75 Valentines for Architects and (Architecture) Lovers

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Spread the love! These 75 architecture valentines—handmade by ArchDaily readers from around the world—were chosen out of nearly 400 submissions.  The message that we wrote last year is so important that we'll say it again: ArchDaily's mission is to improve the quality of life of the world's inhabitants by publishing content for architects, designers, and decision-makers. We also realize how important tolerance, acceptance, and love are to the process of building a better world. So, from us to you, and from your fellow readers to the world, may you feel a wealth of love on this Valentine's Day. <3

Featured gif by Amy Trick.

© Zoe Brooks © Zoe Brooks
© Lu Cone, Gensler Austin © Lu Cone, Gensler Austin
© Gerardo Gandy, Gensler Austin © Gerardo Gandy, Gensler Austin

Gif by Chara Mantopoulou

© Brittany Newman © Brittany Newman
© Hasna Rozana Rohani © Hasna Rozana Rohani

Gif by Sathish Kumar

© Lauren Carter © Lauren Carter
© Shradha Rane © Shradha Rane
© Pauline Moskal © Pauline Moskal
© Juan Alberto Arjona Belmonte © Juan Alberto Arjona Belmonte

Gif by Hjalmar Bolinder

© shahab shoar ©
© Pauline Moskal
© Shradha Rane
© Chanel Dehond
© Chanel Dehond
© Chanel Dehond
© Chanel Dehond
© Chanel Dehond
© Safia Rahman
© Olivia McLaurin, Gensler Austin
© omid
© Katie Sawey
© Mark Tanner Schreiber May
© Joy Mondal
© Joy Mondal
© Joy Mondal
© Lauren Carter
© Ana Georgieva
© Aleksandra Dineva
© Ana Georgieva
© Gerardo Gandy, Gensler Austin
© Pauline Moskal
© Chelsea Doorne
© Pavithra Ravichandran
© Milad Mogharrabian
© Tim Ng
© Shradha Rane
© Didem AK
© Dwight De Guzman Dela Cruz
© Zoe Brooks
© Hasna Rozana Rohani
© Marco De Donno
© Mary Beth Robbins
© Shan Li
© Rémon Mulder
© Nang Yu Yu Nwe
© Zahra Bagherian
© Marija Lazarevska
© Pavel Kultyshev
© Marion Roux
© Nastarn Razavi
© Abbey Fine
© Besim Krosa
© Shan Li
© Domna Paskaloglou
© Mojtaba Hatami
© Eden Anto
© Jocelyn Winata
© Rosa Lopes
© Marija Lazarevska
© Pavithra Ravichandran
© Kevin Nakover S.
Continue reading "75 Valentines for Architects and (Architecture) Lovers"

3D Printing Fuses Thai Craftsmanship to Create Habitable Concrete Structures

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Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation

Siam Research and Innovation Company (SRI) is a Thailand-based cement manufacturer that has been developing innovations to push the limits of 3D printing in architecture. Their project 'Triple S' –developed in 2017– is based on traditional Thai craftsmanship to generate Surface, Structure, and Shelter in a single process; its specific artisanal form creating beautiful framework for structural purposes, easily building living spaces.

Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation

From the architects. 3D Concrete Printing - Triple "S" is a new evolution in 3D printing consisting of Surface, Structure, and Shelter design concepts. The size is 3.0 x 3.5 x 3.0 meters. Unlike previous developments, the design and 3D printing technology platforms work side-by-side. The advanced research of printing and materials allows the improvement of other dimensions such as structure, engineering, and architecture.

Diagram 3D Printing
Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation
Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation
Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation
Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation
Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation
Continue reading "3D Printing Fuses Thai Craftsmanship to Create Habitable Concrete Structures"

Ateliereen Architecten Create Playful, Permeable Structure Using Metal and Wood

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© Ateliereen Architecten (Eindhoven) © Ateliereen Architecten (Eindhoven) Ateliereen Architecten has proposed a metal and wood configuration for an observation tower in Peize, Netherlands. Their plan is to construct a resistant, permeable and playful structure. The project is designed so that people climbing up the tower will have unique viewpoints. This tower is also easily assembled from screws and bolts. 
© Ateliereen Architecten (Eindhoven) © Ateliereen Architecten (Eindhoven)

From the architects. Nature area De Onlanden is located southwest of the city of Groningen. To enhance the experience of this valuable site, Natuurmonumenten built a viewing tower in this area.

© Ateliereen Architecten (Eindhoven) © Ateliereen Architecten (Eindhoven)

From the tower you have a beautiful view and you can follow the development of the new nature. The tower is a sober landmark in the open countryside; recognizable, but appropriate to the environment.

© Ateliereen Architecten (Eindhoven) © Ateliereen Architecten (Eindhoven)
© Ateliereen Architecten (Eindhoven) © Ateliereen Architecten (Eindhoven)

Instead of focusing on the lookout point, the road to it is designed as

© Ateliereen Architecten (Eindhoven)
Elevations
Details
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Continue reading "Ateliereen Architecten Create Playful, Permeable Structure Using Metal and Wood"

Architects Create Affordable “Exoskeleton” Pavilion With Modular Woods, Tie Straps and Sliding Joints

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Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol "Exoskeleton" is a pavilion that shows how Computer Aided Manufacturing can create rapid prototypes. This manufacturing process allows for real-scale construction and experimentation with limited resources.  In this project, a system of modules, designed with different dimensions, is put together with simple joints without nails or screws. This allows for different surfaces to be formed and for the pieces to be rotated and assembled at various angles and heights.
Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol

From the architects. Our master dissertation investigated a ‘bottom-up’ approach to structural design by means of prototyping, a subcategory of digital fabrication. The design of a small pavilion, the Exoskeleton, served as a test case.

Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol

This ‘bottom-up’ approach allowed for working in an empirical way; new ideas were validated through immediate physical testing of their constructional behavior. In this way the

Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol
Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol
Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol
Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol
Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol
Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol
Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol
Courtesy of Jeroen Christiaen & Saskia De Mol
Diagrams
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Diagrams / Construction
Diagram
Continue reading "Architects Create Affordable “Exoskeleton” Pavilion With Modular Woods, Tie Straps and Sliding Joints"

“Unbuilding Walls”: German Pavilion at 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale to Probe Architecture of Division and Integration

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Checkpoint Charlie, photo: Friedhelm Denkeler Checkpoint Charlie, photo: Friedhelm Denkeler As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage, we present the proposal for the German Pavilion at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition 2018 La Biennale di Venezia. Below, the participants describe their contribution in their own words.  For 28 years, Germany has been united – exactly as long as the Berlin Wall existed (1961–1989). On the occasion of this parallel, GRAFT and Marianne Birthler are curating the exhibition “Unbuilding Walls” at the German Pavilion at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice.
Axel-Springer-Campus, image: courtesy of OMA Axel-Springer-Campus, image: courtesy of OMA

The exhibition responds to current debates on nations, protectionism and division. In the German Pavilion, GRAFT and Marianne Birthler will take the parallel as an opportunity to explore the effects of division and the process of healing as a dynamic spatial phenomenon. With reference to “Freespace,” the central theme of the Architecture Biennale proposed by Grafton Architects, special focus

Vacha, photo: Jürgen Ritter
Lars Krückeberg, Thomas Willemeit, Marianne Birthler and Wolfram Putz, photo: Pablo Castagnola
Continue reading "“Unbuilding Walls”: German Pavilion at 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale to Probe Architecture of Division and Integration"

MVRDV Reveals Design For Dawn Bridge, A 80m-Long Dual Use Crossing in Shanghai

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© MVRDV © MVRDV The 24-m wide crossing, located near the historical town of Zhujiajiao, will feature spaces for gatherings and scenic views. MVRDV's competition-winning design for a pedestrian bridge is scheduled to be completed by 2019. 
© MVRDV © MVRDV

From the Architect. MVRDV won a competition for Dawn Bridge, Shanghai, a new 80m-long dual use crossing conceived as a landmark for fostering daily life and social activities. The bridge is located near the historical town of Zhujiajiao, between the famous Fangsheng Bridge and the low-key Qingpu Road Bridge. The 24m-wide bridge signals to the future of the area, with a design that adds value to its surrounding, fostering social activities at the riverfront. Completion is anticipated for 2019.

© MVRDV © MVRDV

Dawn Bridge lies between new residential developments at the edge of Zhujiajiao and close to the historical crossing of Fangsheng Bridge, a landmark since 1571. The bridge establishes a relationship with

© MVRDV
© MVRDV
© MVRDV
Continue reading "MVRDV Reveals Design For Dawn Bridge, A 80m-Long Dual Use Crossing in Shanghai"

Winners of the 2018 Building of the Year Awards

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With nearly 100,000 votes cast during the last two weeks, we are happy to present the winners of the 2018 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards. This peer-based, crowdsourced architecture award showcases projects chosen by ArchDaily readers who filtered thousands of projects down to the 15 best works featured on ArchDaily in 2017.

As in previous years, the winners showcase a wide spectrum of different types of building, giving an insight into how diverse the profession has become in recent decades. High-profile practices take their place as ever, with winners such as Foster + Partners’ Apple Store in Chicago and OMA’s office building in the Hague showing that establishment firms are still able to make their mark, as in more traditional award systems. Alongside these are previously unsung heroes, such as Emergency Architecture & Human Rights with their series of classrooms for the children of the Za’atari refugee camp in

© Jesus Granada
© Nigel Young
© Iwan Baan
© Leonardo Finotti
© Alejandro Arango
© Nguyen Thai Thach
© Koji Fuji / Nacasa & Partners Inc
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Floto+Warner
Photograph by Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti, © OMA
© Iwan Baan
Courtesy of ARCHSTUDIO
© Martina Rubino
© Haiting Sun
Continue reading "Winners of the 2018 Building of the Year Awards"

Show Us Your Best Architectural Model Photos!

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A model of Peter Zumthor's Saint Benedict Chapel, built for Kenneth Frampton's "Studies in Tectonic Culture" class at Columbia GSAPP and <a href='https://www.archdaily.com/805658/these-intricate-architectural-models-will-change-how-you-see-their-famous-full-size-counterparts'>photographed by James Ewing for the exhibition "Stagecraft: Models and Photos"</a>. Image © James Ewing, Courtesy Columbia GSAPP A model of Peter Zumthor's Saint Benedict Chapel, built for Kenneth Frampton's "Studies in Tectonic Culture" class at Columbia GSAPP and <a href='https://www.archdaily.com/805658/these-intricate-architectural-models-will-change-how-you-see-their-famous-full-size-counterparts'>photographed by James Ewing for the exhibition "Stagecraft: Models and Photos"</a>. Image © James Ewing, Courtesy Columbia GSAPP For a lot of architects, models hold a special place in our hearts. Whereas a building can take years to construct and usually can't be drastically altered as it nears completion, a model provides architects with the immediacy and flexibility we crave as designers while also allowing us to feel like we're really making something—a feeling that digital modeling software can rarely provide. Models have even played decisive roles in the careers of many world-famous architects. Peter Zumthor, for example, is known to prefer the tactility of models over other forms of representation, while early in his career Steven Holl gained recognition for his visionary "Bridge of Houses"
Continue reading "Show Us Your Best Architectural Model Photos!"

Best Modern Examples of Ancient Courtyard Renovations in China

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© Fangfang Tian © Fangfang Tian Chinese courtyard houses are one of the most common housing typologies spanning all the way from the northern capital of Beijing to the poetic southern cities Hangzhou and back to the picturesque regions of Yunnan. Typically referred as heyuan, these courtyards homes are simply a “yard enclosed on four sides."  Traditionally, heyuans were large single-family homes, built to house multiple generations of descendants, thus the essential gathering place for micro-communities. Today, however, many heyuans in China are faced with the challenges of encroaching urban development. The national reforms of the 1950’s divided up many existing courtyards to be occupied by multiple families and groups, exhausting ancient sanitation systems nationwide. These practical circumstances together with market-driven conditions have sparked a renewed interest among architects, to upgrade the conditions of these ancient courtyards and explore the spatial and conceptual possibilities of the typology within their fast-changing urban
© Mingming Zhang
© Ruijing Photo
Courtesy of People's Architecture Office (PAO)
© Feng Shao
© Shengliang Su
© Hao Chen
© Fangfang Tian
Courtesy of hyperSity Architects
© CreatAR
© Weiqi Jin
© Ning Wang
© Chaoying Yang, Su Chen
© Haiting Sun
© Haiting Sun, Chen Bai
Courtesy of Atelier Archmixing
© Weiqi Jin, Ning Wang
Courtesy of GOA
Continue reading "Best Modern Examples of Ancient Courtyard Renovations in China"

Spotlight: Alvar Aalto

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Säynätsalo Town Hall. Image © Fernanda Castro Säynätsalo Town Hall. Image © Fernanda Castro As one of the key figures of midcentury Modernism and perhaps Finland's most celebrated architect, Alvar Aalto (3 February 1898 – 11 May 1976) was known for his humanistic approach to Modernism. For his characteristically Finnish take on architecture, Aalto has become a key reference point for architecture in the Nordic countries, and his commitment to creating a total work of art left many examples of his design genius not only in buildings but also in their interior features, including furniture, lamps, and glassware design.
via Wikimedia (public domain) via Wikimedia (public domain)
Muuratsalo Experimental House. Image © Nico Saieh Muuratsalo Experimental House. Image © Nico Saieh

Aalto was born in Alajärvi in central Finland and raised for most of his young life in Jyväskylä. After completing his studies at the Helsinki University of Technology, in 1923 he founded his own practice (named "Alvar Aalto, Architect and Monumental Artist") in Jyväskylä. His early works were characteristic examples of Nordic Classicism,

Viipuri Library. Image © Denis Esakov
Säynätsalo Town Hall. Image © <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:SaynatsaloTownHall.jpg'>Wikimedia user Zache</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
MIT Baker House Dormitory. Image © <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Baker_House,_MIT,_Cambridge,_Massachusetts.JPG'>Wikimedia user Daderot</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Wolfsburg Cultural Center. Image © Samuel Ludwig
Continue reading "Spotlight: Alvar Aalto"

2018 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards: The Finalists

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2018 has been an unprecedented year for ArchDaily’s Building of the Year Awards.

But before we get to shortlisted nominees, we want to emphasize the values embodied by this awards process. As the world’s largest platform for architecture we are acutely aware of our responsibility to the profession, and to the advancement of architecture as a discipline. Since our mission is directly related to the architecture of the future—in inspiring and educating the global community of architects who will design the urban fabric of the future—the trust placed in us by our readers to reflect architectural trends from regions around the whole world creates challenges that we are eager to rise to. The democratically-voted, user-centered Building of the Year Awards is one of the key pillars of our response to these challenges, aiming to tear down established hierarchies and geographical barriers.

By participating in the process, the ArchDaily community decides

Continue reading "2018 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards: The Finalists"

Urban Equipment for Public Spaces Helps to Build a Bike-Friendly City

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Bike Lockers | Reliance Foundry Bike Lockers | Reliance Foundry Designing public spaces without considering the circulation and parking of bicycles is no longer an option in today's world. Accessibility for the free traffic of cyclists must also be accompanied by adequate security conditions, incorporating these devices in the best possible way to parks, sidewalks, parking lots, and the streetscape as a whole.  Are you designing an urban space, or do the exteriors of your project require a correct link with the circulation of bicycles? Check these support elements that can help you to generate a better city for the urban commuter on wheels.

Bike Parking Bollards

Made of aluminum, steel, or ductile iron, the bollards allow separating the circulations of cars, cyclists, and pedestrians, at the same time to function as bicycle storage devices. Accommodating 2 bicycles per unit, each bollard can be installed permanently or can be temporarily removed if necessary, depending on how
Bike Parking Bollards | Reliance Foundry. Image Courtesy of Reliance Foundry
Bike Parking Bollards | Reliance Foundry
Bike Parking Bollards | Reliance Foundry
Bike Parking Bollards | Reliance Foundry
R-7972 Bike Bollard - 5 Available Mounting Options
R-7972 Bike Bollard - Removable Receiver with Lid
R-7972 Bike Bollard - Removable Receiver with Chain
R-7972 Bike Bollard - Fixed Installation in New Concrete
R-7972 Bike Bollard - Flanged / Surface Mount
R-7972 Bike Bollard - Fold Down Mount
Commercial Bike Racks | Reliance Foundry. Image Courtesy of Reliance Foundry
Commercial Bike Racks | Reliance Foundry
Commercial Bike Racks | Reliance Foundry
R-8212 Inverted U-Rack - Embedded Mounting / Flanged Mounting
R-8212 Inverted U-Rack - Bike Rack Spacing
R-8212 Inverted U-Rack - Embedded Mounting
R-8212 Inverted U-Rack - Flanged Mounting
Bike Lockers | Reliance Foundry. Image Courtesy of Reliance Foundry
Bike Lockers | Reliance Foundry
Bike Lockers | Reliance Foundry
Bike Lockers | Reliance Foundry
Continue reading "Urban Equipment for Public Spaces Helps to Build a Bike-Friendly City"

AIA Responds to Actions Taken by 25 States to Reduce Architectural Licensure Requirements

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Courtesy of AIA Courtesy of AIA

With a growing number of states choosing to rollback professional architectural licensure requirements, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) has issued a “Where We Stand” statement calling for the reinforcement of the practice, which they believe stand to “protect the health, safety and welfare of the public and shield consumers from unqualified practitioners.”

According to the AIA, over the past 5 years, legislative or executive actions have been taken in at least 25 states to impose the “least restrictive regulations” for professional licensure, with several states recommending the elimination of all licenses in the state.

While these actions are likely taken with the goal of lowering barriers to competition and increasing job opportunities, the AIA believes they also have the unintended potential to diminish the overall standard of practice and accountability given to existing professionals.

"The essential purpose of licensing architects is to protect the

Continue reading "AIA Responds to Actions Taken by 25 States to Reduce Architectural Licensure Requirements"

Free Resume Templates for Architects

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What's a better way to follow up on one of our most popular posts (of all time) than by providing a key design tool: the mighty template. Many of you enjoyed seeing the examples of CVs and resumes submitted by ArchDaily readers, but you also asked for a simple, fast way to jump start inspiration for your own creations.  Here are five hand-picked, well-organized, easy-to-use templates that have been downloaded and tested by our team of editors. 

1. Minimalistic & Clean Resume by Mats-Peter Forss

© Mats-Peter Forss © Mats-Peter Forss

Available formats: .psd, .ai
Download instructions: Click here. Scroll down to "Download for Free." You'll be taken to another site where you must enter your email to receive access to the download. 

2. Simple Resume by Bro Luthfi

© Bro Luthfi © Bro Luthfi

Available formats: .psd, .eps, .ai
Download instructions: Click here. Scroll down to "Download for Free." This link will

© Mats-Peter Forss
© Amy Dozier
© Hloom
Continue reading "Free Resume Templates for Architects"

The Best Architecture Portfolio Designs

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When applying for an architecture job, you need to make sure you have the perfect portfolio. While a clever and attractive business card might help you initially get a firm's attention, and a well-considered résumé or CV might help you prove your value, in most cases it will be your portfolio that makes or breaks your application. It's your portfolio that practices will use to measure your design sensibilities against the office's own style and to judge whether you match up to the talents claimed in your résumé. That's why in March, we launched a call for our readers to send us their own portfolios so that we could share the best design ideas with the ArchDaily community. Our selection below shows the best of the nearly 200 submissions we received, which were judged not on the quality of the architectural design they showed (though much of it was excellent) but
Submitted by Gregory Barber
Submitted by Gregory Barber
Submitted by Gregory Barber
Submitted by Vingan Razvan
Submitted by Vingan Razvan
Submitted by Vingan Razvan
Submitted by Wilmer Coronado Castillo
Submitted by Wilmer Coronado Castillo
Submitted by Wilmer Coronado Castillo
Submitted by Derek Pirozzi
Submitted by Derek Pirozzi
Submitted by Derek Pirozzi
Submitted by Rina Ben Shimol
Submitted by Cristóbal Riffo
Submitted by Cristóbal Riffo
Submitted by Cristóbal Riffo
Submitted by Miguel Roig Burgal
Submitted by Miguel Roig Burgal
Submitted by Miguel Roig Burgal
Submitted by Li Dai
Submitted by Li Dai
Submitted by Li Dai
Submitted by Maël Barbe
Submitted by Maël Barbe
Submitted by Maël Barbe
Submitted by Benjamin Wichman
Submitted by Benjamin Wichman
Submitted by Benjamin Wichman
Submitted by Benjamin Wichman
Submitted by Eytan Levi
Submitted by Eytan Levi
Submitted by Eytan Levi
Submitted by Eytan Levi
Submitted by Aayush Jindal
Submitted by Aayush Jindal
Submitted by Aayush Jindal
Submitted by Lazar Belic
Submitted by Lazar Belic
Submitted by Lazar Belic
Submitted by Thea Mihu
Submitted by Thea Mihu
Submitted by Thea Mihu
Submitted by Bastian Marzoli
Submitted by Bastian Marzoli
Submitted by Bastian Marzoli
Submitted by Bastian Marzoli
Submitted by Keyhan Khaki
Submitted by Keyhan Khaki
Submitted by Keyhan Khaki
Submitted by Pilar Ribot Reus
Submitted by Pilar Ribot Reus
Submitted by Pilar Ribot Reus
Continue reading "The Best Architecture Portfolio Designs"

Micro-Scale Modeling: How to Construct Tiny, Intricate Worlds From Ordinary Materials

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© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram © Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram Joshua Smith, a miniaturist and former stencil artist based in South Australia, constructs tiny, intricate worlds for a living. His work, which exhibits astonishing observational and representational skills, focuses on the "overlooked aspects of the urban environment – such as grime, rust and decay to discarded cigarettes and graffiti," all recreated at a scale of 1:20. Smith, who has been making model kits for around a decade, only recently chose to move away from a 16-year-long career creating stencil art. With his creative talents now focused on model-making, and all those skills which accompany the craft, ArchDaily asks: how do you do it?
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram © Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram

AD: Take us through your modeling process! JS: First of all I find the building I want to replicate, either in person or using Google Maps Street View. From there I start to reverse

© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
© Andrew Beveridge / ASB Creative Instagram
Continue reading "Micro-Scale Modeling: How to Construct Tiny, Intricate Worlds From Ordinary Materials"

Melbournites Protest Plans for Apple’s First Southern Hemisphere Flagship Store Over Secrecy of Approval Process

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Courtesy of Apple Courtesy of Apple

Plans announced last month for Apple’s first global flagship store in the southern hemisphere have prompted outrage among Melbournites, who are criticizing the complete lack of public input in the project’s approval process.

The new three-story building, designed by Foster + Partners, would require the demolition of the existing Yarra Building, and would change the character of Federation Square, a popular public location for gatherings and events. But before being announced, the project was already fast-tracked through the first stage of planning approval, thanks to a partnership with the city.

Courtesy of Apple Courtesy of Apple

In response to this secrecy, and to the plans themselves, a petition on Change.org to prevent the Yarra Building’s demolition has already gathered over 40,000 signatures, and a number of notable figures from the world of architecture and planning have already spoken out, including Laura Murray of the Planning Institute Australia,

© Flickr user vincentq. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
Continue reading "Melbournites Protest Plans for Apple’s First Southern Hemisphere Flagship Store Over Secrecy of Approval Process"

The World’s Best Cities 2018

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Ranking cities is a risky endeavor. How can one be objective and fair when this great earth and its 7.6 billion inhabitants would never come to anything close to a consensus? And yet global consulting firm Resonance Consultancy has taken on the challenge based on the opinions of the people they claim matter most: "a city's visitors and its residents." Surveying the inhabitants and tourists about 23 different factors (that are then grouped into six key categories—Place, Product, Programming, People, Prosperity and Promotion), the methodology aims to be comprehensive in the ranking of quality of place and reputation. In the people category, for example, the surveyors looked at things like the immigration rate and diversity of a city, including number of Foreign-born Residents. Also taken into consideration was the amount of "stories" or "mentions" a city generates on web platforms like Facebook, Google and even TripAdvisor. And, most
Photo by Pedro Lastra on Unsplash
Photo by Patrik Göthe on Unsplash
Photo by Erwan Hesry on Unsplash
Photo by David Rodrigo on Unsplash
Photo by Mike Enerio on Unsplash
Photo by Andre Benz on Unsplash
Photo by Astemir Almov on Unsplash
Photo by Ilnur Kalimullin on Unsplash
Photo by jonathan riley on Unsplash
Photo by Paddy Kumar on Unsplash
Continue reading "The World’s Best Cities 2018"

The Best Architecture of 2017

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To our readers and fans,

As we approach the end of the year, we would once again like to thank you all for making 2017 our best year yet. With your continued support, we are now reaching more architects around the globe than ever, and inspiring them in the creation of better urban environments for all.

On behalf of the entire ArchDaily team, we are excited to share this collection of 2017's most visited projects, products, and articles. Together with our curated selection of the year's most relevant and noteworthy articles and events, these represent the best content created and shared by ArchDaily over the past 12 months.

Here's to a wonderful, architecture-filled 2018!
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