summer 2015.] Sediment is critical to the present and future health of California’s estuarine Bay-Delta. It is the physical infrastructure that underlies its many ecologies and economies. As the 2015 State of the Estuary report notes, “Like fresh water, sediment is a precious resource that is essential for keeping the Estuary healthy”. But the Bay-Delta currently has a shortage of this land making resource. Upriver dams have trapped sediment, while levees, bank armoring, and river straightening have cut off wetlands and floodplains while accelerating the movement of the remaining sediment, preventing it from building substrate. The
Print_LakeErie
Continue reading "dredgefest california"

dredgefest california

Print The Dredge Research Collaborative is inviting participants to apply for the workshops at our upcoming event, DredgeFest California. We are seeking faculty, practicing designers, scientists, industry professionals, policymakers, regulators, junior scholars, advanced students, and other interested parties to join us in the Bay Area, June 13-19, 2016. DSC_2607 DSC_2640
[Tours at DredgeFest Great Lakes, summer 2015.] Sediment is critical to the present and future health of California’s estuarine Bay-Delta. It is the physical infrastructure that underlies its many ecologies and economies. As the 2015 State of the Estuary report notes, “Like fresh water, sediment is a precious resource that is essential for keeping the Estuary healthy”. But the Bay-Delta currently has a shortage of this land making resource. Upriver dams have trapped sediment, while levees, bank armoring, and river straightening have cut off wetlands and floodplains while accelerating the movement of the remaining sediment, preventing it from building substrate. The
Print_LakeErie
Continue reading "dredgefest california"

dredgefest california

Print The Dredge Research Collaborative is inviting participants to apply for the workshops at our upcoming event, DredgeFest California. We are seeking faculty, practicing designers, scientists, industry professionals, policymakers, regulators, junior scholars, advanced students, and other interested parties to join us in the Bay Area, June 13-19, 2016. DSC_2607 DSC_2640
[Tours at DredgeFest Great Lakes, summer 2015.] Sediment is critical to the present and future health of California’s estuarine Bay-Delta. It is the physical infrastructure that underlies its many ecologies and economies. As the 2015 State of the Estuary report notes, “Like fresh water, sediment is a precious resource that is essential for keeping the Estuary healthy”. But the Bay-Delta currently has a shortage of this land making resource. Upriver dams have trapped sediment, while levees, bank armoring, and river straightening have cut off wetlands and floodplains while accelerating the movement of the remaining sediment, preventing it from building substrate. The
Print_LakeErie
Continue reading "dredgefest california"

dredgefest california

Print The Dredge Research Collaborative is inviting participants to apply for the workshops at our upcoming event, DredgeFest California. We are seeking faculty, practicing designers, scientists, industry professionals, policymakers, regulators, junior scholars, advanced students, and other interested parties to join us in the Bay Area, June 13-19, 2016. DSC_2607 DSC_2640
[Tours at DredgeFest Great Lakes, summer 2015.] Sediment is critical to the present and future health of California’s estuarine Bay-Delta. It is the physical infrastructure that underlies its many ecologies and economies. As the 2015 State of the Estuary report notes, “Like fresh water, sediment is a precious resource that is essential for keeping the Estuary healthy”. But the Bay-Delta currently has a shortage of this land making resource. Upriver dams have trapped sediment, while levees, bank armoring, and river straightening have cut off wetlands and floodplains while accelerating the movement of the remaining sediment, preventing it from building substrate. The
Print_LakeErie
Continue reading "dredgefest california"

dredgefest california

Print The Dredge Research Collaborative is inviting participants to apply for the workshops at our upcoming event, DredgeFest California. We are seeking faculty, practicing designers, scientists, industry professionals, policymakers, regulators, junior scholars, advanced students, and other interested parties to join us in the Bay Area, June 13-19, 2016. DSC_2607 DSC_2640
[Tours at DredgeFest Great Lakes, summer 2015.] Sediment is critical to the present and future health of California’s estuarine Bay-Delta. It is the physical infrastructure that underlies its many ecologies and economies. As the 2015 State of the Estuary report notes, “Like fresh water, sediment is a precious resource that is essential for keeping the Estuary healthy”. But the Bay-Delta currently has a shortage of this land making resource. Upriver dams have trapped sediment, while levees, bank armoring, and river straightening have cut off wetlands and floodplains while accelerating the movement of the remaining sediment, preventing it from building substrate. The
Print_LakeErie
Continue reading "dredgefest california"

prosthetic landscapes in a time of acceleration

pl_ci
[Levee between two containment cells on Craney Island, summer 2013.] I’m speaking this Saturday, 28 Feb, at an interdisciplinary arts event in Amsterdam, the Sonic Acts Festival, whose theme for 2015 is “The Geologic Imagination”. My talk is in a session that starts at 10:30 am, entitled “Landscape Transformation”. The session also includes geologist and author Michael Welland (whose book, Sand, was an early influence on our work in the Dredge Research Collaborative) and film-maker/photographer Jananne Al-Ani (who will be presenting work related to the development of flight and aerial representation — also of great interest here). I’ll be talking about what I’m calling the “prosthetic littoral”:

The tools are both prosaic and bizarre. Sensate geotextiles. Miniscule tracking sensors embedded in flowing streams of silt and sand. Turbidity curtains. Slumping geotubes. Confined disposal facilities, slowly-shifting landscape machines that occupy entire islands. The polypropylene apparatus of engineered erosion Continue reading "prosthetic landscapes in a time of acceleration"

prosthetic landscapes in a time of acceleration

pl_ci
[Levee between two containment cells on Craney Island, summer 2013.] I’m speaking this Saturday, 28 Feb, at an interdisciplinary arts event in Amsterdam, the Sonic Acts Festival, whose theme for 2015 is “The Geologic Imagination”. My talk is in a session that starts at 10:30 am, entitled “Landscape Transformation”. The session also includes geologist and author Michael Welland (whose book, Sand, was an early influence on our work in the Dredge Research Collaborative) and film-maker/photographer Jananne Al-Ani (who will be presenting work related to the development of flight and aerial representation — also of great interest here). I’ll be talking about what I’m calling the “prosthetic littoral”:

The tools are both prosaic and bizarre. Sensate geotextiles. Miniscule tracking sensors embedded in flowing streams of silt and sand. Turbidity curtains. Slumping geotubes. Confined disposal facilities, slowly-shifting landscape machines that occupy entire islands. The polypropylene apparatus of engineered erosion Continue reading "prosthetic landscapes in a time of acceleration"

prosthetic landscapes in a time of acceleration

pl_ci
[Levee between two containment cells on Craney Island, summer 2013.] I’m speaking this Saturday, 28 Feb, at an interdisciplinary arts event in Amsterdam, the Sonic Acts Festival, whose theme for 2015 is “The Geologic Imagination”. My talk is in a session that starts at 10:30 am, entitled “Landscape Transformation”. The session also includes geologist and author Michael Welland (whose book, Sand, was an early influence on our work in the Dredge Research Collaborative) and film-maker/photographer Jananne Al-Ani (who will be presenting work related to the development of flight and aerial representation — also of great interest here). I’ll be talking about what I’m calling the “prosthetic littoral”:

The tools are both prosaic and bizarre. Sensate geotextiles. Miniscule tracking sensors embedded in flowing streams of silt and sand. Turbidity curtains. Slumping geotubes. Confined disposal facilities, slowly-shifting landscape machines that occupy entire islands. The polypropylene apparatus of engineered erosion Continue reading "prosthetic landscapes in a time of acceleration"

prosthetic landscapes in a time of acceleration

pl_ci
[Levee between two containment cells on Craney Island, summer 2013.] I’m speaking this Saturday, 28 Feb, at an interdisciplinary arts event in Amsterdam, the Sonic Acts Festival, whose theme for 2015 is “The Geologic Imagination”. My talk is in a session that starts at 10:30 am, entitled “Landscape Transformation”. The session also includes geologist and author Michael Welland (whose book, Sand, was an early influence on our work in the Dredge Research Collaborative) and film-maker/photographer Jananne Al-Ani (who will be presenting work related to the development of flight and aerial representation — also of great interest here). I’ll be talking about what I’m calling the “prosthetic littoral”:

The tools are both prosaic and bizarre. Sensate geotextiles. Miniscule tracking sensors embedded in flowing streams of silt and sand. Turbidity curtains. Slumping geotubes. Confined disposal facilities, slowly-shifting landscape machines that occupy entire islands. The polypropylene apparatus of engineered erosion control. Flotillas of suction dredgers. Concrete tetrapods, armoring countless kilometers of coastline.

With such instruments, humans are radically reshaping the pedosphere, the thin skin of active soils that covers the earth. These landscape prosthetics alternately speed up and slow down the movement of sediments, producing an anthropogenic counterpart to familiar natural cycles like the rock and water cycles: the dredge cycle. Continue reading "prosthetic landscapes in a time of acceleration"

prosthetic landscapes in a time of acceleration

pl_ci
[Levee between two containment cells on Craney Island, summer 2013.] I’m speaking this Saturday, 28 Feb, at an interdisciplinary arts event in Amsterdam, the Sonic Acts Festival, whose theme for 2015 is “The Geologic Imagination”. My talk is in a session that starts at 10:30 am, entitled “Landscape Transformation”. The session also includes geologist and author Michael Welland (whose book, Sand, was an early influence on our work in the Dredge Research Collaborative) and film-maker/photographer Jananne Al-Ani (who will be presenting work related to the development of flight and aerial representation — also of great interest here). I’ll be talking about what I’m calling the “prosthetic littoral”:

The tools are both prosaic and bizarre. Sensate geotextiles. Miniscule tracking sensors embedded in flowing streams of silt and sand. Turbidity curtains. Slumping geotubes. Confined disposal facilities, slowly-shifting landscape machines that occupy entire islands. The polypropylene apparatus of engineered erosion control. Flotillas of suction dredgers. Concrete tetrapods, armoring countless kilometers of coastline.

With such instruments, humans are radically reshaping the pedosphere, the thin skin of active soils that covers the earth. These landscape prosthetics alternately speed up and slow down the movement of sediments, producing an anthropogenic counterpart to familiar natural cycles like the rock and water cycles: the dredge cycle. Within this cyclic whirlwind of accelerated erosion and forced uplift, strange new landscapes are formed and reformed at ever faster pace. Roving the coasts of North America from New York to Virginia to Louisiana, this talk is a tour of such landscapes, the instruments that shape them, and the unexpected design opportunities that may lie within them.

The event is much bigger than just our participation, as it also includes a range of talks from speakers like Liam Young, Smudge Studio, and Benjamin Bratton, music, art installations, and much more. If you’re not in Amsterdam, there is a livestream for the conference.