2017 Gift Guide: New Homeowners

2017 Gift Guide: New Homeowners

Either you’ve become one or you know someone that has, but mostly likely there’s someone in your life that’s become a new homeowner or moved into a new space. Whether it’s a small apartment or a massive villa, moving and furnishing said space can be overwhelming and expensive, and many things can get overlooked during the process. It’s always thoughtful and appreciated when you can take something off their to-buy list or give them something extra to simply decorate the space. Whatever the case, we searched around for 10 gift ideas for your friends and family members that might have changed addresses this year.

Ditto Throw by DittoHouse \\\ $160
Every homeowner needs a cozy throw to curl up on the sofa with and DittoHouse makes the softest ones with the greatest patterns on them. Their color combinations mixed with visually enticing patterns makes their housewares perfect for adding an

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Lasers in a Gallery: Rita McBride’s Particulates

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/lasers-gallery-rita-mcbrides-particulates/rita_mcbride_dia_chelsea_01/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://design-milk.com/images/2017/11/rita_mcbride_dia_chelsea_01-810x540.jpg" alt="Lasers in a Gallery: Rita McBride’s Particulates" /></a>
                                Sixteen high-intensity lasers cut through the misty air of a dark garage in West Chelsea. The latest work by artist <a href="http://www.ritamcbride.net/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Rita McBride</a> feels like an inter-dimensional wormhole. It&#8217;s beautiful, legitimately dangerous, and it just took Art History to a new level.
Particulates will remain on view in New York at Dia:Chelsea, a former marble-cutting facility, through June. The building looks completely shuttered – enter through the single doorway on the right with the “Danger: Laser Radiation” sign. Besides the lasers, materials are listed as “site-specific particulates, ambient extraterrestrial dust, and water molecules (which I’m pretty sure is just the coolest way to say “regular dust and mist”). I love it.

Rita McBride, Particulates

Rita McBride, Particulates (and me)

Rita McBride, Particulates (detail)

The zig-zagging fence in the room is not to be ignored: It is both legally necessary AND a separate sculpture. Titled Barriers 2017, it consists of
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Loop Installation by COS x Snarkitecture

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/loop-cos-x-snarkitecture/loop_cosxsnarkitecture_7/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://design-milk.com/images/2017/11/loop_cosxsnarkitecture_7-810x607.jpg" alt="Loop Installation by COS x Snarkitecture" /></a>
                                Loop is an installation located at the Gana Art Center in Seoul, South Korea, created in collaboration between <a href="http://cosstores.com/us/"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">COS</a> and <a href="http://www.snarkitecture.com/"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Snarkitecture</a>. The installation features four distinct metal tracks that intertwine throughout the white exhibition space. 100,000 marbles introduced one at a time per every five seconds brings the installation to life.
The marbles are formed in white glass, and proceed along 400 meters of track that is constructed in a light blue powder-coated aluminum. Co-founder of Snarkitecture Daniel Arsham states, “Our intention was to create a contemplative environment with Loop – a space that was not immediately understood upon entering. While we wanted the design to be playful, we were mindful of creating a work that provided an escape. It was important to offer a setting and feeling that were completely new and inspiring to visitors.” The COS x Snarkitecture installation is open between 10am-7pm every day at the Gana Art
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Prismverse: An Installation of Geometrical Tessellated Mirror Walls

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/prismverse-an-installation-of-geometrical-tessellated-mirror-walls/prismverse-chris-cheung-1/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://design-milk.com/images/2017/10/Prismverse-Chris-Cheung-1-810x540.jpg" alt="Prismverse: An Installation of Geometrical Tessellated Mirror Walls" /></a>
                                Artist Chris Cheung, known as <a href="https://www.instagram.com/honhim/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">honhim</a>, and his team, <a href="http://xex.com.hk/works/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">XEX</a>, created a jaw-dropping, immersive installation called <a href="http://xex.com.hk/works/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Prismverse</a> that might make you feel like you&#8217;re living inside a faceted stone. The trippy, audio/visual experience was designed for skincare brand Dr.Jart+ to delight your senses as you enter and walk through the structure that&#8217;s outfitted with walls of tessellated mirrors.
The installation was inspired by how light passes through a brilliant cut diamond and the resulting brilliance that comes through the top of it. The LED floor and the geometric shapes on the walls work in combination to provide an experience like no other, as if you were transported inside of a diamond.
            <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/design-milk/~4/qr-SzjqZ-ZI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

Jiyoun Kim’s 24 Dokkaebi Stools Are Inspired by Korean Trolls

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/jiyoun-kims-24-dokkaebi-stools-inspired-korean-trolls/dokkaebi_stool_outdoor_002/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://2.design-milk.com/images/2017/07/dokkaebi_stool_outdoor_002-810x507.jpg" alt="Jiyoun Kim’s 24 Dokkaebi Stools Are Inspired by Korean Trolls" /></a>
                                Metal cylinder seats are about the farthest thing you’d find in a park but creative director Jiyoun Kim of <a href="http://www.jiyounkim.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">JiyounKim Studio</a> has found a place for them in <a href="http://www.hangangartpark.kr/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Hangang Art Park in the city of Seoul</a> with a very fitting, fairy tale-inspired reason. The Hangang Art Park was created by the Seoul government to introduce art into ordinary parks. Four artists including Kim were asked to create installations centered on the topic of <em>suim</em> which means “resting.”
For Kim, he decided to create 24 Dokkaebi Stools. A dokkaebi is the Korean equivalent of a troll in European fairytales except that instead of wreaking havoc, a dokkaebi is a joyful spirit that rewards people for doing good deeds and punishes others for doing bad deeds. The stools are made of stainless steel that have been polished to a mirror finish with eight different colorful gradient tops inspired by the colors
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WALALA X PLAY: A Colorful, Interactive Installation by Camille Walala

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/walala-x-play-a-colorful-interactive-installation-by-camille-walala/walala-x-play-camille-walala-1/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://1.design-milk.com/images/2017/07/WALALA-X-PLAY-Camille-Walala-1-810x558.jpg" alt="WALALA X PLAY: A Colorful, Interactive Installation by Camille Walala" /></a>
                                We fell hard for the French-born <a href="http://camillewalala.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Camille Walala</a> last year after <a href="http://design-milk.com/artist-camille-walala-london/"  rel="noopener" data-wpel-link="internal">spending the day with her</a> in her adopted hometown of East London. Now, the artist/designer has created an eye-popping interactive installation, <a href="http://nowgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/walala-x-play/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">WALALA X PLAY</a>, that&#8217;s complete with her signature graphic patterns, geometric shapes, and bold colors.
Walala was invited as NOW Gallery’s 2017 Design Collaborator for their summer program and she doesn’t disappoint. She created a colorful maze that references the waterways of the Greenwich Peninsula, the curve of the Thames, and the shape and angles of the building. From above, the layout of the installation perfectly mirrors the aerial view of the location. Visitors are invited to immerse themselves within the playful labyrinth of geometries and patterns that are often broken and distorted for visual effect, and challenged to spot the differences. WALALA X PLAY is on display through September 24th, 2017 at NOW Gallery in London.

WALALA X PLAY: A Colorful, Interactive Installation by Camille Walala

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/walala-x-play-a-colorful-interactive-installation-by-camille-walala/walala-x-play-camille-walala-1/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://1.design-milk.com/images/2017/07/WALALA-X-PLAY-Camille-Walala-1-810x558.jpg" alt="WALALA X PLAY: A Colorful, Interactive Installation by Camille Walala" /></a>
                                We fell hard for the French-born <a href="http://camillewalala.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Camille Walala</a> last year after <a href="http://design-milk.com/artist-camille-walala-london/"  rel="noopener" data-wpel-link="internal">spending the day with her</a> in her adopted hometown of East London. Now, the artist/designer has created an eye-popping interactive installation, <a href="http://nowgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/walala-x-play/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">WALALA X PLAY</a>, that&#8217;s complete with her signature graphic patterns, geometric shapes, and bold colors.
Walala was invited as NOW Gallery’s 2017 Design Collaborator for their summer program and she doesn’t disappoint. She created a colorful maze that references the waterways of the Greenwich Peninsula, the curve of the Thames, and the shape and angles of the building. From above, the layout of the installation perfectly mirrors the aerial view of the location. Visitors are invited to immerse themselves within the playful labyrinth of geometries and patterns that are often broken and distorted for visual effect, and challenged to spot the differences. WALALA X PLAY is on display through September 24th, 2017 at NOW Gallery in London.

WALALA X PLAY: A Colorful, Interactive Installation by Camille Walala

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/walala-x-play-a-colorful-interactive-installation-by-camille-walala/walala-x-play-camille-walala-1/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://1.design-milk.com/images/2017/07/WALALA-X-PLAY-Camille-Walala-1-810x558.jpg" alt="WALALA X PLAY: A Colorful, Interactive Installation by Camille Walala" /></a>
                                We fell hard for the French-born <a href="http://camillewalala.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Camille Walala</a> last year after <a href="http://design-milk.com/artist-camille-walala-london/"  rel="noopener" data-wpel-link="internal">spending the day with her</a> in her adopted hometown of East London. Now, the artist/designer has created an eye-popping interactive installation, <a href="http://nowgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/walala-x-play/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">WALALA X PLAY</a>, that&#8217;s complete with her signature graphic patterns, geometric shapes, and bold colors.
Walala was invited as NOW Gallery’s 2017 Design Collaborator for their summer program and she doesn’t disappoint. She created a colorful maze that references the waterways of the Greenwich Peninsula, the curve of the Thames, and the shape and angles of the building. From above, the layout of the installation perfectly mirrors the aerial view of the location. Visitors are invited to immerse themselves within the playful labyrinth of geometries and patterns that are often broken and distorted for visual effect, and challenged to spot the differences. WALALA X PLAY is on display through September 24th, 2017 at NOW Gallery in London.

WALALA X PLAY: A Colorful, Interactive Installation by Camille Walala

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/walala-x-play-a-colorful-interactive-installation-by-camille-walala/walala-x-play-camille-walala-1/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://1.design-milk.com/images/2017/07/WALALA-X-PLAY-Camille-Walala-1-810x558.jpg" alt="WALALA X PLAY: A Colorful, Interactive Installation by Camille Walala" /></a>
                                We fell hard for the French-born <a href="http://camillewalala.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Camille Walala</a> last year after <a href="http://design-milk.com/artist-camille-walala-london/"  rel="noopener" data-wpel-link="internal">spending the day with her</a> in her adopted hometown of East London. Now, the artist/designer has created an eye-popping interactive installation, <a href="http://nowgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/walala-x-play/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">WALALA X PLAY</a>, that&#8217;s complete with her signature graphic patterns, geometric shapes, and bold colors.
Walala was invited as NOW Gallery’s 2017 Design Collaborator for their summer program and she doesn’t disappoint. She created a colorful maze that references the waterways of the Greenwich Peninsula, the curve of the Thames, and the shape and angles of the building. From above, the layout of the installation perfectly mirrors the aerial view of the location. Visitors are invited to immerse themselves within the playful labyrinth of geometries and patterns that are often broken and distorted for visual effect, and challenged to spot the differences. WALALA X PLAY is on display through September 24th, 2017 at NOW Gallery in London.

WALALA X PLAY: A Colorful, Interactive Installation by Camille Walala

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/walala-x-play-a-colorful-interactive-installation-by-camille-walala/walala-x-play-camille-walala-1/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://1.design-milk.com/images/2017/07/WALALA-X-PLAY-Camille-Walala-1-810x558.jpg" alt="WALALA X PLAY: A Colorful, Interactive Installation by Camille Walala" /></a>
                                We fell hard for the French-born <a href="http://camillewalala.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Camille Walala</a> last year after <a href="http://design-milk.com/artist-camille-walala-london/"  rel="noopener" data-wpel-link="internal">spending the day with her</a> in her adopted hometown of East London. Now, the artist/designer has created an eye-popping interactive installation, <a href="http://nowgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/walala-x-play/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">WALALA X PLAY</a>, that&#8217;s complete with her signature graphic patterns, geometric shapes, and bold colors.
Walala was invited as NOW Gallery’s 2017 Design Collaborator for their summer program and she doesn’t disappoint. She created a colorful maze that references the waterways of the Greenwich Peninsula, the curve of the Thames, and the shape and angles of the building. From above, the layout of the installation perfectly mirrors the aerial view of the location. Visitors are invited to immerse themselves within the playful labyrinth of geometries and patterns that are often broken and distorted for visual effect, and challenged to spot the differences. WALALA X PLAY is on display through September 24th, 2017 at NOW Gallery in London.

WALALA X PLAY: A Colorful, Interactive Installation by Camille Walala

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/walala-x-play-a-colorful-interactive-installation-by-camille-walala/walala-x-play-camille-walala-1/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://1.design-milk.com/images/2017/07/WALALA-X-PLAY-Camille-Walala-1-810x558.jpg" alt="WALALA X PLAY: A Colorful, Interactive Installation by Camille Walala" /></a>
                                We fell hard for the French-born <a href="http://camillewalala.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Camille Walala</a> last year after <a href="http://design-milk.com/artist-camille-walala-london/"  rel="noopener" data-wpel-link="internal">spending the day with her</a> in her adopted hometown of East London. Now, the artist/designer has created an eye-popping interactive installation, <a href="http://nowgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/walala-x-play/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">WALALA X PLAY</a>, that&#8217;s complete with her signature graphic patterns, geometric shapes, and bold colors.
Walala was invited as NOW Gallery’s 2017 Design Collaborator for their summer program and she doesn’t disappoint. She created a colorful maze that references the waterways of the Greenwich Peninsula, the curve of the Thames, and the shape and angles of the building. From above, the layout of the installation perfectly mirrors the aerial view of the location. Visitors are invited to immerse themselves within the playful labyrinth of geometries and patterns that are often broken and distorted for visual effect, and challenged to spot the differences. WALALA X PLAY is on display through September 24th, 2017 at NOW Gallery in London.

Broken Chairs and Floating Trash: 4 Mysterious Summer Artworks

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/broken-chairs-floating-trash-4-mysterious-summer-artworks/jean_blackburn_pierogi_02/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://0.design-milk.com/images/2017/07/jean_blackburn_pierogi_02-810x540.jpg" alt="Broken Chairs and Floating Trash: 4 Mysterious Summer Artworks" /></a>
                                Summer is the &#8220;off season&#8221; for the contemporary art world in New York. Galleries close on weekends and mount group exhibitions that showcase several represented artists at once, host artists from other galleries, or experiment with new talent, generally centered around a theme.
Hiding in the Lower East Side this summer are four magical artworks in two different group shows that are even more surprising with closer inspection.

Jean Blackburn, Untitled, 2014

Jean Blackburn, Untitled, 2014 (detail)

Jean Blackburn’s “Untitled 2014” stands at the center of “Double Down At Pierogi” at Pierogi Gallery. Two front-facing chairs dissolve into one another in an abstract matrix of geometry. Mashing futuristic forms with the natural patina of time, the sculpture plays between past and future, design and art. Notice that both chairs are missing a leg, each relying on the other for upright support.

Cornelia Parker, Unsettled, 2012-2013

Cornelia Parker, Unsettled, 2012-2013 (detail)

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The Mountain-Inspired RIDGE Series by Fernando Mastrangelo

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/the-mountain-inspired-ridge-series-by-fernando-mastrangelo/ridge-series-fernando-mastrangelo-1/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://3.design-milk.com/images/2017/07/Ridge-series-Fernando-Mastrangelo-1-810x635.jpg" alt="The Mountain-Inspired RIDGE Series by Fernando Mastrangelo" /></a>
                                One of our favorite pieces, and booths for that matter, at <a href="http://design-milk.com/sight-unseen-offsite-2017/" data-wpel-link="internal">Sight Unseen OFFSITE this year</a> was by <a href="https://www.fernandomastrangelo.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Fernando Mastrangelo</a>, who presented the RIDGE Series as the final release of his launches this spring. The landscape-inspired series conjures feelings of what it must be like to be high up on a mountain amongst the stillness of the landscape where nature is delicate and ever-evolving. Captured in an elevation of gradients from black to greys to white, the stone-like pieces have raw edges that extend from the ground upwards to the tops of the mountains where there&#8217;s freshly fallen snow and clouds.
The RIDGE Series features Mastrangelo’s signature cast sand pieces, here in drums and wall-mounted pieces, along with a 1,452-piece cut glass mosaic wall mirror that mimics the very same abstract mountains as the sand pieces.
            <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/design-milk/~4/YgKww9e6_oE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

Henrique Oliveira’s Devir: An Invasive Sculpture

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/henrique-oliveiras-devir-invasive-sculpture/henrique_oliveira_van_de_weghe_01/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://design-milk.com/images/2017/06/Henrique_Oliveira_Van_De_Weghe_01-810x527.jpg" alt="Henrique Oliveira&#8217;s Devir: An Invasive Sculpture" /></a>
                                Artist <a href="http://www.henriqueoliveira.com/"  rel="noopener noreferrer external" data-wpel-link="external">Henrique Oliveira</a> has been building massive organic sculptures for over a decade: The beam-morphing <a href="http://www.henriqueoliveira.com/portu/comercio_i.asp?flg_Lingua=1&amp;cod_Artista=1&amp;cod_Serie=31"  rel="noopener noreferrer external" data-wpel-link="external">“Baitogogo” in Paris in 2013</a>, and the house tumor-like <a href="http://www.henriqueoliveira.com/portu/comercio_i.asp?flg_Lingua=1&amp;cod_Artista=1&amp;cod_Serie=4" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">“Tampumes” in Brazil in 2009</a>. And FINALLY one of his sculptures has sprouted in New York City’s Upper East Side. And it’s A-MAZ-ING.

Devir (detail)

Devir (detail)

Simply put, Oliveira raises the dead. He uses plywood scraps found at construction sites to build temporary twisting organic forms that overtake rooms like beautiful monsters. This single room installation is titled “Devir” – which, as the gallery notes, “roughly translates to the concept of constant change”.

Henrique Oliveira, Devir, 2017

Visitors are encouraged to enter the sculpture (you must crouch/crawl pretty low to get in the back – I recommend it), which feels less threatening and more wondrous.

Henrique Oliveira, sketch for “Devir”, 2017

And I LOVE the address. You will NOT find this in the typical Chelsea gallery district
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