The opposite job of an architect is a slaughterer and meat packer

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/lb/lbu9fsquxcpsho05.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/lb/lbu9fsquxcpsho05.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/lb/lbu9fsquxcpsho05.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/lb/lbu9fsquxcpsho05.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" /><em>What if you could start over and take the career path most different from the one you&rsquo;re on? Let us help you.
The Labor Department keeps detailed and at times delightfully odd records on the skills and tasks required for each job. Some of them are physical: trunk strength, speed of limb movement, the ability to stay upright. Others are more knowledge-based: economics and accounting, physics, programming. Together, they capture the essence of what makes a job distinctive.

The New York Times has used job specific records to find the polar opposite of each job. Determining skills used either the most or the least, this tool has helped in understanding more clearly what it is people actually do at their job beyond the initial understanding of the title or position.  Type in any job here and find the opposite.  Architects use these skills the most (matching most closely Continue reading "The opposite job of an architect is a slaughterer and meat packer"

Climb Heatherwick’s $150 Million Stairway in the Times’ Daily 360

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/64/64duh2qoywebeu51.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/64/64duh2qoywebeu51.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/64/64duh2qoywebeu51.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/64/64duh2qoywebeu51.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" />Everyday,&nbsp;<em>The New York T</em><em>imes</em> brings its readers a new 360-degree video with their series, The Daily 360. In one of their recent videos for the project, Times journalists give us a behind the scenes look at&nbsp;<a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/354290/thomas-heatherwick" rel="nofollow" >Thomas Heatherwick</a>'s&nbsp;ongoing public project in New York City&rsquo;s Hudson Yards development, <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/811942/vessel" rel="nofollow" >the Vessel</a>. Slated to open early 2019, get an early experience of the $150 million stairway with this <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/video/nyregion/100000004843197/heatherwicks-vessel-at-hudson-yards.html?playlistId=100000004687548" rel="nofollow" >immersive video</a>&mdash;VR headset not necessary.&nbsp;

Is it a bookstore? Is it a fashion concept shop? Yes!

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/eg/eg8la63adxkrua64.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/eg/eg8la63adxkrua64.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/eg/eg8la63adxkrua64.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/eg/eg8la63adxkrua64.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" /><em><p>The future of brick-and-mortar bookstores has been in peril for at least a decade. But whether you&rsquo;re actually shopping for a book or not, you might actually find yourself wandering into a bookstore by accident. Because fashion brands, from French icon Sonia Rykiel to New York City-based Warby Parker, are curating books not as objects to read but as objects of d&eacute;cor.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More and more trendy retailers that used to be exclusively online (think Warby Parker, Glossier, or <a href="https://archinect.com/news/article/150039823/leong-leong-designs-everlane-s-first-flagship-store-in-new-york-city" rel="nofollow" >Everlane</a>) are beginning to open brick-and-mortar concept shops &amp; flagship stores in major cities, and books appear to be front and center in store design &mdash;&nbsp;sometimes as mere decoration but more frequently actually for sale; further blurring the line between traditional bookstores and branded experiences.</p>          

Hiring outlook in architecture expected to be ‘bullish’ for 2018

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/z4/z41hd3pa930ej94r.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/z4/z41hd3pa930ej94r.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/z4/z41hd3pa930ej94r.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/z4/z41hd3pa930ej94r.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" /><em>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re bullish on the outlook for 2018,&rdquo; Kevin Walker, Indeed&rsquo;s senior director of field marketing, said in an interview this week. &ldquo;Assuming employers will do what they say they&rsquo;re going to do, 2018 should be a banner year for the U.S. economy.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>The forecast goes on to predict the job sectors where most of the growth is expected: "Architecture and engineering represent the most active sectors: 82 percent of firms in those fields plan to hire more next year."
Currently looking for new employment in architecture?  Good for you — the job market is very much in your favor, and the selection of hiring firms is substantial. To stay ahead of the competition and discover your next potential employer, make sure to check out the Archinect job board, narrow down your search results with helpful tools and save your searches for quick access later and Continue reading "Hiring outlook in architecture expected to be ‘bullish’ for 2018"

Listen to Episode 46 of Clever: Joe Gebbia

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/listen-to-episode-46-of-clever-joe-gebbia/bernhardt-creatives-8-joe-gebbia-2/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2017/12/Bernhardt-Creatives-8-Joe-Gebbia-810x455.jpg" alt="Listen to Episode 46 of Clever: Joe Gebbia" /></a>
                                In <a href="http://cleverpodcast.com/blog/ep-46-joe-gebbia"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">this episode of Clever</a>, Jaime and Amy talk to Designer, entrepreneur, and Airbnb co-founder, Joe Gebbia, who was known as the “art guy” in grade school when he started his first business selling illustrations of Ninja Turtles. Then, while pursuing dual design degrees, he founded his first legit startup with RISD’s basketball team, The Balls. Now as the leader of innovation and ideation at Airbnb he’s focused on exploring new attitudes of sharing and trust. Oh, and don’t tell him he can’t do something. He will go to extremes to prove you wrong. Listen:

Stay tuned for a new episode of Clever in two weeks! Don’t miss an episode: Subscribe to Clever on Apple PodcastsStitcherGoogle PlaySoundCloud, or use our feed http://clever.libsyn.com/rss to subscribe via your favorite podcast app. Follow Clever on FacebookTwitter and Instagram. And most importantly, please spread the word to anyone who you think would like it.
            <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/design-milk/~4/T20lRhiyRps" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

PLANE—SITE visits Kengo Kuma’s Tokyo offices in new Time-Space-Existence video

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ds/dsrs79p7lastzeo7.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ds/dsrs79p7lastzeo7.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ds/dsrs79p7lastzeo7.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ds/dsrs79p7lastzeo7.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" /><a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/196253/kengo-kuma" rel="nofollow" >Kengo Kuma</a> is one of Japan&rsquo;s most significant living architects, thanks to his sophisticated integrations of traditional architecture with up-to-the-minute technologies. Unusually sensitive to materiality and technique, Kuma&rsquo;s designs are irresistibly tactile, often resembling hand-woven fabrics or an ornate beehive.&nbsp;As part of our partnership with&nbsp;<a href="https://plane-site.com/" rel="nofollow" >PLANE&mdash;SITE</a>&nbsp;(a Berlin-based creative agency working at&nbsp;the interface of urban form, cultural space and social life),&nbsp;we are sharing another video from their&nbsp;<em><a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/1038019/time-space-existence" rel="nofollow" >Time-Space-Existence</a>&nbsp;</em>series featuring the prominent Japanese architect discussing his work.&nbsp;
SunnyHills © DAICI ANO
In this new short video, PLANE—SITE travels to the Tokyo offices of Kengo Kuma & Associates to discuss the topics of time, space, and existence as they relate to his work. Widely regarded as one of Japan’s most eminent architects, Kuma's most significant buildings include Stone Museum in Nasu, which repurposed stone from old rice stores, the Nagasaki Prefectural Museum and...

Discover the Revamped Cocktail and Underground Bar in Vienna


Architecture firm Büro KLK completed the design of the Krypt Bar, an underground social gathering spot in Austria. During the renovation on an ancient heritage building from the late 18th century on Vienna’s traditional Berggasse Street, a bricked-up staircase was found. The staircase led to a 12 meters (39 feet) deep, second cellar with approximately 250 square meters (2,690 square feet). Located between Votivkirche and Sigmund Freud’s apartment, this cocktail and underground bar is an architectural gem. Historical investigations showed that it was a semi-legal establishment in the 1950s and ’60s during Vienna’s flourishing jazz scene.

Once inside, you begin your journey through a narrow entrance door that leads to a first-level basement, containing the cloak room and a mirrored vestibule. Take the staircase directly to the impressive 7 meter (23 feet) long main bar. Several alcoves, a hidden booth, the smallest art gallery in Vienna and secret hallways surround
Continue reading "Discover the Revamped Cocktail and Underground Bar in Vienna"

A Family House in Givatayim by THISISIT Architecture & Design

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/a-family-house-in-givatayim-by-thisisit-architecture-design/gv-house-thisisit-1/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2017/12/GV-HOUSE-THISISIT-1-810x540.jpg" alt="A Family House in Givatayim by THISISIT Architecture &#038; Design" /></a>
                                Spanning 150 square meters, the <a href="https://thisisit.design/gvhouse"  rel="nofollow noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">GV House</a> was bought by a young family looking to update the early 1980s residence located in Givatayim, Israel. They hired <a href="https://thisisit.design/"  rel="nofollow noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">THISISIT Architecture &amp; Design</a> to handle the renovation that involved designing an interior that better worked for their lifestyle.
The couple’s goal was to use materials that would respect the integrity of the house while also giving it a fresh update. A brass faucet and baseboard in the kitchen were used to match the thin brass bars that were installed within the terrazzo floors and concrete stairs like grout. The black cabinets and countertops offer a modern contrast to the brass details. Just off the kitchen is an enclosed sunroom that captures lots of sunlight and leads to the backyard. Brass furnishings bring a cohesive feel throughout the main floor. The bathrooms also benefitted from brass detailing adding a polished finish to the newly
Continue reading "A Family House in Givatayim by THISISIT Architecture & Design"

Aarhus School of Architecture Reveals Winners of Drawing of the Year 2017

    <figure>
1st prize - The One Day Unit / Charles Weinberg and Shai Ben Ami (Click Image for Full Size). Image Courtesy of Arkitektskolan Aarhus 1st prize - The One Day Unit / Charles Weinberg and Shai Ben Ami (Click Image for Full Size). Image Courtesy of Arkitektskolan Aarhus

The Aarhus School of Architecture has revealed the winners of their drawing competition, Drawing of the Year 2017, which asked architecture students around the globe to submit their best digital, hand-drawn or hybrid drawings under the theme of “Everyday Utopia.”

More than 230 submissions were evaluated by an esteemed jury of architects, which consisted of Moon Hoon, founder of Moon Hoon Architects; Trine Berthold, associate partner at schmidt hammer lassen; and Torben Nielsen, professor at Aarhus School of Architecture.

The jury was impressed by the “overwhelming burst of creativity and clever concepts demonstrated in the drawings,” calling out the high level of craft and experimental approaches to drawing.

Three winners were selected:

First Prize

The One Day Unit / Charles Weinberg and Shai

1st prize - The One Day Unit / Charles Weinberg and Shai Ben Ami. Image Courtesy of Arkitektskolan Aarhus
A close-up of "The One Day Unit". Image Courtesy of Arkitektskolan Aarhus
A close-up of "The One Day Unit". Image Courtesy of Arkitektskolan Aarhus
2nd prize - Amazonia / Richard Morrison. Image Courtesy of Arkitektskolan Aarhus
3rd prize - Cinderella's Lost Shoe / Ifigeneia Liangi. Image Courtesy of Arkitektskolan Aarhus
Continue reading "Aarhus School of Architecture Reveals Winners of Drawing of the Year 2017"

Meet Jean-François Bussière of Atelier Bussière

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/meet-jean-francois-bussiere-of-atelier-bussiere/atelier-bussiere-design_mg_0395-2/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2017/11/atelier-bussiere-design_MG_0395-2-810x496.jpg" alt="Meet Jean-François Bussière of Atelier Bussière" /></a>
                                At the 2018 <a href="http://toronto.interiordesignshow.com/"  rel="external noopener noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">IDS Toronto</a> in January, we will again be sponsoring their <a href="http://toronto.interiordesignshow.com/exhibit/maker/"  rel="external noopener noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Maker</a> section, which helps give a platform to designers, makers and brands who are innovating, making a difference or creating design that betters our lives. The Maker section is perfect for businesses that have manufacturing capabilities, and are looking to expand distribution, and we are lucky to be part of the process of choosing them. We talked to Jean-François Bussière of <a href="http://atelierbussiere.com/"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Atelier Bussière</a>:

Jean-François Bussière

How did you get into design and making? Atelier Bussière has existed since 2010. Until 2016, with a team of 25 employees, we were manufacturing granite, marble and quartz countertops. Since we started manufacturing countertops in 2010, I always wanted to create and manufacture different objects and furniture with the stone slabs leftover that we were not able to reuse to manufacture into countertops. I could not accomplish this dream to
Continue reading "Meet Jean-François Bussière of Atelier Bussière"

Joinery Box House / Foomann Architects

    <figure>
© Willem-Dirk Du Toit © Willem-Dirk Du Toit
  • Builder: Fido Projects
  • Landscape Architect: Phillip Johnson Landscapes
  • Engineer: Maurice Farrugia & Associates
  • Stylist: Esther Stewart
© Willem-Dirk Du Toit © Willem-Dirk Du Toit

Text description provided by the architects. The extension to this inner-city heritage home is intended as a tidy, fastidious timber clad structure. An opportunity for meticulous details. The inhabitants moved from their own homes into this new house together; consolidating their extensive art collections and large extended families. Art, furniture and objects were scheduled and located during the planning process. The Dining Room comfortably accommodates twenty-four diners, located in a prime position facing the garden, and features an acoustically treated ceiling.

© Willem-Dirk Du Toit © Willem-Dirk Du Toit

The original part of the house was respectfully upgraded and restored with a new openness that connects sitting and

Ground Floor Plan
© Willem-Dirk Du Toit
First Floor Plan
© Willem-Dirk Du Toit
Continue reading "Joinery Box House / Foomann Architects"

Architecture as Propaganda? What do we do now?

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/sc/scwgvd8u5mtu0dvu.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/sc/scwgvd8u5mtu0dvu.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/sc/scwgvd8u5mtu0dvu.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/sc/scwgvd8u5mtu0dvu.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" /><em>This isn&rsquo;t a new phenomenon for 2017&ndash;see Tiananmen Square, North Korea&rsquo;s totalitarian buildings, Nazi architect Albert Speer. But this year we were reminded of architecture&rsquo;s enduring power to be used as political propaganda thanks to Trump&rsquo;s proposed border wall.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Architecture&nbsp;has played a fundamental role in the&nbsp;propagandized rhetoric&nbsp;of the Trump Administration. The aim of any kind of&nbsp;propaganda&nbsp;is to promote an idea or an ideology and Trump and his administration have used&nbsp;architecture&nbsp;to promote their own program and ideology with an unquestionable emphasis on nationalism.&nbsp;&nbsp;
How are we to look forward and discuss this appropriation of a discipline, history and study as a tool for biased and demeaning indoctrination and publicity?

Canada upscales passive house technology with the tallest building worldwide

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/sh/sh4yn0ol0t72mzmr.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/sh/sh4yn0ol0t72mzmr.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/sh/sh4yn0ol0t72mzmr.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/sh/sh4yn0ol0t72mzmr.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" /><em>In January, tenants will move into a six-storey Vancouver apartment building designed to be so energy efficient, you could&nbsp;heat each bedroom with a 100-watt light bulb. [...] Others are under construction&nbsp;and many more are at the rezoning stage, including a residence that will house 750 students at the University of Toronto's Scarborough campus and two 40-plus highrise towers in Vancouver that aim be the tallest passive house buildings in the world.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Until now most <a href="https://archinect.com/features/article/150012180/how-passive-house-design-can-propel-the-clean-energy-transition-in-architecture" rel="nofollow" >passive houses</a> have been single-family homes, but Canada is changing that. With several projects underway, architects are tackling the issues of scaling up this <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/219506/sustainable" rel="nofollow" >sustainable</a> technology for larger buildings. Without using furnaces and air conditioners, these green buildings are constructed to use up to 90% less energy than a conventional building and produce fewer greenhouse emissions.&nbsp;
One example is the University of Toronto Scarborough Campus residence, which will choose a final passive house design Continue reading "Canada upscales passive house technology with the tallest building worldwide"

Executive Objects: Minimalist Tabletop Objects That Follow a Specific Design Manifesto

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/executive-objects-minimalist-tabletop-objects-follow-specific-design-manifesto/richard-clarkson-studio-executive-objects-10/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2017/12/richard-clarkson-studio-executive-objects-10-810x540.jpg" alt="Executive Objects: Minimalist Tabletop Objects That Follow a Specific Design Manifesto" /></a>
                                <a href="https://www.richardclarkson.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Richard Clarkson Studio</a> launched a new collection of homewares called <a href="https://www.richardclarkson.com/executive-objects" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Executive Objects</a> that are made for the tabletop. The items in the collection follow a manifesto that stems from the studio’s design style and ideology, stating that each object must be:
1) minimal in style
2) geometric in form
3) honest in material
4) elegant in simplicity
5) sculptural to the core. Check out this slightly meditative video to witness the attention to the tiniest of details: Bloc is an unassuming brass square that opens bottles or can sit elegantly on your desk as a paperweight as it weighs about 15 oz (ideal for popping open a cold bottle at the end of the day). Spoke is a flat pack fruit bowl that resembles a bike wheel as its design was inspired by the spoke-hub mechanism. Poise is a self-balancing cement + brass candlestick holder that is both strong yet
Continue reading "Executive Objects: Minimalist Tabletop Objects That Follow a Specific Design Manifesto"