Fernando Mastrangelo Curates 2nd Exhibition of Work from Emerging Designers

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/fernando-mastrangelo-curates-2nd-exhibition-of-work-from-emerging-designers/good-company-material-culture-0/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/09/Good-Company-Material-Culture-0-810x592.jpg" alt="Fernando Mastrangelo Curates 2nd Exhibition of Work from Emerging Designers" /></a>
                                To mark the opening of his new Brooklyn studio last year, <a href="https://fernandomastrangelo.com/"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Fernando Mastrangelo</a> curated an <a href="https://fernandomastrangelo.com/collections/in-good-company/products/in-good-company"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">exhibition</a> of up-and-coming artists and designers and one year later he&#8217;s opened the second edition and it&#8217;s called <a href="https://fernandomastrangelo.com/products/in-good-company-1"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">In Good Company / Material Culture</a>. For the latest iteration, he brought on <em>Architectural Digest&#8217;s</em> senior design writer Hannah Martin to co-curate a new batch of emerging talent with works that vary greatly in form, scale, and material. The featured designers include Aaron Blendowski, Erica Sellers, Yuko Nishikawa, Brecht Gander, Ian Cochran, Dozie Kanu, Jessica Martin, Ariana Massouh, Juliana Polastri, Ryan Lauderdale, Thing Thing, Serban Ionescu, Only Love Is Real, and Dove Drury Hornbuckle, all of whose work explores post-industrial materials and techniques.

Voyager Series – Blue Spill Mirror by Aaron Blendowski

Dark Matter (left) and Kalliope I (Linus) (right) by Erica Sellers

You See A Sheep by Yuko Nishikawa

Beads Become Clouds: The Art of Liza Lou

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/beads-become-clouds-art-liza-lou/liza_lou_lehmann_maupin_17/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/09/Liza_Lou_Lehmann_Maupin_17-810x540.jpg" alt="Beads Become Clouds: The Art of Liza Lou" /></a>
                                The newest beaded sculptures by L.A. artist <a href="http://lizalou.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Liza Lou</a> are on view at <a href="https://www.lehmannmaupin.com/exhibitions/liza-lou2" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Lehmann Maupin Gallery</a> in New York this month. These may be the most intricate and mesmerizing contemporary artworks this fall… and that’s before you find out how they’re made.

Nacreous, 2018. Photo by Matthew Herrmenn

Nacreous, 2018 (detail). Photo by Matthew Herrmenn

Pyrocumulus, 2018

Pyrocumulus, 2018 (detail)

Each work is made from multiple sheets of hand-sewn white glass beads that are often painted and stained with color. From a distance, they resemble used “paint rags” or old paper towels – that get exponentially more beautiful the closer you look. My (very rough) estimate is that each 14-inch square hold around 20,000 beads. The completed works are composed of a grid of many squares, often layered 2 or 3 sheets deep.

Noctilucent, 2018 (detail)

Noctilucent, 2018

Noctilucent, 2018 (detail)

To achieve the veil-like patches, Liza smashes and
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Stine Mikkelsen’s Solid Formations Is Part Furniture, Part Sculpture

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/stine-mikkelsens-solid-formations-part-furniture-part-sculpture/aybar_solid-formations-bench_stine-mikkelsen-06/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/08/Aybar_Solid-Formations-Bench_Stine-Mikkelsen-06-810x540.jpg" alt="Stine Mikkelsen’s Solid Formations Is Part Furniture, Part Sculpture" /></a>
                                Danish designer <a href="http://www.stinemikkelsen.com/"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Stine Mikkelsen</a> was inspired by Italian geology when she designed <a href="http://www.stinemikkelsen.com/portfolio/solid-formations/"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Solid Formations</a>, a collection that blurs the line between furniture and sculpture. She developed two new composite materials that use marble and volcanic ash as the primary materials to create various sculptural objects, furniture and fixtures. The result is a collection that resembles the shapes and textures found in natural landscapes and geometric formations created by humans. Because the material or production method in Solid Formations can’t be intuitively deducted, the collection encourages us to engage in a dialogue of discovery with the objects.
This collection is exclusively represented by Aybar Gallery in Miami, Florida.
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Claustrophobic Balloons and a Multilingual Parrot: A Summer of Interactive Art

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/claustrophobic-balloons-multilingual-parrot-summer-interactive-art/martin_creed_anton_kern_01/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/08/Martin_Creed_Anton_Kern_01-810x540.jpg" alt="Claustrophobic Balloons and a Multilingual Parrot: A Summer of Interactive Art" /></a>
                                This summer, two group exhibitions in New York hide some serious surprises. The first, titled <a href="https://antonkerngallery.com/exhibitions/the_party"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">“The Party”</a>  on the 3rd floor of <a href="https://antonkerngallery.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Anton Kern Gallery</a>  in Midtown includes a gifted parrot and a room full of balloons. Even more unexpected experiences await downtown in a multi-location mini-art crawl titled <a href="https://www.oncanal.nyc/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">“ON CANAL”</a>. Here are 7 of the most unmissable experiences from those two locations right now &#8211; on view until the end of this month.

Martin Creed, Work No. 1190: Half the air in a given space, 2011

Glass doors contain a room packed full of yellow balloons on the 3rd floor of Anton Kern Gallery.  A work by artist Martin Creed titled “Half the air in a given space” is EXACTLY as the title describes – with the balloons enclosing precisely half the air in a given room.  A version of this was on view at the
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Ceramicist Eunbi Cho’s Invisible City of Clay

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/eunbi-cho-invisible-city-of-clay/eunbi-cho-5/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/07/Eunbi-Cho-5-810x551.jpg" alt="Ceramicist Eunbi Cho&#8217;s Invisible City of Clay" /></a>
                                Inside a small studio located at an armpit intersection conjoining the Los Angeles State Historic Park with one of the city&#8217;s most defiantly industrial zones, ceramicist <a href="https://www.eunbi.us/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Eunbi Cho</a> has been busy conjuring the skyline of an imaginary city. Piece by piece, the LA ceramicist has diligently composed a cityscape once only mapped by memory, inspired by a 1972 Italian novel about imaginary cities.

A quartet of examples of Cho’s “Made for Play” catalog of geometric ceramics. Cho’s sense of humor adds a colorful veneer to the serious skill required to realize forms intended to be used daily.

Cho has steadily gained the attention of ceramic lovers locally and globally for a body of work characterized by its energetic combinations of colors drawn from traditional Korean textiles intermingled with a bizarro-geometric sensibility in the same vein of Ettore Sottsass. Under the banner of “made for play”, each of Cho’s pieces operate with
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4 Stellar Artworks in NYC This Summer

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/4-stellar-artworks-nyc-summer/grant_worth_fhf_1/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/07/Grant_Worth_FHF_1-810x625.jpg" alt="4 Stellar Artworks in NYC This Summer" /></a>
                                Summer is the “off season” for the contemporary art world in New York – a time when galleries close on weekends and organize exhibitions that tend to be smaller (no <a href="https://design-milk.com/lasers-gallery-rita-mcbrides-particulates/"  rel="noopener" data-wpel-link="internal">laser-rooms</a>), but more experimental. Here are our top four picks for this summer that are 100% worth visiting on your lunch break.

Grant Worth, Season’s Premier 2018

Grant Worth, Season’s Premier 2018

Grant Worth, Season’s Premier 2018

Grant Worth’s sculptures at the Feature Hudson Foundation in the Lower East Side are technicolor rainbows of an element called Bismuth, in the form of a modified Oscar. If you’re unfamiliar with the material, check out YouTube for a demonstration on how to melt and crystalize this brittle, low melting-point metal. This is the first time I’ve seen it used in fine art, and it excels far beyond a “material gimmick”, with mysterious complexity: playing off the body, celebrity culture, and display
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Functional Sculptures Inspired by Antiquity from Sebastian Errazuriz

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/functional-sculptures-inspired-antiquity-sebastian-errazuriz/sebastian-errazuriz-2/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/06/sebastian-errazuriz-2-810x608.jpg" alt="Functional Sculptures Inspired by Antiquity from Sebastian Errazuriz" /></a>
                                Recently on display at the <a href="http://www.davidgillgallery.com/sebastianerrazuriz" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">David Gill Gallery</a> in London was <a href="http://www.meetsebastian.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Sebastian Errazuriz’s</a> first ever solo show in the UK. The exhibition titled “Anything You Destroy, We Will Rebuild” showcases Greek and Roman sculptures that have been 3D scanned, digitally manipulated, and re-casted as functional sculptures.
WATCH:
Why? Errazuriz explains:
Many of the sculptures we have learned to love and revere are broken, fragmented. Would they be as mysterious and fascinating to us if we could see them in their pristine original appearance?
Errazuriz’s experimentation utilizes technological and innovative processes in design and art, including augmented and virtual reality. Taking classical art and turning it into functional furniture might seem almost sacrilegious, which is exactly the line Errazuriz wants to explore. By taking a replica of the headless Nike (Winged Goddess) and turning it into a bookshelf, Errazuriz explores the balances of “tension and release, reverence and sacrilege, delicacy and
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Urs Fischer’s Aluminum Rhinoceros Baffles Midtown Manhattan

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/urs-fischers-aluminum-rhinoceros-baffles-midtown-manhattan/ursfischer_gagosian_01/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/06/UrsFischer_Gagosian_01-810x581.jpg" alt="Urs Fischer’s Aluminum Rhinoceros Baffles Midtown Manhattan" /></a>
                                It’s not about the rhino. That’s my conclusion after spending 30 minutes with <a href="http://www.ursfischer.com/images"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Urs Fisher&#8217;s</a> unbelievable <a href="https://www.gagosian.com/exhibitions/urs-fischer--may-15-2018" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">full-size replica</a> of a rhinoceros-turned-porcupine currently occupying a glass-encased corner of Midtown Manhattan.

Things, 2017 © Urs Fischer, photo by Stefan Altenburger

Things, 2017 © Urs Fischer, photo by Stefan Altenburger

The artwork is a 10-foot milled aluminum sculpture by Swiss-born artist Urs Fischer, eight years in the making. The rhinoceros itself is based on a 3D-scan of a real taxidermied animal, to which the artist has added 20+ random objects that morph and flail from it. Though the choice of objects is unexplained, they each seem to “show off” his perfectionism in using aluminum to mimic every possible material: the leather of a handbag, the porcelain of a toilet, patterned fabric, and my favorites: a potato-chip bag and a cardboard pizza box… all aluminum… all unbelievable.

Things (detail)

Things (detail)

Things (detail)

FILAMENTO: An Illuminated Sculpture Made from Glass by Mayice

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/filamento-illuminated-sculpture-made-glass-mayice/filamento-mayice-9/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/05/FILAMENTO-MAYICE-9-810x540.jpg" alt="FILAMENTO: An Illuminated Sculpture Made from Glass by Mayice" /></a>
                                Madrid-based <a href="http://mayicestudio.com/"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Mayice</a> have created FILAMENTO, a hanging glass sculpture that spans just over three feet (one meter). The undulating fixture displays how light travels from end to end through concave and convex glass.
Made from a single piece of glass, the fixture’s form almost disappears when lit, revealing the filament of light that beams horizontally from each end. When the light is off, it becomes a sculptural piece of art that can be used indoors or outdoors. Photos by Pablo Gomez Ogando.
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Unfinished: The Sculpture of Hugh Hayden

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/unfinished-sculpture-hugh-hayden/hughhayden_whitecolumns_13/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/05/HughHayden_WhiteColumns_13-810x540.jpg" alt="Unfinished: The Sculpture of Hugh Hayden" /></a>
                                New York-based sculptor <a href="http://hughhayden.com/"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Hugh Hayden</a> is extremely careful not to remove the “branches” on his raw material – an act that results in an explosion of form and interpretations. His <a href="https://whitecolumns.org/index.html?s=s" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">debut New York solo show</a> is on view at <a href="https://whitecolumns.org/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">White Columns</a> this month and requires a close look&#8230; carefully.

Brier Patch, 2018 (detail)

Hugh Hayden was one of the break-out stars of the Frieze Art Fair early this month, where White Columns presented his picnic table sculpture created out of fallen Manhattan trees. And now through June 2nd, just a block south of the Whitney Museum, you can see two newer works that benefit from the larger space and fewer crowds.

Brier Patch, 2018

“Brier Patch” is composed of 6 school desks that appear inseparably interwoven by their own outgrowths. Hugh notes his intention to create “visible, unifying space that is at once protective and impenetrable”. His work is absolutely a mix of oppositions: drawing you near while blocking you out, recalling
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Milan Design Week 2018: Wellness & Wonder at Wallpaper* Handmade

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/milan-design-week-2018-wellness-wonder-wallpaperhandmade/design_milk_wallpaper_handmade_10-2/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/04/Design_Milk_Wallpaper_Handmade_10-810x810.jpg" alt="Milan Design Week 2018: Wellness &#038; Wonder at Wallpaper* Handmade" /></a>
                                Embracing the trend for wellness that is sweeping the design industry, <a href="https://www.wallpaper.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Wallpaper* Handmade&#8217;s</a> theme for their annual Milan showcase of craft and making was <a href="https://www.wallpaper.com/design/wallpaper-handmade-at-mediateca-salone-del-mobile-2018"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Wellness &amp; Wonder</a> with designers briefed to create &#8216;restorative treats&#8217; that were &#8216;dedicated to balancing the beauty without and within&#8217; for exhausted visitors to Milan Design Week. The exhibition was housed within Mediateca Santa Teresa on via della Moscova in the city&#8217;s Brera district.
Australian designer David Caon created Ceremony, a reinterpretation of the traditional Japanese tea ritual accoutrements, comprising two woven recycled PET plastic rugs (with aluminum support) by Christopher Farr and a mirrored table with an interior compartment to hold ice, drinks or snacks. British design studio Pinch created a tranquil space at the back of the exhibition showcasing a wide range of products and furniture. The Sunrise Mirror by Istanbul-based design studio 15 West and Dutch furniture makers Ghyczy creates a fractured reflection to
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Milan Design Week 2018: Ventura Future

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/milan-design-week-2018-future-ventura-futura/design_milk_ventura_futura_08/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/04/Design_Milk_Ventura_Futura_08-810x810.jpg" alt="Milan Design Week 2018: Ventura Future" /></a>
                                Design Milk favorite Ventura Lambrate is no more, and this year <a href="http://www.venturaprojects.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Ventura Projects&#8217;</a> exhibitions were split across four locations, three of which made up <a href="http://www.venturaprojects.com/ventura-future-2018"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Ventura Future</a>, which we set out to explore – here are some of our favorite finds&#8230;
Triangoli is a collection of vases and vessels by Beirut-based designer david/nicolas for Editions Milano – handmade in Italy from blocks of different types of marble to create different colorways and effects. They were inspired by majestic crowns, making them at once serious and playful. On the subject of ‘playful,’ Andrea Maestri’s Ladies and Gentlemen collection is inspired by ‘the bizarre, colorful, hyper decorative world of funfairs and circus.’ This mirror is no exception and is sure to put a spring in your step before you leave the house in the morning. In response to the continuing trend for houseplants ‘Growing plants indoors’ by Dutch design workshop REM
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Milan Design Week 2018: Ventura Future

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/milan-design-week-2018-future-ventura-futura/design_milk_ventura_futura_08/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/04/Design_Milk_Ventura_Futura_08-810x810.jpg" alt="Milan Design Week 2018: Ventura Future" /></a>
                                Design Milk favorite Ventura Lambrate is no more, and this year <a href="http://www.venturaprojects.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Ventura Projects&#8217;</a> exhibitions were split across four locations, three of which made up <a href="http://www.venturaprojects.com/ventura-future-2018"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Ventura Future</a>, which we set out to explore – here are some of our favorite finds&#8230;
Triangoli is a collection of vases and vessels by Beirut-based designer david/nicolas for Editions Milano – handmade in Italy from blocks of different types of marble to create different colorways and effects. They were inspired by majestic crowns, making them at once serious and playful. On the subject of ‘playful,’ Andrea Maestri’s Ladies and Gentlemen collection is inspired by ‘the bizarre, colorful, hyper decorative world of funfairs and circus.’ This mirror is no exception and is sure to put a spring in your step before you leave the house in the morning. In response to the continuing trend for houseplants ‘Growing plants indoors’ by Dutch design workshop REM
Continue reading "Milan Design Week 2018: Ventura Future"