Single Family House on a Slope / Dost

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© Andrin Winteler | bürobuerau © Andrin Winteler | bürobuerau
  • Architects: Dost
  • Location: Merishausen, Switzerland
  • Architect In Charge: Dominic Meister
  • Area: 218.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Andrin Winteler | bürobuerau
© Andrin Winteler | bürobuerau © Andrin Winteler | bürobuerau

From the architect. This single family house is on a steep southern slope that leads to the centre of the village.
The polygonal shape of the building is determined by its pitched roof, which is set by the area’s regulations, and by its position on a hill.

Ground Floor plan Ground Floor plan

An introvert north facade contrasts strongly with the other facades, which are symmetrical and open to the views. The windows on the south, east and west façade are carefully designed and positioned in a dialogue with the slope.

© Andrin Winteler | bürobuerau © Andrin Winteler | bürobuerau
South Elevation + Section 1 South Elevation + Section 1

As for the interior, the program is split vertically: the public area is on the first floor and the private

© Andrin Winteler | bürobuerau
© Andrin Winteler | bürobuerau
Continue reading "Single Family House on a Slope / Dost"

a+u 2017:04 – MVRDV Files #3

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From the publishers. The April 2017 issue of a+u is devoted to the work of MVRDV, the architectural office based in the Netherlands. This is the third of the MVRDV FILES series by a+u, following MVRDV FILES 1 in 2002 and MVRDV FILES 2 in 2007.

As was done in the first two volumes, the projects in this issue are organized by the project number, which corresponds to the starting dates of the projects. In the past decade, MVRDV has completed some of their world-famous projects including the Book Mountain and Market Hall. These projects were featured in the second volume when they were still in the planning phase. Back then, many of us thought these projects were visionary. After 24 years since the establishment of the office, MVRDV is now realizing many of their “visions”. They believe in the positive possibilities that architecture can show to

Continue reading "a+u 2017:04 – MVRDV Files #3"

T.LOFT Experience Museum / CM design

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© Zhi Xia © Zhi Xia
  • Architects: CM design
  • Location: Futian village, ShenZhen, China
  • Design Team: Jun Liao, Danping Chen, Qingji Mao, Chong Wang, Shaofeng Zhu, Heng Yang
  • Area: 194.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Zhi Xia
© Zhi Xia © Zhi Xia
From the architect.
Village in the city - city in the village: Urban village in Shenzhen as a product of the rapid development from rural area to mega city, and in the era of the planned economy system urban and rural conflict it is also a fusion product of market economy and planned economy, high density residential environment is carrying many people's dream when they firstly arrived Shenzhen. Therefore, urban village is also an important part of city development and ecological balance.

Futian village is a typical urban village in Shenzhen. It is located in the east of Futian District, to the north is the popular digital shopping district, Huaqiang North, to the South is Huanggang area. This

Concept diagram
© Zhi Xia
axonometric diagram
programme
© Zhi Xia
© Zhi Xia
© Zhi Xia
exploded axonometric diagram
Continue reading "T.LOFT Experience Museum / CM design"

Jey Shir / Aleshtar Architectural Office

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© Parham Taghioff + Farshid Nasrabadi © Parham Taghioff + Farshid Nasrabadi
© Parham Taghioff + Farshid Nasrabadi © Parham Taghioff + Farshid Nasrabadi

From the architect. That’s really a mouthful expression but it’s true. In every corner of this historical city you can find inner beauty and jay sheer is one of this inner beauty which is in contrast to other architectural part of new and modern city of Isfahan. The reason will be unveiled to you in just a moment in the mean time let’s find out more about jay sheer.

© Parham Taghioff + Farshid Nasrabadi © Parham Taghioff + Farshid Nasrabadi

“Jay sheer” residential building is taken its name from its neighborhood “Jay Sheer”. (Jay is one of the previous historical names of Isfahan). The design of building is based on internal relationship with the traditional

© Parham Taghioff + Farshid Nasrabadi
© Parham Taghioff + Farshid Nasrabadi
Plans and Sections
Continue reading "Jey Shir / Aleshtar Architectural Office"

Floating Pavilion / Shen Ting Tseng architects

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© Shawn Liu     © Shawn Liu
  • Lighting Design: WEDO Group
  • Structural Engineer: A.S Studio
  • Kite Design And Manufacture: Buteo Huang’s Art Kite
© Shawn Liu     © Shawn Liu
Concept Concept
Concept Concept

“Floating” was a temporal architecture exhibited in the TFAM plaza which lasted for three months. The plaza is situated on the edge of urban center, adjacent to riverbank on the north side, hence causing frequent wind across the plaza. Due to the unbearable gusts of wind and subtropical sunlight on this plaza, people visiting the museum usually hurry inside the museum building, leaving the plaza a space lacking vitality.

© Shawn Liu     © Shawn Liu
© Shawn Liu     © Shawn Liu

In response to the natural feature of the site, the concept of “Floating” is derived from the attributes of wind and light. By joining

© Shawn Liu
Axonometric
© Shawn Liu
© Shawn Liu
© Shawn Liu
Detail
Continue reading "Floating Pavilion / Shen Ting Tseng architects"

Patom Organic Living / NITAPROW

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© Ketsiree Wongwan © Ketsiree Wongwan
  • Architects: NITAPROW
  • Location: 17/13 Soi Sukhumvit 49/6, Khwaeng Khlong Tan Nuea, Khet Watthana, Krung Thep Maha Nakhon 10110, Thailand
  • Design Team: Nita Yuvaboon, Prow Puttorngul
  • Area: 110.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Ketsiree Wongwan
  • Landscape Consultant: Kritsada Aunphim
  • Contractor : S.K.F. Construction Ltd., Part.
  • Client : Patom Co.,Ltd.
© Ketsiree Wongwan © Ketsiree Wongwan
Site plan Site plan

From the architect. Tucked away in Thonglor’s prime residential neighbourhood, the newly constructed building serves as a shop/showroom for Patom body care products, a small 25-seat café and a place for raising ecological awareness and sustainable living through a series of workshops and farmers market held in the garden, selling fresh produce from the local network of organic farmers.

© Ketsiree Wongwan © Ketsiree Wongwan

The small wood-framed glass building sits on a slightly raised mound covered by wild grass and ferns that naturally soften its rectangular footprint while carefully preserving an

© Ketsiree Wongwan
© Ketsiree Wongwan
© Ketsiree Wongwan
© Ketsiree Wongwan
© Ketsiree Wongwan
First floor plan
Continue reading "Patom Organic Living / NITAPROW"

Peter Cook’s Advice For Young Architects: “Get Out and Look!”

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The legendary, ever-insightful Sir Peter Cook recently shared some advice for students with Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademis Skoler for Arkitektur, Design og Konservering (KADK). Recommending ideas such as studying at two or more schools, working in at least two countries, and getting outside and simply watching people, it is clear that the key component to Sir Cook's suggestions for self-improvement as an architect is a diverse and engaged set of personal experiences. ArchDaily has also had a few opportunities to speak with Sir Cook, and just as we see in the video below, his passion and good will always shine.

The full text of Sir Cook's comments:

I think that a young architect jus starting out should go to at least two architecture schools, I think they should work in at least two different countries and I think they shouldn't just listen to what the elders tell them. I think

Continue reading "Peter Cook’s Advice For Young Architects: “Get Out and Look!”"

Tucumán Building / Garnerone + Ramos Arq

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© Walter Salcedo © Walter Salcedo
  • Architects: Garnerone + Ramos Arq
  • Location: Rosario, Santa Fe Province, Argentina
  • Architect In Charge: Garnerone Nicolás, Ramos Martín
  • Area: 500.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2015
  • Photographs: Walter Salcedo
  • Collaborators: Fidela Antelo, Ignacio Degani, Mauricio Bartocci
  • Structural: Eduardo García
  • Builder: M.E.F Terminaciones
  • Plumbing: Rossetti Sanitarios
© Walter Salcedo © Walter Salcedo

“Tucumán Building” is located within Pichincha District —four blocks from Oroño Boulevard and five blocks from Paraná River waterfront. Built on a 10 m x 17.5 m plot, this building is 13 m tall, the maximum height permitted as per Rosario’s  Urban Code. This was established for the area delimited by a special plan devised for Pichincha District, "Plan Especial Barrio Pichincha", which applies to the majority of the blocks in the area.

AXONOMETRIC 2 AXONOMETRIC 2
© Walter Salcedo © Walter Salcedo
BALCONY DETAIL BALCONY DETAIL

The starting point was the development of a plan that would conform to the morphology of the block —with only one

© Walter Salcedo
© Walter Salcedo
WALL + STAIR
© Walter Salcedo
Continue reading "Tucumán Building / Garnerone + Ramos Arq"

Adjaye Associate’s Aishti Foundation Photographed by Julien Lanoo

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© Julien Lanoo © Julien Lanoo In this series, photographer Julien Lanoo turns his camera toward Adjaye Associates' Aishti Foundation in Beirut, a shopping center and museum showcasing the private contemporary art collection of Tony Salamé, the founder of Lebanese luxury retailer Aishti.  Located on a coastal brownfield site in central Beirut, the building integrates the two distinct programs by establishing what the architects call a "celebration of views into the spaces as well as a homogenising tiled design that presents a language throughout the building’s floor, façade and roof." Interior spaces are organized around a reflective central atrium, while an undulating landscape along the water reclaims seaside public space, and opens up views over the city of Beirut. Check out the full photoset, below.
© Julien Lanoo © Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo © Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo © Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo © Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo © Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo © Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo © Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo © Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo © Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo ©
© Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo
Continue reading "Adjaye Associate’s Aishti Foundation Photographed by Julien Lanoo"

The Saint George College’s Gymnasium / Gonzalo Mardones V. Arquitectos

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© Nico Saieh © Nico Saieh
  • Engineering Calculators: Ruiz y Saavedra Ingenieros.
  • Lighting: Paulina Sir.
  • Technical Inspection: Juan Eduardo Mujica.
  • Constructor: Proyekta
  • Landscaping: Go Green.
  • Client: Colegio Saint George.
© Nico Saieh © Nico Saieh
© Nico Saieh © Nico Saieh

From the architect. The Saint George´s College is located at the foothills of Cerro Manquehue, in the Vitacura neighbourhood, Santiago de Chile, in the middle of a forest that is maintained thanks to the microclimate of a place enclosed under the hill. This school, designed in the 70's by the architect Gustavo Munizaga, responds to a campus typology, with programmatic volumes scattered among the trees, covering the entire terrain and having the hill always present as a backdrop. The original idea takes the option

© Nico Saieh
© Nico Saieh
Roof Plan - Exterior Courts
Section
© Nico Saieh
© Skye Chapman
Section
1st Underground Leve Plan
© Skye Chapman
© Nico Saieh
© Nico Saieh
© Nico Saieh
Continue reading "The Saint George College’s Gymnasium / Gonzalo Mardones V. Arquitectos"

Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture to Change Name with New Branding

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Following a successful several-year long campaign to maintain its accreditation as an institute of higher learning, the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture has announced a name change and rebranding, as part of efforts stipulated by the Higher Learning Commission to distance itself from the larger Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. As a nod to the institution’s origins as Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin Fellowship, the school will now be known as the School of Architecture at Taliesin.

via Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation via Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

“Adopting this new name, the School of Architecture at Taliesin, helps us to secure our identity as an experimental, forward-looking architecture program that is deeply rooted in the Taliesin Fellowship,” said Aaron Betsky, dean of the School.  “The process in which we developed our new relationship with the Foundation and our accreditors has been an opportunity to closely examine who we are as a school and

via Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation
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Emerge / Jason Griffiths and College of Architecture – University of Nebraska-Lincoln

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© Mike Lundgren                © Mike Lundgren
  • Architects: Jason Griffiths, College of Architecture - University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Location: Eugene, OR, United States
  • Architect In Charge: Assistant Professor Jason Griffiths - TEAM: David Rogelio Alcala , Alfredo Vera F, Virginia Michelle Gormley, Ruslan White, Eric Lee Engler, Danielle Alexa Durham, Devin Bayles McLean, Scott Christopher Kenny, Justin Philip DeFields, Darian Johnathon Scott, Kristen Michelle Schulte, Joseph Roy Croghan, Hanna Christy
  • Area: 100.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Mike Lundgren
  • Structural Engineer: PCS Structural
  • Contractor: Justin Austen Design
  • Clients: Bauman Tree Farm
  • Clt: D.R. Johnson
  • Advisor: Kim Larkin MXD Arts
Diagram Diagram

“Emerge” is a one hundred square foot structure designed to hold small gatherings of teachers and students visiting the Bauman Tree Farm. It is a collaboration between the College of Architecture at the University Lincoln-Nebraska, the tree farm, and The DR Johnson Lumber Mill. 

© Mike Lundgren                © Mike Lundgren
Section Section

Emerge is located within

© Mike Lundgren
Diagram
Diagram
© Mike Lundgren
© Mike Lundgren
© Mike Lundgren
Continue reading "Emerge / Jason Griffiths and College of Architecture – University of Nebraska-Lincoln"

3:2 House / Método

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©  Tatiana Mestre © Tatiana Mestre
  • Architects: Método
  • Location: Mexico City, CDMX, México
  • Architect In Charge: Arquitecto Bernardo García
  • Area: 470.0 m2
  • Year Project: 2014
  • Photography : Tatiana Mestre
  • Constructor: PGM Arquitectura
©  Tatiana Mestre © Tatiana Mestre

From the architect. Architecture is a snapshot of our current way of living. It is a synthesis of humanity in a time specific period. After the industrial revolution with the increasing reproduction of mass media, the introduction of new materials and new ways of transportation; the idea of a traditional interior space was transformed into a dialogue between interior and exterior. This change also challenged the boundaries of private and public spaces.  

©  Tatiana Mestre © Tatiana Mestre
Elevation Elevation
©  Tatiana Mestre © Tatiana Mestre

3:2 House has the intention to question the physical and visual boundaries of space in single family housing. We pretend to create a visually continuous and connected area that is limited by a gradient boundary –rather than

©  Tatiana Mestre
©  Tatiana Mestre
Diagram
©  Tatiana Mestre
Continue reading "3:2 House / Método"

7 of MIT Labs’ Best Ideas for Future Cities

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"/> Future cities have captured our imaginations for centuries. From Thomas F. Anderson’s 1900 vision for a Future Boston, through Le Corbusier’s 1924 Ville Radieuse, to modern ‘future-proof’ cities such as Songdo, South Korea, architects and town planners have considered how cities will respond to the movement of people, capital, technology, and ideas. Today, groups such as the Senseable City Laboratory at MIT have been created with the goal of suggesting ideas for the city of tomorrow. Through a technique known as ‘Futurecraft’, the Senseable City Lab places the designer in a possible future environment and asks them to generate design proposals which could enhance daily life. As we are about to see, some of their ideas would make heads turn even in a galaxy far far away.

HubCab

Imagine a city where an autonomous vehicle, such as those being developed by Google and Uber, will drop you to your office at 9am, drive other citizens to doctor appointments, university lectures and lunchtime meetings, and return to the office at 5pm to drive you home. Shared mobility was central to the Senseable City Lab's 2014 HubCab experiment. Over the course of a year, the Lab tracked 150 million taxi journeys across New York City in order to identify commuter patterns and develop an efficient car share system. The Lab estimates that improved transport sharing technology could potentially reduce the number of taxi journeys by 40%, thus cutting congestion and emissions, and saving people time and money. If cities embraced the concept of shared mobility, four out of every five private vehicles could be taken off city streets, leading to faster journey times, less noise and cleaner air. Given that the average city car is idle for 95%-99% of the day, new sites once occupied by car parks would become available for development. With the success of car-sharing companies such as ZipCar and DriveNow, the clean, efficient, peaceful smart city of shared mobility may be on the horizon. Learn more about HubCab by the MIT Senseable City Lab here.

Roboat

Roboat. Image Courtesy of MIT Senseable City Lab Roboat. Image Courtesy of MIT Senseable City Lab

Perhaps autonomous cars are last week’s news. Instead, the Senseable City Lab has partnered with the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions to design the world’s first fleet of autonomous boats. Many of the world’s largest cities were built with rivers and canals as their lifeblood. Senseable City Lab imagines a future scenario where these waterways are alive with ‘roboats’ transporting goods and people, creating self-assembly bridges, and forming pop up interventions such as concert stages.  Furthermore, these boats can monitor the city’s water creating literal streams of information about urban and human health. Learn more about Roboats by the MIT Senseable City Lab here.

Trash Track

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With the rapid development of micro-computing in mind, Senseable City Lab imagined a future where micro-technology was so small and cheap that every object could be geo-tracked.  In a 2009 experiment dubbed Trash Track, the Lab recruited hundreds of volunteers to place geo-locating tags in rubbish bins across Seattle. The experiment revealed a chronically complex disposal chain crossing the United States, leading to major improvements by waste management providers.  A future city of smart rubbish could promote behavioral change amongst citizens, optimize and manage disposal chains, and if taken to an international level, could combat illegal exports of hazardous electronic waste worth 3.75 billion US dollars.  Learn more about Trash Track by the MIT Senseable City Lab here.

Local Warming

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Every evening, energy is wasted on heating empty rooms inside and lighting empty streets outside. Too often, our environment is optimized for potential habitation, whether in use or not. Therefore, consider a future in which an ‘energy cloud’ follows every citizen. The Senseable City Lab proposes a future city where wifi-enabled “responsive infrared heating elements” in every room are activated and deactivated by motion detectors, merging thermal comfort with energy efficiency. The idea was showcased by Senseable City Lab at the 2014 Venice Biennale, under the title Local Warming. Learn more about Local Warming by the MIT Senseable City Lab here.

Treepedia

Treepedia. Image Courtesy of MIT Senseable City Lab Treepedia. Image Courtesy of MIT Senseable City Lab

The green canopy plays an important role in urban life, with trees helping to mitigate extreme temperatures, provide natural respite from traffic, noise, and congestion, and improve the quality of our urban environment. Despite this, the average citizen is often removed from the understanding and development of their environmental habitat.  In response, the Senseable City Lab have developed an innovative metric called the ‘Green View Index’, using Google Street View panoramas to evaluate and compare green canopy coverage in major cities. Through monitoring the urban tree coverage, citizens and planners can see which areas in their city are green and not green, compare their green canopy with other cities, and play a more active role in enhancing their local environment. Treepedia will continue to expand in more municipalities across the globe. In the future, users will be able to add unique tree information on an open-source street map and engage with officials to advocate for further planting in particular areas. Learn more about Treepedia by the MIT Senseable City Lab here.

Light Traffic

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Senseable City Lab, in collaboration with the Swiss Institute of Technology (ETHZ), and the Italian National Research Council (CNR) have developed slot-based intersections that could replace traditional traffic lights, significantly reducing queues and delays. In the concept known as Light Traffic, sensor-laden vehicles pass through intersections by communicating and remaining at a safe distance from each other, rather than grinding to a halt at traffic lights. In dense urban areas, the system can be designed to accommodate pedestrian and bicycle crossing with vehicular traffic. Learn more about Light Traffic by the MIT Senseable City Lab here.

Boston 3-1-1

Boston 3-1-1. Image Courtesy of MIT Senseable City Lab Boston 3-1-1. Image Courtesy of MIT Senseable City Lab
Like computers, cities will only be as smart as the people who use them. The city of tomorrow will undoubtedly be a convergence of bits and atoms, where the virtual and physical are entwined. WikiCitizens will be connected to their city, and to each other, in real time.  As virtual and social technologies develop, apps and tools are emerging which allow citizens to play an active role in the maintenance of their city. The Senseable City Lab have developed the Boston 3-1-1 app, providing Boston's citizens with a platform for reporting social and infrastructural issues like potholes, graffiti, and litter. As digital platforms are integrated into the urban environment, citizens could design, operate, and adjust the cities of tomorrow.     Learn more about Boston 3-1-1 by the MIT Senseable City Lab here. All concepts and images via: MIT Senseable City Lab.
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Step Up Your Sketches With These Basic Principles Of Two-Point Perspective

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You may know about Lynda.com, the online education platform that hosts thousands of video courses for learning how to use software. But did you know that Lynda also has some great drawing, animation, and design courses? The best part (if you're a current student or local library card owner)? Lynda can be accessed for free from many universities, colleges, and libraries! If your backpack-toting, library-visiting days are behind you, the platform offers a free 10-day trial.  If you're looking to perfect your ability to capture or project building interiors and exteriors, Amy Wynne's hour-long course "Drawing 2-Point Perspective" is a solid option.  In the course description, Wynne explains:
In our street scenes, we'll place windows and doors on our buildings and learn how to believably place trees and sidewalks in perspective. We'll also learn additional strategies for creating depth in your drawings as well as how to make a
Continue reading "Step Up Your Sketches With These Basic Principles Of Two-Point Perspective"

Benoit&Roselyne / DIXNEUFCENTQUATREVINGTSIX

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© Florian Kleinefenn © Florian Kleinefenn
© Florian Kleinefenn © Florian Kleinefenn
Roof Plan Roof Plan

From the architect. This typical house of the Gard, wedged in between vegetation and hillside, stands on a lot that has been separated into three levels of terraces held in place by dry stone retaining

© Florian Kleinefenn © Florian Kleinefenn

The extension added to this house, which until recently only served as second home, had to enable Benoît and Roselyne to host their children, grandchildren and friends. A monolithic and sculptural concrete volume rises from this landscape of greenery and limestone, resonating with the genie of this place, a former quarry.

Axonometric View Axonometric View

This volume has been designed to allow the interplay of light and shadow to reveal its facetted form and to assert its presence and contemporary look without negating

© Florian Kleinefenn
© Florian Kleinefenn
© Florian Kleinefenn
© Florian Kleinefenn
Section
Continue reading "Benoit&Roselyne / DIXNEUFCENTQUATREVINGTSIX"

a+u 2017:03 – Herzog & de Meuron’s Hamburg Elbphilharmonie

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From the publishers. The March 2017 issue of a+u is a special issue dedicated to the Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg by Herzog & de Meuron. We invited the architects as guest editors to collaborate with us in documenting the entire process from the very beginning, in 2001, up to the opening concert in January 2017.

In addition to the main body of this issue introducing—with plenty of photos, drawings, and text by architectural journalist Gerhard Mack—from concept inception, site analysis, initial design, design development, construction and media reception, the issue features photo essays by photographers Joël Tettamanti and Armin Linke, an essay by Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron, an epilogue by Erwin J. S. Viray.

Contents

Single family House – Tolstoi str. / Outline Architecture Office

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© Sorin Diaconescu © Sorin Diaconescu
  • Architects: Outline Architecture Office
  • Location: Strada Lev Nicolaevici Tolstoi, București, Romania
  • Architect In Charge: Cristina Barna, Sorin Diaconescu
  • Area: 386.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Sorin Diaconescu
© Sorin Diaconescu © Sorin Diaconescu

From the architect. From a functional point of view the brief and the relative small area of the plot imposed a vertical development of the structure. The house is designed for a young family of four, and applies the organisation principles of a single storey residence to the vertical condition of the site. 

© Sorin Diaconescu © Sorin Diaconescu

The general principle in arranging the interior spaces was to visually connect them and to keep an easy access between adjacent rooms placed on platforms half a storey vertically separated. The rooms themselves can be opened and extended into this circulation through sliding or folding partitions, adding to the overall connectivity. The brief also included an elevator that connects

© Sorin Diaconescu
Section
3D Section
© Sorin Diaconescu
© Sorin Diaconescu
Continue reading "Single family House – Tolstoi str. / Outline Architecture Office"

The Barn / ZIEGLER Antonin architecte

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© David Boureau © David Boureau
© Antonin Ziegler  © Antonin Ziegler

From the architect. In the Regional Natural Park of Boucles de la Seine, a barn in ruins was reconverted into a place of residence. Abandoned at the edge of the river, it used to hold the fodder for the haulage horses. Its thin weatherboarding had been worn away over time – only the timber framework remained.

© Antonin Ziegler  © Antonin Ziegler

A building lost in the wheat fields facing the river... In this very simple, rural context, the Project intends to be just as rustic, without sophistication or details. The new shelter was built onto the existing one. A shell of zinc covers the roof and walls to conserve a monolithic, agricultural architecture with few openings.

© David Boureau © David Boureau
Exploded View
© David Boureau
© David Boureau
Transversal Section
Technical Section
© Antonin Ziegler
© Antonin Ziegler
Continue reading "The Barn / ZIEGLER Antonin architecte"