Lo & Sons’ The Catalina large canvas weekender…

Lo & Sons’ The Catalina large canvas weekender – “soft yet sturdy 20-oz pre-washed cotton canvas” with a nice “Bottom zipper pocket to separate your beach towels or sandals from dry clothes”…

(Want more? See NOTCOT.org and NOTCOT.com)

UA architects – Shirasagi Museum, Utsunomiya 2013. Via. 

UA architects – Shirasagi Museum, Utsunomiya 2013. Via

Apartment kitchen design with all the mod cons

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Vitamin D: Kill ‘Em With Kindness

Vitamin D: Kill ‘Em With Kindness

(click on the image for a larger version)

Monday Misery loves company, so let’s all groan about it together. However, no matter how daunting, frustrating, annoying, or just plain mean something or someone seems, facing it with a smile always makes you better for it.

About the designer: Shauna Lynn Panczyszyn is a Florida-based graphic designer, hand letterer and illustrator located who has some seriously killer work under her belt for being just 25. Check it out on her site, shaunaparmesan.com.

We’ll do a few of these on the site, but then we’ll probably keep this series going on Instagram. Let us know in the comments if you’d like to continue seeing these here on the blog. Want to do one? Get in touch!


The Architecture Foundation Presents: Three Conversations on “Culture + Commerce”


Having wrapped up their three part series And the Winner is…?, has launched another trio of evening discussions, this time around the ever-encroaching commercial values which are increasingly threatening cultural venues in London. The series, entitled Culture + Commerce, will explore how culture can fight against commercial homogeneity in the face of reduced public funding.

Inspired by the ill-fated plan of the Southbank centre to evict the long-established skateboarders in favour of commercial units, the series will investigate issues such as how free-market systems might be adapted in favour of culture, how loopholes in established planning law could be exploited to protect cultural venues (such as a bold campaign by the Southbank Skateboarders to get the undercroft protected as a village green), and whether self-build projects and co-housing initiatives could be the solution to circumnavigate the strangled housing market.

The events scheduled are:

  • Money Talks, a discussion around the question “can the logic of markets be re-routed to help create an economic platform for alternative businesses?” – Monday 9th September, 7pm
  • Appropriate Measures, “an exploration of the creative legal loopholes that might be employed to stall the city’s mall-ification.” – Wednesday 11th September, 7pm.
  • If I Had a Hammer, an investigation into the current trend towards participatory housing schemes which may provide cash-strapped house hunters with an alternative to the traditional housing market. Date and Time TBC

Title: Culture + Commerce: Designs For a Different City
Website: http://www.architecturefoundation.org.uk/programme/2013/culture-commerce
Organizers: The Architecture Foundation
From: Thu, 19 Sep 2013 00:00
Until: Sun, 22 Sep 2013 00:00
Venue: The Architecture Foundation
Address: 136-148 Tooley Street, London Borough of Southwark, London SE1 2TU, UK

"The Psicobloc Masters Series is the first…

“The Psicobloc Masters Series is the first major deep-water soloing competition held in the U.S. Climbers competed head-to-head on identical routes up a 50-foot wall, no ropes or harnesses, just a massive swimming pool below to catch their fall.”

(Want more? See NOTCOT.org and NOTCOT.com)

OnBeat Solar Headphones

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“The addition of real-world imperfections is taking architectural visualisation to the next level”



Interview: following the popularity of the hyper-realistic computer renderings of Staithe End house that we published earlier in the month, Henry Goss, the architect and visualiser who produced the renders, talks to Dezeen about how 3D visualisations are becoming indistinguishable from real photographs. (more…)

Baileys Chocolat Luxe combines Belgian…

Baileys Chocolat Luxe combines Belgian chocolate, Irish whiskey, and cream, which marbles beautifully with water… Here’s a peek at the launch with Bompas & Parr filled with Culinary Alchemy, marbled foods, chocolate and rhapsodomancy!

(Want more? See NOTCOT.org and NOTCOT.com)

Los Gatos Residence by Lizette Marie Interior Design

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Scaled Back House by ROOVICE

Scaled Back House by ROOVICE

Rarely do renovations mean reducing the overall size of a house, but that’s just what happened in the case of this two-story, 43 year old house in Kamakura City, Kanagawa, Japan. The Scaled Back House was previously renovated before the current owner moved in four years ago, but the front part was left untouched. The previous owner, a novelist, used the front part as a waiting lobby for editors but for the most part, it was a lot of unused space. The owners wanted more room for parking so they hired ROOVICE to scale back and renovate the front of the house.

Scaled Back House by ROOVICE in architecture Category

The larger part of the home remained untouched during the renovation so the new facade was linked to the existing structure.

Scaled Back House by ROOVICE in architecture Category

The outer front wall became a simple facade that traced the cross section of the house. Clad with gray mortar, the newer part blends smoothly with the older structure creating continuity.

Scaled Back House by ROOVICE in architecture Category

By reducing the home’s footprint, they were able to not only achieve the perfect cozy home for their family, they were able to create a more energy efficient house with reduced maintenance costs.

Scaled Back House by ROOVICE in architecture Category

Scaled Back House by ROOVICE in architecture Category

I love the simplicity of the front entrance and facade, from the unadorned block steps to the delicate white overhang above the door.

Scaled Back House by ROOVICE in architecture Category

Scaled Back House by ROOVICE in architecture Category

Scaled Back House by ROOVICE in architecture Category

Before photos:

Scaled Back House by ROOVICE in architecture Category

Scaled Back House by ROOVICE in architecture Category

Scaled Back House by ROOVICE in architecture Category


Smiljan Radic – Casa Chilena, Los Lirios 2006. Via, photos…

Smiljan Radic – Casa Chilena, Los Lirios 2006. Via, photos (C)  Gonzalo Puga.

Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects


Architects: Keitaro Muto Architects
Location: , Prefecture,
Architect In Charge: Keitaro Muto
Structure: Timber
Collaborators: Atushi Fujio
Area: 171.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Yoshiike Teruaki

From the architect. It is located one block away from a main street  in a residence area with stores on the east side, there is a field on the west side and a rice fields on the north side.

Using spacious scenery of nature from the west and the north side, I was inspired to create a landscape of a ground.

This building has a section structure by using skip floor system and the half of the building is 1.4m above the ground which makes it as if it’s floating in the air. This way we could make more open space in the land.

Most part of the premise is put down lawn so that it blends in the surrounded nature.

By having the half of the building floating in the air by cantilevered beam, it creates a dynamic space under the eaves.

Scenery of nature is also taken into the living room while getting the sunlight from the afternoon sun.

The section structure is used for a living room with skip floor system and we could create the high ceilings of 6.4m.

Combining different dimensions of 1.4m, 2.4m, and 6.4m height, it gives a dynamic feeling although it’s compact and simple structure.

The eaves connect from the inside of the house to the outer space. It’s almost made for kids’s courtyard. I’m hoping the family will enjoy the eaves.

Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects © Yoshiike Teruaki
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects Floor Plan
Kawate / Keitaro Muto Architects Section

Villa Nuevo in Austin by Webber + Studio Architects

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Lillagunga – a beautifully, simple finnish…

Lillagunga – a beautifully, simple finnish wooden swing. Instead of knots, the three hole button is all you need to secure the marine string. (Very similar to the IKEA swing knot.)

(Want more? See NOTCOT.org and NOTCOT.com)

James Turrell and Robert Irwin

This summer in New York we are having a rare dose of major works from the West coast’s “Light and Space” movement.  That phrase Light and Space always makes me think first of Light and Air, that penultimate duo of Depression-era tenement reform and the 1916 New York City zoning

The major Light and Space exhibition this summer is, of course, James Turrell at Guggenheim.  The main focus of the exhibit is Turrell’s Aten Reign installation, which takes over the Guggenheim rotunda.  The work both repeats and obscures the ramps and the rotunda’s skylight, in a way that could only make me compare the two, like a renovation that one unpeels in the imagination.  To get myself out of this misplaced design-mind, I walked slowly up the ramp, but this only made it worse, as one can peer through the mesh and start to make out the scaffolding. 

Conceptually, though, I was surprised the work had such a clear back and front.  The piece seems to rely on a specific orchestration of movement th…

A Comeback for Arne Jacobsen’s Tongue Chair

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It must be said: our tongues are wagging. The fact that a chair—any chair—by the legendary Arne Jacobsen has managed to go unnoticed for this long is plainly mystifying, but kudos to Danish brand HOWE for seeing the wisdom in reintroducing Jacobsen’s understated, sculptural Tongue Chair.

Jacobsen conceived of Tongue, said to be one of his favorite designs, in 1955 for the Munkegård School in Denmark, and it was subsequently used in the Jacobsen-designed SAS Royal Hotel, Copenhagen, where the exalted Egg chair reigns supreme; but, save for a brief period in the 1980′s, Tongue has remained in hiding—until now.

In reviving this quintessentially reductive Jacobsen creation, HOWE has adhered to the Danish architect’s original specs, while applying state-of-the-art technology to improve the structural integrity of its gently curving, single-piece profile. Available in leather and veneer finishes, and a range of muted fabric tones, we’re predicting mouth-watering success for this Tongue.

download_pagedetail_obsessed_4tongue_chair_1-2detail_obsesseddezeen_Tongue-chair-by-Arne-Jacobsen-relaunched-by-Howe_2dezeen_Tongue-chair-by-Arne-Jacobsen-relaunched-by-Howe_6dezeen_Tongue-chair-by-Arne-Jacobsen-relaunched-by-Howe_4

Images: Howe, Dezeen

Tetris Magnet Set

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Giacomo Rocker by Michael Yates

Giacomo Rocker by Michael Yates

Michael Yates sent over his Giacomo Rocker design, a simple wood rocker accented by cord seating.

At first I was feeling that there was a disproportion between the top and the bottom, but then I started to really like it and appreciate the oversized legs and rocker. It feels a little bit like Japanese design meets Craftsman. It’s also available in white oak.

Giacomo Rocker by Michael Yates in home furnishings Category

Giacomo Rocker by Michael Yates in home furnishings Category

Giacomo Rocker by Michael Yates in home furnishings Category

Giacomo Rocker by Michael Yates in home furnishings Category

Buy it here.

Photos by Dennis Burnett.


Successful Workplaces Balance Focus and Collaboration, Gensler Study Finds


Gensler, who recently topped out on the world’s second tallest skyscraper in Shanghai, have just released a report outlining the keys to designing a successful workplace. Using their custom ‘Workplace Performance Index’ they surveyed 2035 office workers in the US to find out what makes employees happy and productive in their workplace.

One surprising result which they uncovered is that, in opposition to the trend of workplaces being designed to encourage collaboration, workers are actually spending more time on focused, individual tasks than they were 5 years ago. Consequently, over 50% of respondents said that they were distracted by others when they needed to focus. What’s more, the survey found that when employees could not focus individually, collaborative work was also less productive.

Read on after the break to find out more results from the survey

This did not mean that workplaces should exclusively be designed for focus, however. The study found that workers still spend around a quarter of their time in collaboration with colleagues, and that the best way to design a successful workplace was to provide the right balance between spaces which allow employees to focus, and spaces which allow them to collaborate with others – most importantly making sure that these spaces do not interfere with each other.

Workplaces that achieve this balance not only allow their employees to be more productive, but also improve employees’ perception of the company they work for: employees who had a balanced office environment overwhelmingly ranked their companies more highly in every measurement category, believing the companies they worked at encouraged innovation and had creative employees.

also found one key to successful workplaces that has really gained ground in recent years: choice of work environments. With the huge increase in communication tools made possible by the internet, the study found that companies which allowed flexible work hours, the opportunity to work from home and a variety of spaces to work from within an office were much more productive.

The study found that offering this kind of choice and autonomy to employees made companies more productive, boosted growth and reduced staff turnover. As a result, designing a successful workplace is not just a matter of spatial design; it also includes providing the right tools and designing protocols which allow employees the autonomy to find their own most effective ways of working.