The Medusae and the Migrant: Ala Tannir on the Ecology of Crisis in the Mediterranean

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/10/105d76d76d4cdd19b9cecc75cde2ae6c.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><p>Since the beginning of 2018 alone, 857 people have <a href="https://missingmigrants.iom.int/region/mediterranean" >died</a> attempting to cross the Mediterranean &mdash; more than five per day &mdash; fleeing war, political repression, economic hardship, and ecological crises. It is the deadliest migration route in the world. While the internal borders of the European Union have been made increasingly porous since the early 1990&rsquo;s, the external borders have been progressively closed off, leaving the sea as the primary path to asylum. But the waters are rough, and migrants are often crammed on overpacked, unseaworthy vessels by opportunistic smugglers. Armed with remote sensing technologies, policing missions sent by the European states send many boats back. Others sink. Rescues &mdash; mandated by international maritime law &mdash; have become less and less frequent as European countries have instituted a complex set of laws that provide loopholes allowing the abdication of their responsibility. Nearly one in every fifty migrants attempting the <!--more--> does not make it.</p>...           

Call for Submissions now open for ‘Ed’ #3: Normal!

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/7d/7d2509823391ddcd96ed663f04900498.gif" border="0" />Architecture isn&rsquo;t normal. We take for a given that architecture has to operate the way it already does &mdash; but it doesn&rsquo;t. What appears as natural is in fact constructed, and has mutated dramatically through time. &ldquo;Architecture,&rdquo; that is, refers not just to the practice of building but also to a set of institutionalized social and labor relations, which are often misogynistic, racist, corrupt, and oppressive. For far too long, we&rsquo;ve accepted workplaces where women are mistreated, harassed, assaulted. We&rsquo;ve accepted the exclusion of people of color from our ranks and as our clients. We&rsquo;ve accepted exploitation of workers and cyclical systems of abuse. We&rsquo;ve accepted as the ideal of our profession an image of the architect&mdash;and the client&mdash;that is white, that is cis male, that is straight, that is able bodied, that is rich. We have to, urgently, denormalize these norms of the architectural profession and discipline.
While architecture Continue reading "Call for Submissions now open for ‘Ed’ #3: Normal!"

Archinect is pleased to release Ed #2 "Architecture of Disaster"!

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/7q/7qo4s5q4xdngdwmj.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />After months of hard work <a href="https://archinect.com/news/article/150038649/call-for-submissions-now-open-for-ed-2-disaster" rel="nofollow" >reviewing submissions</a>, selecting content, <a href="https://archinect.com/nicholaskorody" rel="nofollow" >editing</a>, <a href="http://folder.studio/" rel="nofollow" >designing</a> and working with the best printers in the industry, we're excited to announce the second issue of <a href="https://ed.archinect.com/" rel="nofollow" >Ed</a>, "Architecture of Disaster," is now available for purchase. If you're an annual subscriber, your copy has either arrived at your doorstep or is on its way. For everyone else, you can order now, from <a href="https://ed.archinect.com/purchase" rel="nofollow" >our revamped online shop</a>. Copies will be available at selected <a href="https://ed.archinect.com/stockists" rel="nofollow" >stockists</a> shortly, including the soon-to-open Archinect Outpost, our experimental retail/gallery/event space in downtown LA's Arts District.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br>
Get your copy of Ed #2 "Architecture of Disaster" here!

“The disaster ruins everything, all the while leaving everything intact.”

  • Maurice Blanchot, The Writing of the Disaster
It’s four in the morning and I can’t sleep. I keep thinking about the disaster. Which one? The storm in the Caribbean? Or the ones in the Southeast Continue reading "Archinect is pleased to release Ed #2 "Architecture of Disaster"!"

Digital Library, Analog Building: The Story of Rand Hall (Chapter 4)

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ka/karg1qiqo4h4gc1t.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>Chapter 4: Second Action Second Renovation</em>
Rooms for data processor and faculty offices were installed on the first floor of Rand Hall for the Cornell Computer Center in 1959. Additional interior walls were erected to expand the office spaces on the west end of the second floor of Rand Hall. Today, the digitized collection of the entire library can be contained within the memory of a hard drive smaller than the size of a single book. But in 1959, the physical space required by a digitized library would have occupied more area than a traditional library of book stacks containing the same amount of information.

Deadline for Ed #2 ‘Disaster’ submissions extended until January 30

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/lk/lkdy077th8j7xtf8.gif" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" />With 2017 in the rearview mirror, <em><a href="https://ed.archinect.com/" rel="nofollow" >Ed</a></em> wanted to take stock of where we are and where we&rsquo;re going. But despite our best attempts at optimism, things didn&rsquo;t look so hot. Our rents are rising. The climate is getting crazy. Nuclear war seems right around the corner. It began to feel like the only thing we can depend on is our monthly student loan bill. That is, we couldn&rsquo;t help but notice that we&rsquo;re in the middle of a sh*tstorm.
For our second issue, Ed is trying to grapple with the seemingly widespread sense that things are bad and probably getting worse. That is, we’re trying to think about architecture and disasters: How does architecture play a role in creating disasters? How can architecture help mitigate them? Are there such things as disasters in architecture itself? What even qualifies as a disaster anyway?
Credit: KC Green
Late last year, Continue reading "Deadline for Ed #2 ‘Disaster’ submissions extended until January 30"

Call for Submissions now open for ‘Ed’ #2: Disaster!

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/g0/g0gt4undvukndlq6.gif" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" />The last few months alone have seen cataclysmic storms devastate the Caribbean, the Southeast United States, India, Bangladesh, and Nepal, while intense wildfires have scorched Southern California, the Pacific Northwest, Southern Europe, North Africa, and Central and South Africa. The effects of climate change, it would seem, are ramping up. And, alongside extreme weather, related resource-driven conflicts are multiplying across the world, from Syria to Somalia. With more than half the world&rsquo;s population living in cities, a majority of which are along waterways and coastlines, built environments not designed to accommodate rising tides or other environmental crises are being tested. In short, we live in a world marked by disasters. The foundations upon which we build are shaking; the ground has been revealed as unstable. What is the role of architecture in all this? How does it contribute to disaster scenarios? How can it mitigate the effects of a warming <!--more-->?
But this climate of...

A House Without A Hierarchy

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/43/43qrm7odo42l3rmn.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/43/43qrm7odo42l3rmn.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/43/43qrm7odo42l3rmn.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/43/43qrm7odo42l3rmn.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" />Born out of the 2008 financial crash, the Barcelona-based studio <a href="https://archinect.com/firms/cover/63135925/maio" >MAIO</a> cares less about form (although their forms are striking) and more about the politics of practice. At the heart of their work is the idea that architecture must change over time to keep up with mutating social and behavioral patterns. Their practice involves extensive research in order to find loopholes in the existing system that can be utilized to make architecture that, simply, works better. For example, with their first ground-up built project <em>110 Rooms</em>, the studio developed a floor plan comprising uniform-sized rooms so that residents could use as them as they see fit rather than conforming to predetermined programs. After all, the typical father-mother-children family is not so typical anymore. MAIO is helping architecture catch up.
In this feature from the first issue of Archinect's new print publication Ed, we talk with the studio about  Continue reading "A House Without A Hierarchy"

Get your copy of the first issue of Ed, Archinect’s new print journal!

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/wy/wyku287490b91agm.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/wy/wyku287490b91agm.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/wy/wyku287490b91agm.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/wy/wyku287490b91agm.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" />Archinect is pleased to announce the release of the inaugural issue of <em><a href="https://ed.archinect.com/" rel="nofollow" >Ed</a></em>, our <a href="https://archinect.com/features/article/150005614/why-we-re-starting-a-print-magazine-after-20-years-of-publishing-digitally" rel="nofollow" >new print publication</a>. The first issue focuses on &ldquo;The Architecture of Architecture&rdquo;&mdash;how architecture is constitutively enmeshed within ecologies, economies, socio-politics, technological regimes, and patriarchal structures. In the issue, some of the most innovative voices in contemporary architecture take a look at how this operates, and how it can be redesigned. In short, &ldquo;The Architecture of Architecture&rdquo; endeavors to sketch out the limits of contemporary architectural practice and thought, and to imagine alternatives.
Conceived of as a thought-provoking journal wrapped in a visually-rich magazine, the issue features a conversation with the Barcelona-based studio MAIO about their first ground-up project, as well as an interview with the artist Martin Beck by Amelia Stein, and a special iteration of Archinect’s recurring interview series Small Studio Snapshots featuring Brandão Costa Arquitectos. Alongs...

Apple’s Jony Ive, considered a "poet" by Norman Foster, discusses the architecture of Apple’s new campus

            <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/8a/8aqsfnip844lv085.jpg" width="650" height="757" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Apple Park is unlike any other product Ive has worked on. There will be only one campus&mdash;in contrast to the ubiquity of Apple&rsquo;s phones and computers&mdash;and it doesn&rsquo;t fit in a pocket or a hand. Yet Ive applied the same design process he brings to technological devices: prototyping to minimize any issues with the end result and to narrow what he calls the delta between the vision and the reality of a project.</p></em><br /><br /><p><em>&ldquo;A lot of the buildings that are being built at the moment are products of software-only cultures,&rdquo; says Ive. &ldquo;Because we understand making, we&rsquo;ll build [a prototype] and try it and use it, and see what works and what doesn&rsquo;t.&rdquo;</em></p>            

Artist Rachel Whiteread creates two "ghost" cabins in the desert outside of Los Angeles

            <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/9w/9w81bj6z3t97grdx.jpg" width="650" height="445" border="0" title="" alt="" />Rachel Whiteread is known for her architecturally-relevant art practice, in particular her casts of the inside of buildings. One such sculpture, a cast of a Victorian townhouse, helped secure her the Turner Prize, making her the first woman to ever win the illustrious award.<br>
The London-based artist has reprised this strategy for two installations in the California High Desert, which are featured in The Wall Street Journal. Located near Joshua Tree National Park, her concrete sculptures reveal the negative space of small cabins from the 1950s that had been left in the desert.
Photography by Iwan Baan for WSJ. Magazine
These aren’t the only sculptures to have recently touched down in the arid landscape outside of Los Angeles. A slew of artists, including Doug Aitken, gathered together a couple months ago to create Desert X, which was something of a festival of contemporary, site-specific works.

This Russian farmer built a stadium out of straw to satirize the new Zenit Arena in Saint Petersburg

            <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/ij/ije1fsy1ylv8fabe.jpg" width="650" height="276" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em>A farmer in Russia has built a football stadium out of straw to mock the ballooning cost and corruption surrounding the construction of St Petersburg&rsquo;s Zenit Arena, recently opened for the 2018 World Cup.
Although the straw version in the Stavropol region lacks the extra-terrestrial elegance of the Kisho Kurokawa’s design, and while its seating capacity is rather less than 68,000, it was a great deal cheaper: $673 compared with the original’s $720m.



Here's an image of the IRL Zenit Arena:
And here's a video of the construction of the straw parody:

This Man Designed an AI to Generate British Placenames

            <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/7q/7qbutl3adtnbrjp9.jpg" width="650" height="488" border="0" title="" alt="" />As any American who tuned into the last British election realized, UK placenames are a bit out there (at least to American ears, that is), from Droop in Dorset to Westward Ho! in Devon. So Dan Ho decided to train a (quirky) AI to generate its own.&nbsp;
Here are some of the ones the computer crafted:
  • Ospley
  • Stoke Carrston
  • Elfordbion
  • Hevermilley
  • Ell
  • Elle’s Chorels
  • Capton Briins Forehouint Eftte Green
  • Waryburn Torner Midlwood
  • Wasts Halkstack
  • Kinindworthorpe Marmile
  • Dompton Ole
  • Dimmer Common
  • Pairinggleat
  • Catley Holtbridgeham Ruse
  • Colon-in Mead
Check out the full list, as well as how he did it, here.

Shane Williamson appointed director of University of Toronto Daniels Master of Architecture program

            <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/31/31gz2zekfl2n2giu.jpg" width="650" height="390" border="0" title="" alt="" /><a href="http://archinect.com/schools/release/294/lecture-video-shane-williamson-incremental/141213083" rel="nofollow" >Shane Williamson</a>, currently an Associate Professor, has been appointed Director of the <a href="http://archinect.com/news/tag/21687/university-of-toronto" rel="nofollow" >University of Toronto</a> Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design Master of Architecture Program, effective starting July 1, 2017.&nbsp;
Williamson is known for his built, projected, and speculative work, much of which involves using advanced digital tools as the means to “critically engage/transform traditional modes of construction and tectonic expression,” states the press release. “His work seeks to situate digital fabrication and wood construction in a broader cultural context and link theories of design and technology to sustainable building strategies.” Williamson is also the Principal of Williamson Williamson Inc., a Toronto -based studio that does work across a variety of scales, from furniture design to master planning. “Williamson brings with him his interest in our Master of Architecture program’s relationship to the City of Toronto and the broader profession, and his focus on th...

Lower Manhattan is quickly becoming the epicenter of the New York architecture scene

            <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/p2/p2lbakrm8igmzat8.jpg" width="650" height="433" border="0" title="" alt="" />According to <em><a href="https://therealdeal.com/2017/07/14/the-design-district-more-than-100-architecture-engineering-firms-relocated-to-lower-manhattan/" rel="nofollow" >The Real Deal</a></em>, the center of the New York architecture world is heading south, with over 100 architecture and engineering firms concentrated in Lower Manhattan. Nearly half of them moved there in the last decade or so, while others&mdash;like SOM and AECOM&mdash;settled in the area even earlier.
Apparently, a lot of the firms were once in Midtown South and SoHo, but rising rents forced them out. In fact, 10 of the 15 architecture firms that relocated to Lower Manhattan in 2014 were coming from the former. That’s because, in part, rents jumped a solid 13% each year between 2010 and 2013 in Midtown South—the “most expensive major market in the nation,” according to Tristan Ashby of JLL. Other forces driving architecture down into the lower reaches of Manhattan include easy access to mass transit as well as an influx of new restaurants. But it’s not clear how Continue reading "Lower Manhattan is quickly becoming the epicenter of the New York architecture scene"

MAD designs a futuristic new campus for Faraday Future

            <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/7o/7otljcinrayri2y6.jpg" width="650" height="867" border="0" title="" alt="" />Appropriate to its sci-fi ambitions and branding, <a href="http://archinect.com/news/tag/730858/faraday-future" rel="nofollow" >Faraday Future</a> has enlisted <a href="http://archinect.com/firms/cover/1276712/mad-architects" rel="nofollow" >MAD</a> to design a new campus that suggests &ldquo;extraterrestrial objects capable of de-familiarizing employees and prospective clients with the status quo of the contemporary automotive market.&rdquo;
Sited on Mare Island in Northern California, the campus will cover approximately 130,000 square meters, of which 20,000 square meters will be buildings. Specifically, the campus features two low, metallic structures as well as a “user experience center” comprising a sculptural reflective tower. From its heights, clients can watch as their car is transported from a warehouse to an exhibition hall via an elevated light rail. Non-client visitors will also be able to visit the experience center.
Image Courtesy of MAD Architects
Image Courtesy of MAD Architects
Image Courtesy of MAD Architects
The site, which used to be a naval base, will have a double-height facility punctured by a series of internal Continue reading "MAD designs a futuristic new campus for Faraday Future"

SOM wins competition to design a new master plan for the Colombo Port City in Sri Lanka

            <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/df/dfbea4k7xnqvo3wj.jpg" width="650" height="488" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>SOM has won (yet another) major commission: the master plan for Colombo Port City in Sri Lanka. Covering a 269 hectare site, the master plan is for a new city development that will extend the existing Colombo Central Business District. The project, which is designed in collaboration with Grant Associates landscape architecture, is intended to respond to the sensitive ecology of the area, an d includes canal edges, new gardens, a new harbor, and a new city park.</p>          

SOM wins competition to design a new master plan for the Colombo Port City in Sri Lanka

            <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/df/dfbea4k7xnqvo3wj.jpg" width="650" height="488" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>SOM has won (yet another) major commission: the master plan for Colombo Port City in Sri Lanka. Covering a 269 hectare site, the master plan is for a new city development that will extend the existing Colombo Central Business District. The project, which is designed in collaboration with Grant Associates landscape architecture, is intended to respond to the sensitive ecology of the area, an d includes canal edges, new gardens, a new harbor, and a new city park.</p>          

SOM wins competition to design a new master plan for the Colombo Port City in Sri Lanka

            <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/df/dfbea4k7xnqvo3wj.jpg" width="650" height="488" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>SOM has won (yet another) major commission: the master plan for Colombo Port City in Sri Lanka. Covering a 269 hectare site, the master plan is for a new city development that will extend the existing Colombo Central Business District. The project, which is designed in collaboration with Grant Associates landscape architecture, is intended to respond to the sensitive ecology of the area, an d includes canal edges, new gardens, a new harbor, and a new city park.</p>          

SOM wins competition to design a new masterplan for the Colombo Port City in Sri Lanka

            <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/df/dfbea4k7xnqvo3wj.jpg" width="650" height="488" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>SOM has won (yet another) major commission: the master plan for Colombo Port City in Sri Lanka. Covering a 269 hectare site, the master plan is for a new city development that will extend the existing Colombo Central Business District. The project, which is designed in collaboration with Grant Associates landscape architecture, is intended to respond to the sensitive ecology of the area, an d includes canal edges, new gardens, a new harbor, and a new city park.</p>          

Cuba to bring back hourly rental "love hotels"

            <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/nj/nj6lon89frndm3ml.jpg" width="650" height="434" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The authorities in the Cuban capital, Havana, say they are restoring a network of hotels where rooms are rented by the hour to lovers.
State-run "posadas", or love motels, disappeared during Cuba's economic crisis in the 1990s, when they became hurricane shelters. Private householders filled the gap in the market, but at exorbitant prices. Officials say the posadas will be cheaper and will help end the practice of love-making in Havana's open spaces.