Invisible Doors: How to Stylishly Hide the Doors In Your Projects

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Linvisibile Alba Infinito Hinged Door, Microcement Finish. Image Courtesy of Linvisibile Linvisibile Alba Infinito Hinged Door, Microcement Finish. Image Courtesy of Linvisibile

Sometimes a door can be a huge headache in a project. Think of a continuous, clean facade... having a door in the middle of it can ruin the clarity of the design. But a door need not be the traditional wood-paneled, brass-knobbed portal most of us are used to, much less an eyesore. 

But what if they could disappear from sight entirely? We’ve all dreamed of hidden passages and secret rooms tucked away in our homes. But for these to work, the entry must be disguised or hidden itself. 

The Italian company Linvisibile makes these dreams possible, producing a patented high-end invisible flush to wall doors. Not only to provide a secret getaway but to also fit in the elegant, mystic, and private atmosphere of interiors in a functional space-saving way.

Even a small detail can create a
Linvisibile Orizzonte_Marble Boiserie applied on the Brezza Filo 10 Vertical Pivot door. Image Courtesy of Linvisibile
Linvisibile Technical Closures - Extra Closure - stone finish. Image Courtesy of Linvisibile
Linvisibile - Alba Curved Hinged door - as wall finish. Image Courtesy of Linvisibile
Linvisibile - Technical Closures - Nicchio - wallpaper finish. Image Courtesy of Linvisibile
Linvisibile - Technical Closures - Extra Closures - Multiple Leaves Lacquered. Image Courtesy of Linvisibile
Linvisibile - Brezza Filo 10 Vertical Pivot Door_Alcantara® Finish. Image Courtesy of Linvisibile
Continue reading "Invisible Doors: How to Stylishly Hide the Doors In Your Projects"

This Sound-Proof Installation was Built Using Compressed Concrete and Bubble Wrap

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© Per Lundström © Per Lundström
© Per Lundström © Per Lundström
An installation at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden is made entirely of translucent concrete panels. Composed of concrete and bubble wrap, the site blends both high and low technology processes. This high-tech lecture hall is an amorphous space with unique acoustic qualities.  The panels were created by compressing High-Performance Concrete between two layers of Bubble-Wrap. With 262,500 cavities and 1,000,000 membrane-perforations, the material creates a diffused echo-free ambiance. The million micro-perforations absorbs noise while the cavities diffuse high-pitch sounds. The shape of the structure also diffuses sounds in a lower register. The result is a totally unique noise-free environment. The structure's irregular bubble-like surface contrasts with the sterile lab environment that dominates the rest of the building. Brown terrazzo was chosen to simulate a mud-floor while the bubbles create an alienesque aesthetic. Together with the light refraction in the micro-layered glass railings, an almost surreal Alice in Wonderland atmosphere is created. 
© Per Lundström © Per Lundström

The casting

Digital Method / Grasshopper. Image © Per Lundström
© Per Lundström
Continue reading "This Sound-Proof Installation was Built Using Compressed Concrete and Bubble Wrap"

This Sound-Proof Installation was Built Using Compressed Concrete and Bubble Wrap

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© Per Lundström © Per Lundström
© Per Lundström © Per Lundström
An installation at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden is made entirely of translucent concrete panels. Composed of concrete and bubble wrap, the site blends both high and low technology processes. This high-tech lecture hall is an amorphous space with unique acoustic qualities.  The panels were created by compressing High-Performance Concrete between two layers of Bubble-Wrap. With 262,500 cavities and 1,000,000 membrane-perforations, the material creates a diffused echo-free ambiance. The million micro-perforations absorbs noise while the cavities diffuse high-pitch sounds. The shape of the structure also diffuses sounds in a lower register. The result is a totally unique noise-free environment. The structure's irregular bubble-like surface contrasts with the sterile lab environment that dominates the rest of the building. Brown terrazzo was chosen to simulate a mud-floor while the bubbles create an alienesque aesthetic. Together with the light refraction in the micro-layered glass railings, an almost surreal Alice in Wonderland atmosphere is created. 
© Per Lundström © Per Lundström

The casting

Digital Method / Grasshopper. Image © Per Lundström
© Per Lundström
Continue reading "This Sound-Proof Installation was Built Using Compressed Concrete and Bubble Wrap"

The Versatility of Gabion Walls, From Infrastructure to Urban Furniture

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Bosque Altozano Club House / Parque Humano. Image Cortesia de Parque Humano Bosque Altozano Club House / Parque Humano. Image Cortesia de Parque Humano Widely used in infrastructure, gabion walls are structures made of mesh metal cages filled with stones. These permeable walls use galvanized steel wire to withstand outdoor conditions. 
REX House / FGMF Arquitetos. Image © Rafaela Netto REX House / FGMF Arquitetos. Image © Rafaela Netto

They are flexible retaining walls that stabilize slopes and seek to improve the firmness between masses of earth and rock, avoiding phenomena such as landslides. 

Restauración Paisajística del Vertedero de Residuos de la Vall d'en Joan / Batlle i Roig Arquitectes. Image © Jordi Surroca Restauración Paisajística del Vertedero de Residuos de la Vall d'en Joan / Batlle i Roig Arquitectes. Image © Jordi Surroca

The pieces are stacked one by one creating a unit, or wall; each cage is attached to the other by a wire or small steel handle. In general, there are three types of gabion indicated for works with specific characteristics: box, mattress, and bag. Each varies in shape and measurement, but are made up of similar materials.

Eduardo Souza Eduardo Souza

In recent

Canine Brigade / TRANSFORM + DS architecture. Image © Julien Lanoo
Archeopark Pavlov / Architektonicka Kancelar . Image © Gabriel Dvořák
Clifton House / Malan Vorster Architecture Interior Design. Image © Adam Letch
REX House / FGMF Arquitetos. Image © Rafaela Netto
BAH Restaurante Parkshopping / Tellini Vontobel Arquitetura. Image © Cristiano Bauce
Hermana República / Muñoz Arquitectos. Image © Marcos Mendizabal
Restauración Paisajística del Vertedero de Residuos de la Vall d'en Joan / Batlle i Roig Arquitectes. Image © Jordi Surroca
Metropolitan Park South Access / Polidura Talhouk Arquitectos. Image © Marcos Mendizabal
Continue reading "The Versatility of Gabion Walls, From Infrastructure to Urban Furniture"

Francis Kéré: “I Draw on Paper, but I Prefer to Draw on the Ground”

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© Eduardo Souza © Eduardo Souza This phrase caught my eye during Diébédo Francis Kéré's speech at the AAICO (Architecture and Art International Congress), which took place in Porto, Portugal from September 3 to 8. After being introduced by none other than Eduardo Souto de Moura, Kéré began his speech with the simplicity and humility that guides his work. His best-known works were built in remote places, where materials are scarce and the workforce is of the residents themselves, using local resources and techniques.
Moradia para os professores de Gando. Image © Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk Moradia para os professores de Gando. Image © Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

Instead of imposing structures and a new way of living for users, Kéré seeks to understand the real demands of the place, the traditions of the residents, their way of living, contributing the technical knowledge acquired abroad to create new functional spaces. Not that this process is always easy. In the design phase, before he reaches

Anexo da Escola Primária de Gando / Kéré Architecture. Image © Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk
Cortesia de Kéré Architecture
Cortesia de Kéré Architecture
Anexo da Escola Primária de Gando / Kéré Architecture. Image © Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk
Continue reading "Francis Kéré: “I Draw on Paper, but I Prefer to Draw on the Ground”"

Francis Kéré: “I Draw on Paper, but I Prefer to Draw on the Ground”

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© Eduardo Souza © Eduardo Souza This phrase caught my eye during Diébédo Francis Kéré's speech at the AAICO (Architecture and Art International Congress), which took place in Porto, Portugal from September 3 to 8. After being introduced by none other than Eduardo Souto de Moura, Kéré began his speech with the simplicity and humility that guides his work. His best-known works were built in remote places, where materials are scarce and the workforce is of the residents themselves, using local resources and techniques.
Moradia para os professores de Gando. Image © Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk Moradia para os professores de Gando. Image © Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

Instead of imposing structures and a new way of living for users, Kéré seeks to understand the real demands of the place, the traditions of the residents, their way of living, contributing the technical knowledge acquired abroad to create new functional spaces. Not that this process is always easy. In the design phase, before he reaches

Anexo da Escola Primária de Gando / Kéré Architecture. Image © Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk
Cortesia de Kéré Architecture
Cortesia de Kéré Architecture
Anexo da Escola Primária de Gando / Kéré Architecture. Image © Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk
Continue reading "Francis Kéré: “I Draw on Paper, but I Prefer to Draw on the Ground”"

What Affects the Quality of Life in Urban Environments?

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© Yves Bachmann © Yves Bachmann

As I left the streets of Zurich after attending a conference about the quality of life in urban environments, I came across a living example of the lecture I had just attended. I turned the corner and felt that I was inside an architectural rendering: the trees were pruned and green, there were no hanging electrical wires, cyclists drove elegantly along bike lanes, the tram moved quietly and punctually while bathers enjoyed their summer in rivers and lakes. To my surprise, I walked under an overpass and realized that even urban cities could be skilled and safe. After my stroll, I stopped for a cup of coffee and knew that the person that attended me received a fair salary and did not have to work three jobs to pay the bills (of course the coffee did not come cheap). However, these small, almost mundane observations for some, do provide a well-being and

© Yves Bachmann
© Yves Bachmann
© Yves Bachmann
Continue reading "What Affects the Quality of Life in Urban Environments?"

How to Calculate Spiral Staircase Dimensions and Designs

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© Matheus Pereira © Matheus Pereira

Spiral staircases save valuable square meters because they occupy a much smaller area than a conventional staircase. With daring shapes and diverse configurations, they can also be iconic objects in projects. However, the design of these staircases requires careful attention so that you can prevent an uncomfortable or dangerous outcome. Although BIM software simplifies this process, it's always important to understand the restrictions and the underlying concepts.

Spiral staircases can adopt different structural configurations. The most common ones have a circular format with a central mast from which the steps are fixed.

© Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon

For this design, three main factors must be taken into account:

  • How high must the staircase rise vertically? (Distance between floors)
  • What is its angle of rotation?
  • What is its diameter?

It's important to be clear about where the staircase will begin and where it will end at the upper level, according to the flows that have been

© Matheus Pereira
© Matheus Pereira
© Matheus Pereira
© Mark Cocksedge
© Agnese Sanvito
Continue reading "How to Calculate Spiral Staircase Dimensions and Designs"

Kengo Kuma and OODA Win Competition to Redevelop Porto Slaughterhouse

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Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates + OODA Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates + OODA

Kengo Kuma and Associates, in collaboration with OODA, have won a competition for the redevelopment of an old industrial slaughterhouse in Porto. The competition was launched in 2017 to transform the building, now abandoned for 20 years, into an anchor for social interaction, while maintaining the memory of the early 20th-century building. 

The scheme seeks to reconnect the previously important structure with the city center, through interventions such as a bridge linking the site with a nearby metro station. Meanwhile, a vernacular roof stretching across the entire site unites old and new, under which sits a museum, library, performance space, art archive, and creative laboratory. 

Project description from the architects:

For the new Matadouro (Slaughterhouse) project we are interested in creating a building rooted in local history and memory and to develop a sensory translation of the public space that
Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates + OODA
Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates + OODA
Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates + OODA
Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates + OODA
Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates + OODA
Continue reading "Kengo Kuma and OODA Win Competition to Redevelop Porto Slaughterhouse"

Cross Laminated Timber (CLT): What It Is and How To Use It

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The Smile / Alison Brooks Architects. Image © Alison Brooks The Smile / Alison Brooks Architects. Image © Alison Brooks A few weeks ago we published an article on a recent sustainability crisis that often goes unnoticed. The construction industry has been consuming an exorbitant amount of sand, and it's gradually depleting. When used for manufacturing concrete, glass, and other materials, it is a matter that should concern us. Construction is one of the largest producers of solid waste in the world. For instance, Brazil represents about 50% to 70% of the total solid waste produced. But how can we change this situation if most of the materials we use are not renewable, and therefore, finite? Popularized in Europe and gradually gaining attention in the rest of the world, Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) stands out for its strength, appearance, versatility, and sustainability. The material consists of planks (or lamellas) of sawn, glued, and layered wood, where each layer is oriented
Cross-Laminated-Timber Cottage / Kariouk Associates. Image © Photolux Studio (Christian Lalonde)
Cross-Laminated-Timber Cottage / Kariouk Associates. Image © Photolux Studio (Christian Lalonde)
Skilpod #150 Zero Energy / Skilpod + UAU Collectiv. Image © Geert Van Hertum
Kiterasu / ofa. Image © Ken'ichi Suzuki
MINIMOD Catuçaba / MAPA. Image © Leonardo Finotti
Skilpod #150 Zero Energy / Skilpod + UAU Collectiv. Image © Geert Van Hertum
MINIMOD Catuçaba / MAPA. Image © Leonardo Finotti
Kiterasu / ofa. Image © Ken'ichi Suzuki
Cross-Laminated-Timber Cottage / Kariouk Associates. Image © Photolux Studio (Christian Lalonde)
CLTHouse / atelierjones. Image © Lara Swimmer Photography
Maria & José House / Sergio Sampaio Arquitetura. Image © Leonardo Finotti
The Smile / Alison Brooks Architects. Image © Guy Bell
Continue reading "Cross Laminated Timber (CLT): What It Is and How To Use It"

Most Architects Prefer Working in Organized Spaces, But Some Opt for “Organized Chaos”

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© Matheus Pereira © Matheus Pereira When we say "most" architects, we're basing our conclusion on the responses to our first AD Discussion of 2018. Even though Tim Harford, author of the book Messy, contends that disorder and a bit of confusion can be linked to spaces that inspire more creativity, our readers tend to disagree. In our review of comments on our article, the majority of respondents explained that workspaces with out-of-place objects negatively affected their ability to concentrate. Many responses alluded to their more efficient and prolific results gained by working in an organized space. But that doesn't mean that all ArchDaily readers agreed; there are still ardent defenders of "control chaos" who insist that their best work emerges from working beneath piles of papers or supplies.  Perhaps this debate seems irrelevant; "what's the point?" you may ask. But if we consider the number of architects who are designing
Continue reading "Most Architects Prefer Working in Organized Spaces, But Some Opt for “Organized Chaos”"

Aldo’s Kitchen / IBUKU

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Courtesy of IBUKU Courtesy of IBUKU
  • Architects: IBUKU
  • Location: Sibang Kaja, Abiansemal, Badung Regency, Bali, Indonesia
  • Client: Green School
  • Site Area: 45000
  • Area: 500.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2007
Courtesy of IBUKU Courtesy of IBUKU

Text description provided by the architects. Aldo's Kitchen was one of the first bamboo buildings in the area, imagined by Aldo Landwher, a former sculptor and jewelry designer who conceived the original buildings of the Green School, for John Hardy. The building also strongly inspired the design of the Heart of School at Green Schoo Bali, where the form was repeated 3 times, maintaining proportions and similar ideas.

Courtesy of IBUKU Courtesy of IBUKU

It was initially designed to be a restaurant, but it is currently the headquarters of the IBUKU office, highlighting the versatility and longevity of the bamboo structure. Defit Wijaya, senior architect of IBUKU, explains that the design was based on the shape of a snail, spiraled and without orthogonal

Courtesy of IBUKU
Model. Image Courtesy of IBUKU
Courtesy of IBUKU
Continue reading "Aldo’s Kitchen / IBUKU"

Architecture Documentaries to Watch in 2018

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The new year is here! And with it, a new slate of documentaries we're dying to see.

Of all the media forms, film seems to be the most adept at making a personal connection with viewers, offering a behind-the-scenes look into the lives of a great architect, the construction, and performance of a project or an issue that is confronting the entire architecture community. This year's films are no exception, as we get the chance to learn about the daily routines of Bjarke Ingels and Paulo Mendes da Rocha, projects by Tadao Ando and Glenn Murcutt, and the troubles of urbanization and gentrification.

Check out this year's list below, and find more great architecture documentaries with our Architecture Documentaries to Watch in 2017Architecture Documentaries to Watch in 2015, our top 40 Architecture Docs to Watch in 2014, and our 30 Architecture Docs to Watch in 2013.

BIG TIME
© atelier XYZ
Continue reading "Architecture Documentaries to Watch in 2018"

If We Were To Design The Ideal Building Material, It Would Look A Lot Like Bamboo

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© Eduardo Souza © Eduardo Souza "Bamboo is too close to an ideal structural material." This statement by Neil Thomas during his talk at Bamboo U, which took place in November 2017 in Bali, really caught my attention. Neil is the director of atelier one, a London office of structural engineering, whose outstanding projects include stage and scenography for the Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, and U2; art installations by Anish Kapoor and Marc Quinn; the Gardens by the Bay, in Singapore, among many others. From a few years to now, the engineer has exhaustive study about bamboo, its structural properties and its most diverse potentialities.  According to him, bamboo is too close to the ideal structural material, beginning with its tubular shape, an open section, such as a channel, is weaker than a closed one because the edge can bend much more easily. Just think of a sheet of paper and how it becomes stronger
© José Tomás Franco
© José Tomás Franco
Green School. Image © Eduardo Souza
© Eduardo Souza
© José Tomás Franco
Continue reading "If We Were To Design The Ideal Building Material, It Would Look A Lot Like Bamboo"

World Urbanism Day: A Selection of Texts About Cities and Urban Planning

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Reprodução do manifesto original do símbolo do urbanismo. . Image via Della Paolera, C. M. (1934). El símbolo del urbanismo. Buenos Aires: Dirección del Plan de Urbanización, Municipalidad de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires Reprodução do manifesto original do símbolo do urbanismo. . Image via Della Paolera, C. M. (1934). El símbolo del urbanismo. Buenos Aires: Dirección del Plan de Urbanización, Municipalidad de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires Today, November 8, we celebrate World Urbanism Day. Created in 1949 by Carlos Maria della Paolera, a professor at the University of Buenos Aires, the day was meant to increase professional and public interest in planning, both locally and internationally. Paolera is also responsible for designing the symbol of World Urbanism Day, representing the trilogy of natural elements essential to life: the sun (in yellow), vegetation (in green) and air (in blue), referring to the balance between the natural environment and humans. Currently, the event is celebrated in thirty countries on four continents. According to Paolera: "Following the most varied directions in their research, urban planners around the world have come to the conclusion that it is necessary to recover the
Continue reading "World Urbanism Day: A Selection of Texts About Cities and Urban Planning"

Alvaro Siza’s Galician Center of Contemporary Art Through the Lens of Fernando Guerra

    <img src="http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/5966/1399/b22e/38be/df00/0393/original/ezgif.com-gif-maker.gif?1499861908">
The following photo set by Fernando Guerra focuses on the Galician Center of Contemporary Art, a project by Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza Vieira.  Located in the Spanish city of Santiago de Compostela, the Galician Center for Contemporary Art was developed in 1993. Its declared horizontality and respect for the surrounding buildings and the urban structure are configured in the most remarkable gestures of this project. The solid and austere volumes form the boundaries of the area to the streets, with subtractions that make it accessible. The center has several permanent and temporary exhibition rooms, auditorium, library, cafeteria and administrative rooms.
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

Granite is used blending to the surroundings, with the material "aging" along with the building, resembling the neighboring buildings, that are also built of the same material. Inside, Siza concentrated on three main materials: granite, marble, and wood, with a

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
Continue reading "Alvaro Siza’s Galician Center of Contemporary Art Through the Lens of Fernando Guerra"

Alvaro Siza’s Galician Center of Contemporary Art Through the Lens of Fernando Guerra

    <img src="http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/5966/1399/b22e/38be/df00/0393/original/ezgif.com-gif-maker.gif?1499861908">
The following photo set by Fernando Guerra focuses on the Galician Center of Contemporary Art, a project by Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza Vieira.  Located in the Spanish city of Santiago de Compostela, the Galician Center for Contemporary Art was developed in 1993. Its declared horizontality and respect for the surrounding buildings and the urban structure are configured in the most remarkable gestures of this project. The solid and austere volumes form the boundaries of the area to the streets, with subtractions that make it accessible. The center has several permanent and temporary exhibition rooms, auditorium, library, cafeteria and administrative rooms.
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

Granite is used blending to the surroundings, with the material "aging" along with the building, resembling the neighboring buildings, that are also built of the same material. Inside, Siza concentrated on three main materials: granite, marble, and wood, with a

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
Continue reading "Alvaro Siza’s Galician Center of Contemporary Art Through the Lens of Fernando Guerra"

Alvaro Siza’s Galician Center of Contemporary Art Through the Lens of Fernando Guerra

    <img src="http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/5966/1399/b22e/38be/df00/0393/original/ezgif.com-gif-maker.gif?1499861908">
The following photo set by Fernando Guerra focuses on the Galician Center of Contemporary Art, a project by Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza Vieira.  Located in the Spanish city of Santiago de Compostela, the Galician Center for Contemporary Art was developed in 1993. Its declared horizontality and respect for the surrounding buildings and the urban structure are configured in the most remarkable gestures of this project. The solid and austere volumes form the boundaries of the area to the streets, with subtractions that make it accessible. The center has several permanent and temporary exhibition rooms, auditorium, library, cafeteria and administrative rooms.
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

Granite is used blending to the surroundings, with the material "aging" along with the building, resembling the neighboring buildings, that are also built of the same material. Inside, Siza concentrated on three main materials: granite, marble, and wood, with a

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
Continue reading "Alvaro Siza’s Galician Center of Contemporary Art Through the Lens of Fernando Guerra"

Alvaro Siza’s Galician Center of Contemporary Art Through the Lens of Fernando Guerra

    <img src="http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/5966/1399/b22e/38be/df00/0393/original/ezgif.com-gif-maker.gif?1499861908">
The following photo set by Fernando Guerra focuses on the Galician Center of Contemporary Art, a project by Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza Vieira.  Located in the Spanish city of Santiago de Compostela, the Galician Center for Contemporary Art was developed in 1993. Its declared horizontality and respect for the surrounding buildings and the urban structure are configured in the most remarkable gestures of this project. The solid and austere volumes form the boundaries of the area to the streets, with subtractions that make it accessible. The center has several permanent and temporary exhibition rooms, auditorium, library, cafeteria and administrative rooms.
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

Granite is used blending to the surroundings, with the material "aging" along with the building, resembling the neighboring buildings, that are also built of the same material. Inside, Siza concentrated on three main materials: granite, marble, and wood, with a

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
Continue reading "Alvaro Siza’s Galician Center of Contemporary Art Through the Lens of Fernando Guerra"

Learn More About Permaculture by Building Your Own Herb Spiral

    <img src="http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/592b/6991/e58e/cee8/3800/0667/original/teste-1.gif?1496017287">
Australian ecologists, David Holmgren and Bill Mollison, first coined the term permaculture in 1978, encompassing holistic methods for planning, updating and maintaining environmentally sustainable, socially just and financially viable systems. For Mollison, "Permaculture is the philosophy of working with and not against nature, after a long and thoughtful observation." In this sense, herbal spirals are an excellent exercise to begin to understand some of the concepts of this culture, as it brings together various natural functions in a single element, making it more productive and healthy. 
© Iana Lua Dias da Cruz © Iana Lua Dias da Cruz

The spiral structure promotes the creation of microclimates in a small space, enabling the cultivation of species with different requirements of water, light, and nutrients. At the top, exposure to the sun is higher, causing the substrate to become drier as it drains to the lower parts. The lower, the moister the earth becomes. In addition,

Continue reading "Learn More About Permaculture by Building Your Own Herb Spiral"