Lytro Illum: The Storyteller’s Digital Camera

Lytro Illum: The Storyteller’s Digital Camera Back in 2011 Lytro caught the photography world by surprise by introducing a camera unlike any other, a rectangular monocular with the capability of instantly refocusing focal points of photographs at the tap of a screen. The original Lytro was an “ahhh” and “oooh” eliciting interactive technological feat of light field photography, but its real world application limited by a small display, modest image quality, and to a lesser extent, its unusual shape categorizing it as a curiosity. Lytro is back with a second generation model addressing many of the issues and features photography enthusiasts asked for, in a form factor that may seem more recognizably comfortable and welcome to those accustomed to DSLR photography, and equipped with just about everything the initial model was missing. The Lytro Illum is an upgrade across the board compared to the first model’s fixed lens design, with an 8x zoom equivalent of a 30-250 mm lens at f/2.0 aperture across its whole range, a roomier 800×400 pixel resolution 4” touchscreen display, and a new image sensor capable of absorbing 40 million light rays to generate multi-dimensional “living pictures” with a sense of depth and simulated motion beyond traditional tilt shift photographs. Lytro Illum: The Storyteller’s Digital Camera in technology Category Lytro Illum: The Storyteller’s Digital Camera in technology Category Lytro Illum: The Storyteller’s Digital Camera in technology Category The most noticeable departure in Lytro’s update is the Illum’s streamlined DSLR-like form factor, a design which may convince the curious and previously hesitant to give the new second generation camera a try, alongside the addition of photographer’s staples of program, ISO priority, shutter priority, full manual shooting modes, and Photoshop/Lightroom/Aperture support to round out an evolutionary progression for light field photography into the mainstream. Lytro Illum: The Storyteller’s Digital Camera in technology Category Lytro Illum: The Storyteller’s Digital Camera in technology Category Lytro Illum: The Storyteller’s Digital Camera in technology Category The Lytro Illum will be available in July for $1,599, with a special offer pre-order $100 discount which throws in complimentary personalized engraving and special camera strap.






The Steel Age Is Over. Has The Next Age Begun?

Andrew Carnegie once said, “Aim for the highest.” He followed his own advice. The powerful 19th century steel magnate had the foresight to build a bridge spanning the Mississippi river, a total of 6442 feet. In 1874, the primary structural material was iron — steel was the new kid on the block. People were wary of steel, scared of it even. It was an unproven alloy. Nevertheless, after the completion of Eads Bridge in St. Louis, Andrew Carnegie generated a publicity stunt to prove steel was in fact a viable building material. A popular superstition of the day stated that an elephant would not cross an unstable bridge. On opening day, a confident Carnegie, the people of St. Louis and a four-ton elephant proceeded to cross the bridge. The elephant was met on the other side with pompous fanfare. What ensued was the greatest vertical building boom in American , with Chicago and New York pioneering the cause. That’s right people; you can thank an adrenaline-junkie elephant for changing American opinion on the safety of steel . So if steel replaced iron – as iron replaced bronze and bronze, copper –  what will replace steel? Carbon Fiber.
You’ve probably heard of it. Carbon Fiber is that super high-tech woven nano-fiberused in professional bicycles and racecar bodies. It’s the ultimate material – five times stronger than steel, twice as stiff, weighing significantly less – this is the featherweight champion of materials. Unfortunately, carbon fiber is still seen as novelty, and while it has been applied in small-scale building projects such as pavilions, the carbon fiber skyscraper idea hasn’t yet hatched. Why not? People – including designers – are wary of carbon fiber, scared of it even. Engineers in the automotive and aerospace industries may utilize and push the material to extreme limits, but R&D in architecture is moving at a snail’s pace. But why? Architects should be drooling over this stuff. The material properties of carbon fiber allow for architectural innovation never previously imaginable. When CADD software was originally released, it allowed architects to push steel to its threshold. This is the reverse. Carbon fiber drives the computer to its threshold. Imagine SHoP Architect’s recently completed Barclay’s Center without the tons of resource and labor intensive rebar. And with the first carbon fiber 3d printer hitting the market this summer, it is not impossible to imagine a world where we print buildings stronger than steel.
Of course there are drawbacks to carbon fiber. In turn, the naysayers emerge. Yes, it is a brittle material, less likely to bend than its steel counterpart. Perhaps more significant, it’s a material in infancy. The youth of carbon fiber makes it expensive. Whereas steel is less than a buck a pound, carbon fiber is ten dollars a pound to produce -. This youth also means carbon fiber production is annoyingly slow. However, carbon fiber’s journey is mirroring the growing pains of steel. In fact, the lethargic, cost-intensive process of producing steel led Eads Bridge construction to come to a screeching halt. Causing one of the richest men in history to nearly go bankrupt. But Carnegie didn’t go bankrupt. He adapted a process designed by inventor/engineer Henry Bessemer to mass-produce steel. Bessemer’s processes meant a steel beam that once took five hours, now took ten minutes — hello industrial revolution. With a revolutionary material and all of his eggs in one giant basket, Carnegie became, for a time, the richest man in the world. At this very moment, carbon fiber needs the investors like Andrew Carnegie that steel had. Carbon fiber needs the inventors like Henry Bessemer that steel had. Sure, there are still a few kinks to work out, but when those discoveries are made, an architectural and industrial revolution will occur. Carbon fiber has the ability to be mass-produced in a cheap and sustainable way; we just need to figure it out. Once we do, we can work on getting that elephant across the bridge. Interested in more Materials? Check out our new US product catalog, ArchDaily Materials.

A Seductive Abstraction: Architecture & Photography’s Tacit Pact

ArchDaily has partnered with The Architectural Review to bring you short thematic introductions to the magazine’s monthly editions.  Up now: AR’s April 2014 issue, which examines the complexities of architecture . Editor Catherine Slessor asks “what happens when controlled views of buildings are redefined by and adapted to new technologies?”

Roland Barthes once observed that there is no such thing as a photograph. ‘Whatever it grants to vision and whatever its manner, a photograph is always invisible, it is not it that we see’, he wrote in Camera Lucida. What we do see is the scrutinising gaze of the photographer, which can beguile or unsettle, but should always evoke some kind of response.

As a scientific and ‘truthful’ medium, photography has served architecture well, especially in the Modernist era when the evolving medium synthesised perfectly with a new approach to design. Yet the relationship between architecture and photography is an inherently compromised one. Unlike art practice, architectural photography lends itself less to searching critical enquiry, being essentially an unspoken pact between architect, photographer and publisher to render buildings in a way that discreetly flatters architectural ambition and sells copies of books or magazines.

It can also be argued that the inherent narrowness of the photographic gaze inhibits how architecture is understood and discussed. Architecture is a complex subject, but photography is necessarily selective, and its seductively abstracting tendencies mean that the photographs of buildings often supplant the real thing in the minds of viewers. As the same images of the same buildings sluice around print and digital media, this attention-seeking currency has come to define what architecture is, often to the detriment of the local, the nuanced and the particular. The idea of how buildings fare in use, or have worked over time, which is critical to the wider learning process, is also anathema to this condensed spectrum of visual appreciation.

But for better or worse, we are all architectural photographers now, endlessly snapping and sharing. Digital has liberated the discipline from the constraints of lumbering and costly equipment, while Photoshop can iron out any unpalatable wrinkles. Shifts in have also been accompanied by shifts in perception. The notion of buildings statically posed against a perpetual blue sky and generally devoid of people has now been supplanted by the more informal, verité approach of photographers such as Iwan Baan, whose exhaustive exploits are chronicled in this month’s issue.

Within the rather genteel milieu of architectural photographers, Baan is a phenomenon: a Flying Dutchman constantly girding the globe in pursuit of images. Like an architectural version of Mario Testino, he is the starchitects’ photographer du jour, documenting their buildings in a way that has become as distinctive and era-defining as Julius Shulman’s moody, monochrome shots of Californian Case Study Houses. Yet despite the nomadic, rock-star lifestyle, he is also drawn to more marginal architectural currents and locales; emblematic of a sensitivity that goes beyond simply nailing the latest commission.

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A Seductive Abstraction: Architecture & Photography's Tacit Pact Courtesy of The Architectural Review A Seductive Abstraction: Architecture & Photography's Tacit Pact Courtesy of The Architectural Review A Seductive Abstraction: Architecture & Photography's Tacit Pact Courtesy of The Architectural Review A Seductive Abstraction: Architecture & Photography's Tacit Pact Courtesy of The Architectural Review A Seductive Abstraction: Architecture & Photography's Tacit Pact Courtesy of The Architectural Review A Seductive Abstraction: Architecture & Photography's Tacit Pact Courtesy of The Architectural Review A Seductive Abstraction: Architecture & Photography's Tacit Pact Courtesy of The Architectural Review

Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel

Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel

Google has been playing slow and careful when it comes to rolling out Google Glass beyond a small, albeit passionate, community of early-adopters and developers known as Explorers. But for a single day last week the doors into the Google Glass Explorer Program were opened up ever so slightly to welcome in an undisclosed amount of new users, selling out all available spots online in quick time to anyone willing to fork over $1,500.

Following the one-day sale was the announcement of a new “try before you buy” program, which allows interested future would-be Glass customers to model non-working trial kits before dropping the serious chunk of change required to wear and weather what is essentially a beta device predicating the inevitable rise of wearable technology.

Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel in technology Category

So let’s say you’re one of the fortunate few to find themselves a new owner of Google Glass. Now what? Meeting with representatives at the Google Glass Basecamp in Chelsea, New York last week, most questions about future developments in Glass capabilities were met with non-specifics, a few raised eyebrows, and the occasional smirk communicating a “just you wait and see” attitude.

Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel in technology Category

What Glass representatives were willing to quickly point out were the numerous 3rd party developers already offering or working on expanding Glass capabilities in the fields of science, art, medicine, sports, and fashion. But it might be the travel industry – a natural fit for Glass’s augmented vision + geolocation technology – which may find its landscape most changed if/when wearable technologies like Glass become commonplace, reinforcing my own experience demoing the latest iteration of Google Glass while visiting New York.

Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel in technology Category

SPG on Glass App
Currently in beta, the SPG on Glass App will allow Starwood Preferred Guests to use Glass to search for hotels via voice commands, tour potential accomodations using a virtual tour, discover nearby sights and attractions, review account information, and book hotel rooms or suites right from Glass. Once a room is reserved, guests can use the Glass app to provide real-time GPS-enabled directions.

Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel in technology Category

Virgin Atlantic x Google Glass
Virgin founder and avid first adopter, Richard Branson, has never been one to shy away from burgeoning future technologies. No surprise he’s had his Virgin Atlantic airline team give Google Glass a test run for a six-week trial, all with the goal of augmenting the airline’s service. Virgin Atlantic 1st Class passengers everywhere may soon find themselves greeted by airline staff donning Glass for tech-enhanced concierge service at airport terminals. A customer’s name, their flight details, passport information, baggage status, connecting flight info, dietary preferences/requirements, car and hotel accommodations, and any other detail are all accessible via Glass.

Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel in technology Category

Google Glass Travel Concierge App
Tourism industry site, Tourism-Review.com, believes Google has their eyes on disrupting the travel industry with a top secret 3G-enabled travel app which will allow users to talk to Glass just like a “real travel agent”, capable of answering “100% of the requests made” using the app, while covering 98% of the request topics normally handled by a real world agent. The app is currently being tested in beta, and will be called “Travel Concierge”, planned for launch this autumn.

Field Trip on Glass
Google Glass isn’t just all about what’s on the horizon. There are a few apps already available which Glass users can download and begin using to augment the travel experience right now. Field Trip on Glass merges augmented reality with a subscription-based enhanced travel guide, a sort of proactive, push-publish extension of Google Now using a visual overlay. With the app loaded, Field Trip aims to answer questions like “what’s good to eat around here?” or “where can I find ____?” before Glass wearers even think to ask.

Word Lens for Google Glass
Now here’s where Glass becomes more clearly and immediately helpful, tackling a common issue when traveling abroad: translating foreign language signs. Using a stored database of about 10,000 words per language, the Word Lens app for Google Glass can translate signs or markers viewed through Google Glass from one language to another in real time, all without a network connection. Those wondering about the technology’s accuracy without Glass on hand can download the free Word Lens app for either iOS or Android to satiate their curiosity today.








Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel

Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel

Google has been playing slow and careful when it comes to rolling out Google Glass beyond a small, albeit passionate, community of early-adopters and developers known as Explorers. But for a single day last week the doors into the Google Glass Explorer Program were opened up ever so slightly to welcome in an undisclosed amount of new users, selling out all available spots online in quick time to anyone willing to fork over $1,500.

Following the one-day sale was the announcement of a new “try before you buy” program, which allows interested future would-be Glass customers to model non-working trial kits before dropping the serious chunk of change required to wear and weather what is essentially a beta device predicating the inevitable rise of wearable technology.

Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel in technology Category

So let’s say you’re one of the fortunate few to find themselves a new owner of Google Glass. Now what? Meeting with representatives at the Google Glass Basecamp in Chelsea, New York last week, most questions about future developments in Glass capabilities were met with non-specifics, a few raised eyebrows, and the occasional smirk communicating a “just you wait and see” attitude.

Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel in technology Category

What Glass representatives were willing to quickly point out were the numerous 3rd party developers already offering or working on expanding Glass capabilities in the fields of science, art, medicine, sports, and fashion. But it might be the travel industry – a natural fit for Glass’s augmented vision + geolocation technology – which may find its landscape most changed if/when wearable technologies like Glass become commonplace, reinforcing my own experience demoing the latest iteration of Google Glass while visiting New York.

Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel in technology Category

SPG on Glass App
Currently in beta, the SPG on Glass App will allow Starwood Preferred Guests to use Glass to search for hotels via voice commands, tour potential accomodations using a virtual tour, discover nearby sights and attractions, review account information, and book hotel rooms or suites right from Glass. Once a room is reserved, guests can use the Glass app to provide real-time GPS-enabled directions.

Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel in technology Category

Virgin Atlantic x Google Glass
Virgin founder and avid first adopter, Richard Branson, has never been one to shy away from burgeoning future technologies. No surprise he’s had his Virgin Atlantic airline team give Google Glass a test run for a six-week trial, all with the goal of augmenting the airline’s service. Virgin Atlantic 1st Class passengers everywhere may soon find themselves greeted by airline staff donning Glass for tech-enhanced concierge service at airport terminals. A customer’s name, their flight details, passport information, baggage status, connecting flight info, dietary preferences/requirements, car and hotel accommodations, and any other detail are all accessible via Glass.

Google Glass Aiming to Transform How We Travel in technology Category

Google Glass Travel Concierge App
Tourism industry site, Tourism-Review.com, believes Google has their eyes on disrupting the travel industry with a top secret 3G-enabled travel app which will allow users to talk to Glass just like a “real travel agent”, capable of answering “100% of the requests made” using the app, while covering 98% of the request topics normally handled by a real world agent. The app is currently being tested in beta, and will be called “Travel Concierge”, planned for launch this autumn.

Field Trip on Glass
Google Glass isn’t just all about what’s on the horizon. There are a few apps already available which Glass users can download and begin using to augment the travel experience right now. Field Trip on Glass merges augmented reality with a subscription-based enhanced travel guide, a sort of proactive, push-publish extension of Google Now using a visual overlay. With the app loaded, Field Trip aims to answer questions like “what’s good to eat around here?” or “where can I find ____?” before Glass wearers even think to ask.

Word Lens for Google Glass
Now here’s where Glass becomes more clearly and immediately helpful, tackling a common issue when traveling abroad: translating foreign language signs. Using a stored database of about 10,000 words per language, the Word Lens app for Google Glass can translate signs or markers viewed through Google Glass from one language to another in real time, all without a network connection. Those wondering about the technology’s accuracy without Glass on hand can download the free Word Lens app for either iOS or Android to satiate their curiosity today.








BOLT: A Small Wall Charger & Battery Backup in One

BOLT: A Small Wall Charger & Battery Backup in One You know it’s a hassle to have to carry around your bulky, USB wall charger, plus a battery backup for your phone, right? BOLT is a small, portable USB wall charger, designed by FLUXMOB, that also has a built-in 3000mAh Li-Ion battery that will recharge your mobile device at anytime. The BOLT is good for 1.5 charges! BOLT: A Small Wall Charger & Battery Backup in One in technology Category It comes with fold-out prongs so you don’t need a separate cable to plug it in. Now you can replace your standard wall charger with the BOLT to eliminate all the bulk when you travel. BOLT: A Small Wall Charger & Battery Backup in One in technology Category BOLT charges most any device that charges via USB, so that means your smartphones, tablets, mp3 players, point and shoot cameras, etc. BOLT: A Small Wall Charger & Battery Backup in One in technology Category BOLT: A Small Wall Charger & Battery Backup in One in technology Category They’re $59.99 and you can purchase them from REIGN23 or FLUXMOB. If you order from REIGN23, enter coupon code ‘designmilk’ at checkout to receive 10% off a BOLT.






Clothes will shrink to fit “at the push of a button” within five years

        <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2014/04/21/movie-studio-xo-lady-gaga-anemone-benjamin-males/">
          <img src="http://static.dezeen.com/uploads/2014/04/lady-gaga-Anemone_square2.jpg" />
        </a>
        <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/minifrontiers/"><b>Dezeen and MINI Frontiers:</b></a> micro-robotics and <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/3d-printing/">3D-printing</a> are poised to revolutionise fashion, says the designer of <a title="Lady Gaga Archive on Dezeen" href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/lady-gaga/">Lady Gaga's</a> bubble-blowing dress, in the second part of <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2014/04/14/movie-studio-xo-lady-gaga-flying-dress-volantis/">our interview</a> with <a href="http://www.studio-xo.com/">Studio XO</a>. <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2014/04/21/movie-studio-xo-lady-gaga-anemone-benjamin-males/" class="more-link">(more...)</a>

Next-Generation Nocs NS500 Aluminum Earphones

Next-Generation Nocs NS500 Aluminum Earphones Stockholm, Sweden based Nocs works with DJs and musicians around the world to gain insight so they can bring you the best speakers and headphones out there. There latest, Nocs NS500 Aluminum, brings the high precision of CNC machining to their aluminum housing so that complex shapes that were once next to impossible, can now be done. Next Generation Nocs NS500 Aluminum Earphones in technology Category The new earphones have a chamfer-cut edge as a design detail. The aluminum housing has a sandblasted finish to provide a scratch resistant and smooth surface. Next Generation Nocs NS500 Aluminum Earphones in technology Category The tangle-free cables are Kevlar-reinforced for durability. They come with a three-button remote to control your music from your iPod, iPhone, iPad, and Android. You can choose from four different-sized ear tips that provide excellent noise cancellation. Next Generation Nocs NS500 Aluminum Earphones in technology Category Best of all, the earphones provide impeccable sound quality that’s well-balanced across the entire sonic spectrum. Nocs’ sound-tuning process takes around six months, so you know there goal is provide listeners with top-quality sound. They’re currently available for pre-order and will be shipping in May.






REX’s Joshua Prince-Ramus Unwraps His Approach to Facade Design

Joshua Prince-Ramus, principal at REX, has a bone to pick with modernism and its legacy. “For the last 100 years, architecture’s been involved in a silly tension between form and function,” he said. While high modernism privileged function over form, some of today’s top designers argue that architecture is about aesthetics and not much else. […]

Friday Five with Dirk Vander Kooij

Friday Five with Dirk Vander Kooij You might recall Dirk Vander Kooij’s name from when we featured his mind-blowing Chubby Chairs last year during our ICFF 2013 coverage and our ICFF video. The Dutch designer became inspired by an old 3D printer while working on his graduation project at the Design Academy in Eindhoven, but the one downside was not having the ability to print large objects, like pieces of furniture. The wheels began to turn and he figured out a way to make it happen and became the first person to succeed in printing larger objects, thanks to a machine he invented. The machine recycles plastic and basically squirts it out like cake icing into whatever shape he chooses. Sticking with his philosophy that “process is just as important as the ultimate product,” Vander Kooij keeps cranking out cool wares. This week, he shares with us his favorite things in this edition of Friday Five. Friday Five with Dirk Vander Kooij in technology home furnishings Category 1. My bicycle
My bike is a pure example of simplicity. As you can see there are no ornaments or even gears or handbrakes. I love products that are effective and what you see is what you get. The frame is made of aluminium, so the bike is very lightweight and still not fragile or unstable. The wheels are solid and quite big. No stickers, no nothing, just the way it is. For me an example of a honest product that is made for its functionality. Friday Five with Dirk Vander Kooij in technology home furnishings Category 2. Lathe
This lathe is absolutely one of my favorites in my workshop. A brutal machine but beautiful at the same time. Its handles work in a way like a clock mechanism; one turn is exactly one millimeter and every wheel and gear has its own function that’s always aligned to the metrical or English system. A piece that shows the craft of the ones that designed it a long time ago, but not outdated. Friday Five with Dirk Vander Kooij in technology home furnishings Category 3. Vice
This vice made out of a piece of solid metal, is of course enormously heavy and rough, but super precise and always working like it’s supposed to work. Friday Five with Dirk Vander Kooij in technology home furnishings Category 4. My dog
A dog has a non-verbal communication. Looking at his eyes is communication on a different level. My chocolate (I love chocolate by the way) Labrador has hazel brown eyes with pink around his eyes. When he was a puppy he had some problems with his eyes, but the pink stayed. It gives him an adorable expression and it inspires me how these animals communicate with their eyes and ears and not verbally. Friday Five with Dirk Vander Kooij in technology home furnishings Category 5. Our pond
We have the living room at the first floor so an amazing view at the pond around our house. Always different and changing. The reflections of the sky during the day, the stars during the night. The different birds that use it, the weather that changes the water. Deep, sometimes scary black, and sometimes lovely, serene blue.






Fresh From The Dairy: Pops of Pink

I never considered myself a girly girl. I don’t really like frilly dresses or glitter but I do like pink. Pink is awesome and can go with any style—from neon to baby’s breath! Now that it’s warming up out there (hopefully the snow is over!) I am starting to embrace more springy colors and the first one that came to mind was pink! Here are some Society6 picks with pops of pink: Fresh From The Dairy: Pops of Pink Summer Triangles pillow by Her Art Fresh From The Dairy: Pops of Pink in technology home furnishings art Category Paths iPhone / Galaxy case by Patricia Zapata (OK maybe this is more than a pop, but I love it!) Fresh From The Dairy: Pops of Pink in technology home furnishings art Category Mt. Hood, North Side stretched canvas print by KaylaNewell Fresh From The Dairy: Pops of Pink in technology home furnishings art Category The Dream framed art print by Heather Goodwind In an ongoing effort to support independent artists from around the world, Design Milk is proud to partner with Society6 to offer The Design Milk Dairy, a special collection of Society6 artists’ work curated by Design Milk and our readers. Proceeds from the The Design Milk Dairy help us bring Design Milk to you every day.






Table top by MIT designers ripples when people are nearby

        <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2014/04/16/mit-media-lab-transform-table-technology-milan-2014/">
          <img src="http://static.dezeen.com/uploads/2014/04/Transform-by-Tangible-Media-Group-MIT_dezeen_4sq_1.jpg" />
        </a>
        <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/events/2014/milan-2014/"><strong>Milan 2014:</strong></a> designers from <a title="MIT archive on Dezeen" href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/MIT/">MIT</a> Media Lab's Tangible Media Group have created a shape-shifting <a title="Tables archive on Dezeen" href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/tables/">table</a> that reacts to human presence with a series of 1,000 tiny motors built into the frame (+ movie). <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2014/04/16/mit-media-lab-transform-table-technology-milan-2014/" class="more-link">(more...)</a>

Is it a Toy, a Sculpture, or a Radiator?

Is it a Toy, a Sculpture, or a Radiator? You guys, this almost looks like a riding toy for your tot, doesn’t it? But, in fact, it’s a portable electric radiator designed by Satyendra Pakhalé for Tubes Radiatori. The Kangeri Nomadic Radiator also looks like a sculptural object in your home but the energy saving device will keep you warm all winter. Is it a Toy, a Sculpture, or a Radiator? in technology home furnishings Category The internal core of the Kangeri is made up entirely of recycled aluminum that’s encased in a glossy white or glossy black aluminum shell. There’s an oak wood handle that lets you easily move the heater around on its wheels. Is it a Toy, a Sculpture, or a Radiator? in technology home furnishings Category Is it a Toy, a Sculpture, or a Radiator? in technology home furnishings Category Is it a Toy, a Sculpture, or a Radiator? in technology home furnishings Category Is it a Toy, a Sculpture, or a Radiator? in technology home furnishings Category






A Parasol that Inflates When the Sun is Shining

A Parasol that Inflates When the Sun is Shining Toer never ceases to amaze me, whether it’s designing a table that can be mailed in a simple envelope or creating a mesmerizing light sculpture that interacts with sound around it, they always push the envelope and think outside the box. Their latest? Well, they’ve designed the Cumulus Parasol, a solar powered parasol that inflates itself when the sun begins to shine. I know, mind = blown. A Parasol that Inflates When the Sun is Shining in technology home furnishings Category Located on the top of the cloud-like parasol are solar panels. When it’s sunny, the panels power a fan that inflates the cloud in about 20 seconds. When the sun fades or sets, the parasol deflates. It can also be switched off by a switch that’s integrated into the pole. A Parasol that Inflates When the Sun is Shining in technology home furnishings Category Just like a cloud in the sky, Cumulus blocks the sun when you’re outside enjoying the weather but don’t want direct sunlight hitting you. The puffy cloud is two-meters in diameter when inflated so you’ll get plenty of sun protection. A Parasol that Inflates When the Sun is Shining in technology home furnishings Category A Parasol that Inflates When the Sun is Shining in technology home furnishings Category A Parasol that Inflates When the Sun is Shining in technology home furnishings Category






3D-Printed Lamps with Color-Changing Bulbs

3D-Printed Lamps with Color-Changing Bulbs Philips is expanding their smart hue line, where they meld light, art, and intuitive technology. hue LED bulbs work with your smart device to make lighting more personal in your home. Use the app to get the perfect color of light you desire, help you wake up in the morning with a soft glow, or even throw a dance party – so many options. To go along with the hue line, they’ve added 3D-printed luminaires that allow limitless light effects from over 16 million colors, all controlled by your smartphone or tablet.
3D Printed Lamps with Color Changing Bulbs in technology home furnishings Category

STRAND + HVASS

These new lamps offer you an opportunity to create a unique and interactive lighting installation in your own home. The lights were done in collaboration with Danish designers STRAND + HVASS and German designers WertelOberfell and are available as table or pendant lamps. The pricy fixtures (approximately $4,135 for a pendant and $3,445 for a table lamp) are available in limited quantity and exclusively for pre-order.
3D Printed Lamps with Color Changing Bulbs in technology home furnishings Category

STRAND + HVASS

The STRAND + HVASS fixtures were influenced by the play of light and the shadows that are made when sunshine passes through the branches of trees. Over 3,000 sticks have been intertwined to replicate the idea.
3D Printed Lamps with Color Changing Bulbs in technology home furnishings Category

WertelOberfell

The WertelOberfell fixtures were inspired by the wonders of nature and the lamp’s shade is made up of re-imagined crustacean and insect eyes.
3D Printed Lamps with Color Changing Bulbs in technology home furnishings Category

WertelOberfell








ECAL students design interactive products that address “lack of humanness” in electronics

        <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2014/04/15/ecal-students-interactive-products-milan/">
          <img src="http://static.dezeen.com/uploads/2014/04/ECAL-Delirious-Home_Mr-Time_dezeen_8sq.jpg" />
        </a>
        <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/events/2014/milan-2014/"><strong>Milan 2014:</strong></a> a teaspoon that follows a cup around a table and a clock that mimics the actions of the person in front of it were among projects presented by students from Swiss university <a title="ECAL archive on Dezeen" href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/ecal/">ECAL</a> in Milan (+ movie). <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2014/04/15/ecal-students-interactive-products-milan/" class="more-link">(more...)</a>

Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners

Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners The 12 winners of the second Lexus Design Awards were recently announced, just in time for Milan Design Week 2014. The winners will be showing their conceptual works throughout, where curiosity was the theme, and two of them are receiving up to five million yen to cover their prototype costs. Take a look at the twelve winner’s designs: Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category 1. Iris by Sebastian Scherer, one of the prototype winners, is a glass lamp that’s made of a handblown crystal sphere. It reflects and shimmers in different colors from every angle, and is an inspiring luminary piece. Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category 2. Macian by James Fox is the second prototype winner. It’s a clever, den building kit that’s portable and is made up of a set of simple components that help the user engage in creative work within the environment. Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category 3. Crane by Magenta is a playful and interactive bookcase. Its light construction allows for lightness and movement, so that each book placed or moved creates a gentle sway in Crane. Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category 4. DICECOVER by Mansour Ourasanah is a sensor-based dice board game that invites players to learn more about our planet. It is designed to spark curiosity, stimulate playfulness, and exploration. Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category 5. E-Wheel by Phuoc Nguyen is a redesigned pedal electric cycle (pedelec), that offers riders new experiments when pedaling. It can be integrated into conventional or folding bicycles and uses wireless tech for remote control and battery charge. Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category 6. Flynote by alDith is a record player where the past meets the future. Using new technologies, it reproduces the high-quality sound that only vinyl gives. Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category 7. Game of Space by IAO Architecture is a 4D, inclusive game. It is meant to pique curiosity, and is moveable, comprehensive, and an ambiguous time-participating process. Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category 8. JoyCarpet by Meng-Ling Yang is an interactive carpet for babies to encourage mental growth and development. It uses flashing lights as both an attraction and sound reward to encourage crawling and movement. Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category 9. Ooho! by Skipping Rocks Lab is an organic membrane packaging for liquids using spherification, which is a culinary technique. It’s an alternative packaging method that’s simple, cheap, hygienic, biodegradable… and even edible! Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category 10. PAUSE by Stuti & Rajeev redefines the perception of time. It unites time-telling devices from many different eras into one playful and effective design. Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category 11. PIXIMOT by MAMIKIM & Co. is an interactive screen made up of rotating wooden cubes that simplify the surrounding environment. It forms a pixelated moving image that intrigues the viewer. Lexus Design Award 2014 Winners in technology news events home furnishings Category 12. Sky Lighthouse by Yoshiki Matsuyama is a lighting object that embodies the colors of the sky – the blue of the sky, red of the sunset, and all of the colors in between. Natural phenomena is displayed through the color scheme.






Vega Edge: A Wearable Light That Works with Any Wardrobe

Vega Edge: A Wearable Light That Works with Any Wardrobe Whether you’re a cyclist, a jogger, or just walking around your neighborhood at night, safety is key. Instead of sporting one of those ugly (no offense) orange or yellow reflecting vests, how about something that you can incorporate into your own wardrobe? Sweden-based designer Angella Mackey worked for two years with Kate Hartman and the Toronto-based Social Body Lab to create Vega Edge, a small and stylish light that easily works with whatever you’re already wearing. Vega Edge: A Wearable Light That Works with Any Wardrobe in technology style fashion Category Whether it’s nighttime and you have the Vega Edge on or it’s during the day and it’s switched off, the device looks good. It’s small enough to look like a cool accessory but effective enough to put off enough light to keep you safe at night. Vega Edge: A Wearable Light That Works with Any Wardrobe in technology style fashion Category Vega Edge is made of laser-cut leather that has a thin strip of retro-reflective fabric integrated into it, along with a circuit board that lights it up. Vega Edge: A Wearable Light That Works with Any Wardrobe in technology style fashion Category The super strong magnets let you attach it to your garment or bag in a mere seconds. Simply move it to your next outfit when you change your clothes. Vega Edge: A Wearable Light That Works with Any Wardrobe in technology style fashion Category They successfully funded their Kickstarter campaign earlier this year and will be selling the Vega Edge on their website soon. Sign up for their newsletter for updates! Vega Edge: A Wearable Light That Works with Any Wardrobe in technology style fashion Category Vega Edge: A Wearable Light That Works with Any Wardrobe in technology style fashion Category Vega Edge: A Wearable Light That Works with Any Wardrobe in technology style fashion Category Vega Edge: A Wearable Light That Works with Any Wardrobe in technology style fashion Category






Pocket-sized printer creates documents by rolling across pages

        <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2014/04/14/mini-mobile-portable-printer-zuta-labs/">
          <img src="http://static.dezeen.com/uploads/2014/04/Mini-Mobile-by-Zutalabs_dezeen_2.jpg" />
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        This teardrop shaped portable printer from Israeli studio Zuta Labs wirelessly prints documents from tablets, smartphones or desktop computers. <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2014/04/14/mini-mobile-portable-printer-zuta-labs/" class="more-link">(more...)</a>

The Depreciating Value of Form in the Age of Digital Fabrication

In this article, originally appearing on the Australian Design Review as “Tolerance and Customisation: a Question of Value“, Michael Parsons argues that the complex forms made possible by may soon be victims of their own popularity, losing their intrinsic value as they become more common and the skill required to make them decreases. The idea of tolerance in architecture has become a popular point of discussion due to the recent mainstreaming of digital fabrication. The improvements in digital fabrication methods are allowing for two major advancements: firstly, the idea of reducing the tolerance required in construction to a minimum (and ultimately zero) and secondly, mass customisation as a physical reality. Digital fabrication has made the broad-brushstroke approach to fabrication tolerance obsolete and now allows for unique elements and tolerance specific to each element. The accuracy that digital fabrication affords the designer, allows for the creation of more complex forms with greater ease and control. So far, this has had great and far reaching implications for design. Read on to find out how this ease of form-making could diminish the success of complex forms. 
The Abedian School of Architecture, Bond University, is currently installing its first robotic industrial arm, thereby joining the growing number of Australian architecture schools investing in advanced manufacturing processes. The continued mainstreaming of advanced digital fabrication processes such as, 3D printing, CNC milling, laser-cutting and robotic manufacturing in architecture schools, affords students the luxury of creating designs using these tools. Suddenly they have the freedom to explore digital design and manifest these digital designs physically, regardless of the complexity. These processes have narrowed the gap between digital representation and the physical outcome. Now students can work in a digital world of infinitely thin lines and surfaces and are still able to manufacture physical products without much consideration for the modification of the digital model to account for physical constraints and tolerance. The word ‘tolerance’ is commonly venerated as an ever-present guide to realise a design. It is seen as an acceptable level of difference between the represented ideal and the physical reality. The physical reality of a design is influenced by a vast variety of factors including, and possibly most importantly, the manufacturing process used, which accounts for the continual use of generalised tolerances. Although professionals may, on occasion, have access to digital fabrication tools, not all practitioners specifically design with digital fabrication in mind.
Students, unlike practitioners, are not restricted and as a result produce complex designs for a future we have not yet reached. Therefore, I think it is important to look at the implications that operating at zero required tolerance would have on the future of design. Complex, organic or algorithmic designs are undoubtedly evocative and captivating, but there may be a larger ethical consideration to be taken into account. As fabrication tends towards requiring zero tolerance and develops more refined abilities to manufacture complex geometry, social tolerance for complex design will most likely increase. As is the case for many new technologies, the work of the early adopters stands out as avant-garde, but by the time late adopters are using the , the work it produces has become largely accepted and sometimes even the norm. Suddenly what was a unique work one year, is homogenous the next. With increased access to digital fabrication, comes a propensity to over-use or at least to use these methods without consideration.
Let’s look at a few examples. Firstly, in computation, the use of the Voronoi Diagram has become so commonplace that it no longer demonstrates any level of skill, quite the opposite in fact. The use of the Voronoi Diagram now requires a strong rational justification because its aesthetic appeal has become devalued by overuse. Another example can be the comparison between a simple 3D-printed cube and a twisted counterpart. Both cubes require the same number of print layers and similar print time; the only real difference is aesthetic. A third example can be the use of a robotic arm to cut two lines, one dead straight and the other with non-uniform curves. A robotic arm does not know the difference between the cuts other than the fraction longer the curved line will take to cut. Once again, the only real difference is aesthetic. In the past, there was a difference in both skill of fabrication and aesthetic design; now there is simply an ever-decreasing skill in fabrication.
As the skill in achieving complex forms decreases, so does our societal value of complex formal outcomes. Maybe we need to revaluate our perception of difference, in other words our tolerance for complex design. We need to consider that what were two very different outcomes in the past are now only differentiated by one factor, aesthetics and not skill. Is a blue cube really different to a red cube, if you do not privilege aesthetics? This is where the true issue of digital design and fabrication lies. What distinguishes one work of digital fabrication from the rest? What gives the work significance now that complexity is no longer intrinsically valuable? Students should not hide behind captivating forms and instead require stronger and stronger justification for their work. As digital fabrication advances towards its goal of requiring zero tolerance, social tolerance will increase and so will society’s perception of homogeneity. Digital fabrication is devaluing itself through overuse and therefore it becomes the responsibility of the designer, and particularly design students, to reintroduce value into a design by synthesising multiple and complementary sources in a way that is unique and innovative. The challenge for students is not achieving technical or digital brilliance, but rather employing these mainstream tools to achieve architectural brilliance.