Bjarke Ingels: “New York is not the Capital of the United States. It is a Capital of the World.”

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Since moving to New York in 2010, BIG founder Bjarke Ingels has built an impressive portfolio, from developed projects such as VIA 57 West and The Eleventh to propositions such as West 29th Street and The Spiral. In a new interview with Louisiana Channel, Ingels steps back from the pragmatism of individual projects, and instead reflects on his view of New York, from multiculturalism and inequality to regeneration and skyscrapers.
The Spiral by BIG. Image © Tishman Speyer The Spiral by BIG. Image © Tishman Speyer
The Spiral by BIG. Image © Tishman Speyer The Spiral by BIG. Image © Tishman Speyer

When you look at this manmade mountain range behind me, it is a product of accumulation, congregations, business, commerce, etc, and every individual building in its own right is perhaps not particularly interesting. It is often very pragmatic and straightforward parameters that have shaped each building, but together the sum of the parts becomes something majestic and awe-inspiring, and speaks to the power

VIA 57 West by BIG. Image © Iwan Baan
VIA 57 West by BIG. Image © Iwan Baan
VIA 57 West by BIG. Image © Nic Lehoux
VIA 57 West by BIG. Image © Nic Lehoux
2 World Trade Center by BIG. Image © DBOX, Courtesy of BIG
2 World Trade Center by BIG. Image © DBOX, Courtesy of BIG
West 29th Street . Image via NY YIMBY
West 29th Street . Image via NY YIMBY
Plans for the BIG U. Image Courtesy of rebuildbydesign.org
Plans for the BIG U. Image Courtesy of rebuildbydesign.org
The Eleventh by BIG. Image © Andrew Campbell Nelson
The High Line by James Corner Field Operations with Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image © Iwan Baan
Plans for the BIG U. Image Courtesy of rebuildbydesign.org
Continue reading "Bjarke Ingels: “New York is not the Capital of the United States. It is a Capital of the World.”"

The Deadly Genoa Bridge Collapse was Predicted, and Avoidable

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Image: said.touama. <a href='https://www.instagram.com/p/BmdtD8BHtuY/'>Via Instagram</a> Image: said.touama. <a href='https://www.instagram.com/p/BmdtD8BHtuY/'>Via Instagram</a> 39 people are now reported to have died following the collapse of the Morandi motorway bridge in Genoa, Italy. The incident happened on Tuesday 14th August, when one of the bridge’s structural components, comprising of pre-stressed concrete stays and trestles, collapsed onto a railway line and warehouse 150 feet (45 meters) below. The cause of the collapse is not yet known, however, attention is now turning to the bridge’s maintenance record, concerns of its integrity stretching back decades, and how the collapse sits within the broader context of aging Italian infrastructure.
Image: freaklancecrew. <a href='https://www.instagram.com/p/Bmds4Q9H6_8/'>Via Instagram</a> Image: freaklancecrew. <a href='https://www.instagram.com/p/Bmds4Q9H6_8/'>Via Instagram</a>

Over the last decade, the 1967 Morandi Bridge has been under constant maintenance, with a 2011 report by the Italian highways operator Autostade per l’Italia warning of the structure’s “intense decay.” Local residents have long observed maintenance work on the bridge

Image: amansachdev. <a href='https://www.instagram.com/p/BmduM_LBEIl/'>Via Instagram</a>
Continue reading "The Deadly Genoa Bridge Collapse was Predicted, and Avoidable"

AIA Outlines Initiatives in Response to Rise in School Shootings

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Perspective of the New Sandy Hook School. Image © Svigals + Partners Perspective of the New Sandy Hook School. Image © Svigals + Partners The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has issued a statement outlining its new initiatives in response to the rising tide of school shootings in the United States. The statement, titled “Where we stand: School design and student safety,” outlines four paths of action the Institute intends to take to support architects and school communities. While not containing a detailed policy to tackle the ongoing crisis, the AIA statement commits to updating school design guidelines, supporting education to achieve safe school design, making safe school design eligible for federal grants, and establishing a federal clearinghouse on school design.
Perspective of the New Sandy Hook School. Image © Svigals + Partners Perspective of the New Sandy Hook School. Image © Svigals + Partners

Over the course of almost two decades, architects have worked with school communities across the country in response to repeated acts of deadly violence targeting students and educators. Architects

Perspective of the New Sandy Hook School. Image © Svigals + Partners
Sandy Hook Memorial. Image © SWA Group
Continue reading "AIA Outlines Initiatives in Response to Rise in School Shootings"

How is Burning Man Built?

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Satellite Image. Image © NASA Satellite Image. Image © NASA Ever wonder how Burning Man’s famous Black Rock City rises from the dust of the Nevada Desert every year? A video by vlogger Shalaco Sching offers an insight, documenting the process undertaken by the team of surveyors tasked with creating a temporary city from scratch, year after year. As Shalaco documents through his video below, his Instagram, and a written account on the Burning Man Journal, a team of 21 surveyors spend seven days laying the lines and waypoints of a 5.62-mile plan, creating the largest and most iconic art installation at Burning Man – the city itself.
© Shalaco Sching © Shalaco Sching
© Shalaco Sching © Shalaco Sching

The process of building Black Rock City centers on “The Golden Spike,” a center point of the city plan. From there, the “lines” of the settlement extend over one mile, with small flags marking the center point of

© Shalaco Sching
© Shalaco Sching
© Shalaco Sching
© Shalaco Sching
© Shalaco Sching
© Shalaco Sching
© Shalaco Sching
© Shalaco Sching
© Shalaco Sching
© Shalaco Sching
Continue reading "How is Burning Man Built?"

Snarkitecture’s BOUNCE Offers A Surreal Playground to Hong Kong’s Waterfront

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BOUNCE. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture BOUNCE. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture New York-based collaborative and design studio Snarkitecture have unveiled their newest interactive installation, bringing a surreal sense of play to Hong Kong’s waterfront. Titled “BOUNCE,” the installation features hundreds of 300% sized bouncing balls contained in a cage-like stadium, inviting the public to “create their own unique playing experiences.” The program is spread across three locations, with the feature installation along the Harbour City waterfront, an indoor installation at the Ocean Center titled “Gallery by the Harbour,” and a children’s “Eyeball Maze” at the Ocean Terminal.
BOUNCE. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture BOUNCE. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture
BOUNCE. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture BOUNCE. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture

BOUNCE is Snarkitecture’s first installation in Hong Kong, embodying the studio’s focus on the “boundaries between art and architecture.” The main installation along the Hong Kong waterfront invites visitors to “roll, lift, and toss hundreds of enlarged 300%, 1-meter diameter white bouncy balls in an outdoor

BOUNCE. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture
BOUNCE. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture
Gallery by the Harbour. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture
Gallery by the Harbour. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture
Eyeball Maze. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture
Eyeball Maze. Image Courtesy of Snarkitecture
Continue reading "Snarkitecture’s BOUNCE Offers A Surreal Playground to Hong Kong’s Waterfront"

Sacred Architecture Models Crafted from Hand-Cut Paper by Michael Velliquette

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via Michael Velliquette via Michael Velliquette American artist Michael Velliquette has produced his latest series of paper-based artwork, creating intricate paper models of sacred architecture. His hand-cut paper shapes are assembled into complex forms  “akin to sacred architecture and three-dimensional mandalas.” Prioritizing formal symmetry, balance, and order, the models aim to evoke “a sense of visual equanimity” through a restrained palette of neutral or monochromatic tones.
via Michael Velliquette via Michael Velliquette
via Michael Velliquette via Michael Velliquette

Velliquette’s website documents his latest series among other noted works, including his New York City public commission “Sparkle Vision City” in 2015, and several other paper-based works including "Paper Serpents" and "Paper Flowers."

via Michael Velliquette via Michael Velliquette
via Michael Velliquette via Michael Velliquette

Paper has been widely exploited as an architectural medium of late, from Instagram accounts using paper to create surreal architectural scenes, to paper models dedicated to Soviet buildings and Polish Modernism

via Michael Velliquette via Michael Velliquette
via Michael Velliquette via Michael Velliquette
via Michael Velliquette via
via Michael Velliquette
via Michael Velliquette
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Could Carrots Make Concrete Stronger and Greener?

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via flickr user conchur licenced under CC BY 2.0 via flickr user conchur licenced under CC BY 2.0 Carrots cannot help you see in the dark, but they could make your buildings stronger, and more environmentally friendly. Engineers at Lancaster University in the UK have worked in collaboration with Cellucomp Ltd UK to study the effects of adding “nano platelets” extracted from the fibers of root vegetables to enhance the performance of concrete mixtures. The vegetable-composite concretes, made from vegetables such as sugar beet or carrot, have structurally and environmentally out-performed all commercially-available cement additives, such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, doing so at a much lower cost. 

The potential of the vegetable-composite concretes lies in the ability of the nano platelets to increase the amount of calcium silicate hydrate in concrete mixtures, which is the main substance controlling structural performance. The knock-on effect means smaller quantities of concrete would be needed for construction. In addition, the

via flickr user rocketboom licenced under CC BY 2.0
via flickr user 29487672@N07 licenced under CC BY 2.0
Continue reading "Could Carrots Make Concrete Stronger and Greener?"

Could Carrots Make Concrete Stronger and Greener?

    <figure>
via flickr user conchur licenced under CC BY 2.0 via flickr user conchur licenced under CC BY 2.0 Carrots cannot help you see in the dark, but they could make your buildings stronger, and more environmentally friendly. Engineers at Lancaster University in the UK have worked in collaboration with Cellucomp Ltd UK to study the effects of adding “nano platelets” extracted from the fibers of root vegetables to enhance the performance of concrete mixtures. The vegetable-composite concretes, made from vegetables such as sugar beet or carrot, have structurally and environmentally out-performed all commercially-available cement additives, such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, doing so at a much lower cost. 

The potential of the vegetable-composite concretes lies in the ability of the nano platelets to increase the amount of calcium silicate hydrate in concrete mixtures, which is the main substance controlling structural performance. The knock-on effect means smaller quantities of concrete would be needed for construction. In addition, the

via flickr user rocketboom licenced under CC BY 2.0
via flickr user 29487672@N07 licenced under CC BY 2.0
Continue reading "Could Carrots Make Concrete Stronger and Greener?"

An Inflatable Antepavilion Theater is Setting Sail Through London’s Canals

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The 2018 Antepavilion has opened in London, the second in an annual series. Designed and built by Thomas Randall-Page and Benedetta Rogers, the 2018 edition titled “AirDraft” sees an inflatable theater sitting atop a 19th-century barge, creating a floating venue for music and performance in trendy East London. The scheme was chosen from 132 entries to the competition run by Shiva Ltd and the Architecture Foundation, which asked participants to engage with “the heritage of the Regent’s Canal in innovative ways.”
© Jim Stephenson © Jim Stephenson
© Jim Stephenson © Jim Stephenson

The inflatable Zeppelin-inspired structure allows the theater to navigate London’s network of canal bridges and tunnels, as it travels around the capital for a ten-day festival visiting pubs and art venues. From 11th to 17th August, the structure will stop at sites including Granary Square in Kings Cross, The Constitution in Camden, The Rosemary Branch in Islington and Grow in

© Jim Stephenson
© Jim Stephenson
© Jim Stephenson
© Jim Stephenson
© Jim Stephenson
© Jim Stephenson
Continue reading "An Inflatable Antepavilion Theater is Setting Sail Through London’s Canals"

RIBA Elects New President following Controversial Campaign

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RIBA Headquarters at Portland Place, London. Image © wikmedia commons user Cmglee RIBA Headquarters at Portland Place, London. Image © wikmedia commons user Cmglee Members of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) have elected Alan Jones to be their next president, following a turbulent campaign marked by allegations of institutional racism, financial disparity, and fraud. Jones saw off competition from fellow candidates Elsie Owusu and Philip David Allsopp. Jones, who is a Past President of the Royal Society of Ulster Architects, and the first RIBA president from Northern Ireland, will take over from current RIBA president Ben Derbyshire for a two-year term beginning on September 1st, 2019.
Alan Jones. Image via The Guardian Alan Jones. Image via The Guardian

Turnout for the election was 19%, with Jones receiving 2,704 votes, and his rivals Owusu and Allsopp receiving 1,673 and 857 votes respectively. The vote was open to registered members of the RIBA, though student members could not vote. Jones is currently the RIBA Vice-President for

Elsie Owusu. Image via The Guardian
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BIG’s First Twisting Tower Tops Out in Manhattan as New Renderings Released

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Courtesy of Andrew Campbell Nelson Courtesy of Andrew Campbell Nelson Bjarke Ingels Group’s “The Eleventh” has marked a major milestone, with the first of the scheme’s two twisting High Line towers topping out in Chelsea, Manhattan. New images show construction moving quickly along, with the taller 35-story tower now topped out, and work on the cladding steadily progressing. The 400-foot-tall structure will twist alongside a second 300-foot-tall sister tower, standing out even amongst notable neighbors including Frank Gehry’s IAC BuildingJean Nouvel’s 100 11th Avenue and Foster + Partners’ 551 West 21st Street.
Courtesy of Andrew Campbell Nelson Courtesy of Andrew Campbell Nelson
Courtesy of Andrew Campbell Nelson Courtesy of Andrew Campbell Nelson

Comprised of a podium and two twisting bronze and travertine-clad towers, connected by a skybridge, The Eleventh will span the entire block between 17th and 18th streets and 10th and 11th avenues. The towers will house a total of 236 residences as well as the “Six Senses New York”

Courtesy of Andrew Campbell Nelson
Courtesy of Andrew Campbell Nelson
Courtesy of Andrew Campbell Nelson
Courtesy of Andrew Campbell Nelson
Courtesy of TheXI.com
Courtesy of TheXI.com
Continue reading "BIG’s First Twisting Tower Tops Out in Manhattan as New Renderings Released"

10 ArchDaily Projects That You Can Book Through Airbnb

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La Muralla Roja / Ricardo Bofill. Image © Gregori Civera La Muralla Roja / Ricardo Bofill. Image © Gregori Civera ArchDaily and Airbnb were both founded in 2008, but for two very different reasons. Since then, ArchDaily has amassed a vast database of tens of thousands of buildings, located in cities and countries all around the world. Meanwhile, Airbnb has revolutionized the way in which we explore these countries, and use these buildings, even if just for one night.  While architecture lovers have occasionally been offered very limited experiences through Airbnb, such as a one-night stay on the Great Wall of China, or an architectural tour of the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Stadium courtesy of Kengo Kuma, it transpires that Airbnb’s listings contain some notable architectural gems available for regular booking. Located in diverse settings from Iceland to Peru, and designed by famous architects past and present, we have unpacked ten projects previously featured by ArchDaily,
La Muralla Roja / Ricardo Bofill. Image © Andres Gallardo
Villa Vista / Shigeru Ban Architects. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai
Kubuswoningen / Piet Blom. Image © Dirk Verwoerd
Eppstein House / Frank Lloyd Wright. Image © The Eppstein House
Off-grid itHouse / Taalman Koch. Image © Art Gray
Ex of In House / Steven Holl Architects. Image © Paul Warchol
Säynätsalo Town Hall / Alvar Aalto. Image © Fernanda Castro
TDA House / Cadaval & Solà-Morales
VillaLóla / ARKÍS architects. Image © ARKÍS architects
Sky Pods / Natura Vive. Image © Airbnb
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Drone Footage Shows Zaha Hadid’s One Thousand Museum Tower Nearing Completion

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New drone footage and photographs have been released of the One Thousand Museum, designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, as work progresses in Miami, Florida. Having topped out in February 2018, the 62-story residential tower is due for completion later in the year. The new imagery showcases the 700-foot-high (210-meter-high) tower’s curved structural exoskeleton, comprising 5,000 pieces of glass-fiber-reinforced concrete. The photo gallery also offers some of the first images of the scheme’s interior spaces, still under construction, showing the influence of the exoskeleton on the internal environment.

The One Thousand Museum was Zaha Hadid’s first residential tower in the Western Hemisphere, and one the final projects designed by Hadid in her lifetime. When completed, the scheme will contain a range of residential options, including half-floor and full-floor residences, duplex townhomes, and a single duplex penthouse. The tower is the first building in the United States to utilize

Courtesy of One Thousand Museum
Courtesy of One Thousand Museum
Courtesy of One Thousand Museum
Courtesy of One Thousand Museum
Courtesy of One Thousand Museum
Courtesy of One Thousand Museum
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Asbestos is Returning to U.S. Manufacturing due to EPA Regulation Reform

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Courtesy of flickr user Stefano Mortellaro Courtesy of flickr user Stefano Mortellaro The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has enabled the reintroduction of asbestos into the American manufacturing, as reported by Fast Company. The dangerous substance, outlawed in 65 countries, may now be introduced into the U.S via common household products and materials. The development is the result of a “SNUR” (Significant New Use Rule) which allows asbestos-containing products to be petitioned and approved by the federal government on an individual basis. The loophole has manifested due to a relaxation by the EPA in how it evaluates the risk of potentially harmful chemical products. Under the EPA’s framework, risk evaluations will no longer consider the effect or presence of substances in the air, ground, or water, offering a loophole to those seeking to reinstate asbestos-derived products. While asbestos does not pose a direct threat to consumers, the danger of interacting with harmful asbestos fibers becomes
Continue reading "Asbestos is Returning to U.S. Manufacturing due to EPA Regulation Reform"

Carlo Ratti Associati’s Proposed Milan Science Campus Features Robotically-Assembled Brick Facades

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Courtesy of Carlo Ratti Associati Courtesy of Carlo Ratti Associati Carlo Ratti Associati has released details of their schematic design for the University of Milan’s new science campus, featuring robotically-assembled brick facades, porous communal areas, and natural oases. Working in collaboration with Australian real estate group Lendlease, the “Science for Citizens” proposal will sit within a new Milan Innovation District, located on the site of Milan’s 2015 World Expo. Located within this new district, and home to over 18,000 students and 2,000 researchers, the “Science for Citizens” proposal seeks to “put forward a vision for an open campus that becomes a testing ground for innovative education while fostering exchanges between the university and the surrounding innovation neighborhood.”
Courtesy of Carlo Ratti Associati Courtesy of Carlo Ratti Associati
The 1.6 million-square-foot (150,000-square-meter) scheme draws inspiration from the Ca’ Granda building, the historic headquarters of the University of Milan. Like its predecessor, the new campus will be organized around
Continue reading "Carlo Ratti Associati’s Proposed Milan Science Campus Features Robotically-Assembled Brick Facades"

Steven Holl Architects Chosen to Design University College Dublin Future Campus

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Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects Steven Holl Architects have been announced as winners of the University College Dublin Future Campus Competition, overcoming 98 total entries, and a shortlist of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, John Ronan Architects, O’Donnell + Tuomey, Studio Libeskind, and UNStudio. The winning design features seven new quadrangles designed around historic features and woodland, integrating sustainable features such as solar connectors and water retention ponds. The competition sought to express UCD’s creative abilities and strengthen its physical presence and identity, signifying a major educational project for the Irish capital. 
Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects
Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

Holl’s 24-hectare scheme focuses on the creation of an exhilarating Centre for Creative Design, serving as a gateway for seven new quadrangles of green space. A new pedestrian spine runs parallel to an existing path, creating a H-plan lined with weather canopies. Social

Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects
Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects
Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects
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MAD Revitalizes Abandoned Japanese Mountain Tunnel with Elemental Art Trail

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Light Cave (Water). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc Light Cave (Water). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc MAD Architects have completed their restoration work on the Kiyotsu Gorge Tunnel in Japan’s Niigata prefecture, transforming the historic lookout tunnel into a trail of artistic spaces. The “Tunnel of Light” was opened as part of the 2018 Echigo-Tsumari Triennale, cutting through 750 meters of rock formations to offer a panoramic view across one of Japan’s great landscapes. MAD’s scheme seeks to “transform points along the historic tunnel through the realization of several architectural spaces and artistic atmospheres." Inspired by the five elements of wood, earth, metal, fire, and water, the scheme explores the relationship between humans and nature, and "re-connects locals and visitors alike with the majestic beauty of the land."

Periscope (Wood)

Periscope (Wood). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc Periscope (Wood). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc
Periscope (Wood). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc Periscope (Wood). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc

Approaching the tunnel, a small wooden hut

Expression of Color (Earth). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc
Expression of Color (Earth). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc
Invisible Bubble (Metal). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc
The Drop (Fire). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc
The Drop (Fire). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc
Light Cave (Water). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc
Light Cave (Water). Image Courtesy of Nacasa & Partners Inc
Continue reading "MAD Revitalizes Abandoned Japanese Mountain Tunnel with Elemental Art Trail"

Zaha Hadid Architects’ Mercury Tower adds a “Sense of Dynamism” to Malta’s East Coast

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West elevation render. Image Courtesy of VA West elevation render. Image Courtesy of VA Zaha Hadid Architects have released images of their proposed redevelopment of the historic Mercury House, situated in the tourism and entertainment center of Paceville on Malta’s east coast. An extensive renovation to the existing structure will see the integration of residential apartments, a boutique hotel, and a range of public spaces and amenities. The boldest addition to the derelict heritage site will be a 31-story tower, rotating as it rises in response to different functional programs. The resulting form seeks to instill “a sense of dynamism within its silhouette that changes when viewed from different directions around Paceville."
West elevation render. Image Courtesy of VA West elevation render. Image Courtesy of VA
East elevation render. Image Courtesy of VA East elevation render. Image Courtesy of VA

Built in 1903, Mercury House sits on a 100,000-square-foot (9,500-square-meter) site which also hosts two Cold-War-era underground vaults. Designed in collaboration with local architect Annamaria Attard Montalto, the restoration

Night render. Image Courtesy of VA
Swimming pool render. Image Courtesy of ZHA
Piazza render. Image Courtesy of VA
Pavilion render. Image Courtesy of VA
Continue reading "Zaha Hadid Architects’ Mercury Tower adds a “Sense of Dynamism” to Malta’s East Coast"

Comparing Tree Coverage in 10 Major Cities Around the World

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New York. Image via flickr user "quintanomedia"licensed under CC BY 2.0 New York. Image via flickr user "quintanomedia"licensed under CC BY 2.0 Throughout the last two years, researchers at the MIT Senseable City Lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts have been using Google Street View data to study some of the world’s most prominent cities in terms of tree coverage. Developed in collaboration with the World Economic Forum, “Treepedia” seeks to promote awareness of the role of green canopies in urban life, and asks how citizens can be more integral to the process of greening their neighborhoods.  The ever-growing list studies cities both around and beyond the USA, using an innovative metric called the “Green View Index,” which uses Google Street View panoramas to evaluate and compare green canopy coverage in major cities. Through monitoring the urban tree coverage, citizens and planners can see which areas in their city are green and not green, compare their green canopy with other
Boston. Image via flickr user "boblinsdell"licensed under CC BY 2.0
Cape Town. Image via flickr user "wenzday01"licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
London. Image via flickr user "The man behind the mirror"licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0
Los Angeles. Image via flickr user "lulek"licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0
Montreal. Image via flickr user "husseinabdallah"licensed under CC BY 2.0
New York. Image via flickr user "Wolfgang Bücker" licensed under CC BY 2.0
Paris. Image via pixabay user "teleistapix" licensed under CC BY 2.0
Oslo. Image via flickr user "dconvertini" licensed under CC BY 2.0
Sao Paolo. Image via pixabay user "joelfotos" licensed under CC BY 2.0
Tel Aviv. Image via flickr user "Tim Rochte" licensed under CC BY 2.0
Continue reading "Comparing Tree Coverage in 10 Major Cities Around the World"

Comparing Tree Coverage in 10 Major Cities Around the World

    <figure>
New York. Image via flickr user "quintanomedia"licensed under CC BY 2.0 New York. Image via flickr user "quintanomedia"licensed under CC BY 2.0 Throughout the last two years, researchers at the MIT Senseable City Lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts have been using Google Street View data to study some of the world’s most prominent cities in terms of tree coverage. Developed in collaboration with the World Economic Forum, “Treepedia” seeks to promote awareness of the role of green canopies in urban life, and asks how citizens can be more integral to the process of greening their neighborhoods.  The ever-growing list studies cities both around and beyond the USA, using an innovative metric called the “Green View Index,” which uses Google Street View panoramas to evaluate and compare green canopy coverage in major cities. Through monitoring the urban tree coverage, citizens and planners can see which areas in their city are green and not green, compare their green canopy with other
Boston. Image via flickr user "boblinsdell"licensed under CC BY 2.0
Cape Town. Image via flickr user "wenzday01"licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
London. Image via flickr user "The man behind the mirror"licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0
Los Angeles. Image via flickr user "lulek"licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0
Montreal. Image via flickr user "husseinabdallah"licensed under CC BY 2.0
New York. Image via flickr user "Wolfgang Bücker" licensed under CC BY 2.0
Paris. Image via pixabay user "teleistapix" licensed under CC BY 2.0
Oslo. Image via flickr user "dconvertini" licensed under CC BY 2.0
Sao Paolo. Image via pixabay user "joelfotos" licensed under CC BY 2.0
Tel Aviv. Image via flickr user "Tim Rochte" licensed under CC BY 2.0
Continue reading "Comparing Tree Coverage in 10 Major Cities Around the World"