Counter Culture Coffee Training Center / Jane Kim Design

Architects: Jane Kim Design
Location: New York, United States
Architecture Project Team: Jane Kim, Jason Kurzweil, Alex Leonard
Year: 2013
Photographs: Alan Tansey

From the architect. The Counter Culture Coffee Training Center is dedicated to coffee education for both professional baristas and home brewers. It is the next generation in the evolution of education in specialty coffee, serving as a classroom, showroom, dining room, auditorium, and event space.In addition to training professional baristas and passionate home brewers in the fundamentals of preparing and serving coffee, the space hosts food events with guest chefs, competition training, and a professional tech service workshop.

Custom millwork derived from the different coffee-making processes were designed as workspaces throughout the training center. The welcome area features a professional, four-seat bar with one of the country’s first installations of an under-counter modular coffee brewing system from Modbar.A custom stainless drain table occupies the center of the space opposite the bleachers. The perforated surface allows the entire table to be a drain tray for ease of use by groups of people brewing pour-over coffee. It also acts as a focal point for lectures and presentations.

A wood bleacher folds up the wall opposite the drain table. The folds include several layers of seats, a table, a desk, drawers, and cabinets. A wood screen obscures the staircase which leads to the offices and storage in the cellar. Reclaimed maple factory flooring and heart pine are used throughout.

The back of the space houses a next-generation espresso training room for total immersion learning for up to 20 participants. Two U-shaped counters enable instructors to lecture and demonstrate techniques to both sides of the room. Sliding glass doors separate the space from the rest of the Training Center, allowing natural light to filter through.

COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design © Alan Tansey COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design © Alan Tansey COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design © Alan Tansey COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design © Alan Tansey COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design © Alan Tansey COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design © Alan Tansey COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design © Alan Tansey COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design © Alan Tansey COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design © Alan Tansey COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design © Alan Tansey COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design © Alan Tansey COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design Axo COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design Axo COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design Axo COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design Diagram COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design Diagram COUNTER CULTURE COFFEE TRAINING CENTER / Jane Kim Design Plan

New York City Gearing Up For New Bike Lane on Pulaski Bridge

Now that Citi Bikes are taking over the streets of New York City, the NYC Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) is getting ready to pave the way for a new bike path.  The Daily News reported that the NYCDOT plans on creating a new dedicated bike lane on the Pulaski Bridge, the connection between Greenpoint and […]

Exhibition: Isay Weinfeld at Espasso

Isay Weinfeld, the multi-award winning Brazilian architect and designer, will be opening his first ever US exhibit at Espasso in conjunction with the launch of a new monograph that takes a closer look at his recent projects.

Isay is behind some of Brazil’s most visionary buildings and this year marks his 40th year practicing architecture. Over the last few years he has designed the award-winning 360° Building, the Fasano Porto Feliz, winner of Interior Design’s award for best resort hotel, numerous retail spaces along the Rua Oscar Freire and stunning residential projects that showcase contemporary art. The A to Z exhibit is being premiered in the US at Espasso and also serves as the launch for the monograph titled .

Title: Exhibition: Isay Weinfeld at Espasso
Organizers: Espasso
From: Wed, 13 Nov 2013 
Venue: Espasso
Address: 38 North Moore Street, , NY 10013, USA

First Section of Santiago Calatrava’s PATH Station Opens in NYC

A portion of ’s $4 billion station has opened. According to NY Daily News, the Western Concourse will now relieve New Yorkers from “cramped sidewalks and temporary bridges” crossing West St. with a 600-foot underground passage lined in “bright white marble” that connects the World Trade Center to the neighboring office complex formerly known as the World Financial Center. Once complete in 2015, the controversial transit hub will double as a massive shopping and retail complex, which aims to “transform” the cultural experience of lower Manhattan. 

More images can be found here on NY Daily News. 

Heatherwick Tapped to Design $75 Million Icon for NYC

Related Companies founder Stephen Ross has commissioned designer and architect Thomas Heatherwick to design what could be, according to the Wall Street Journal, “one of the most expensive works of public art in the world.” Planned to be the centerpiece of Related’s Hudson Yards project in Manhattan’s West Side, the estimated $75 million artwork and its surrounding 4-acre public space aims to become “new icon for the city.”

Once complete, the Hudson Yards centerpiece and its neighboring Culture Shed, an expandable multi-use cultural venue designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, has the potential to “serve as a northern anchor for a new cultural corridor emerging along the West Side.” As WSJ describes, “Pedestrians would eventually be able to walk along the elevated High Line park from Hudson Yards through Chelsea’s gallery district to [Renzo Piano’s] new Whitney Museum in the Meatpacking District, opening in 2015.”

“This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to integrate a new kind of public space into the fabric of the city and to add another layer to ’s rich cultural heritage,” Heatherwick said in a statement confirming his involvement.

No design details have been released, however it is known that Heatherwick will work with landscape architect Thomas Woltz to design the 4-acre public plaza.

Reference: WSJ

Rebuild by Design> Ten Proposals for a Resilient East Coast Revealed

A year ago, Hurricane Sandy swept through the East coast—destroying thousands of homes, shutting down infrastructure, and knocking out substations—which resulted in $68 billion in damage. Yesterday, a day before the anniversary of the super storm, ten finalists in the Rebuild by Design competition  unveiled their proposals to remake a more resilient coastline. The competition—launched by Hurricane […]

Light Matters: Europe’s Leading Light Festivals

In mid autumn, when the nights get longer in the northern hemisphere, we encounter numerous light festivals. And indeed, within the last ten years, more and more light festivals have globally emerged. The reason for the success of light festivals is simple, as the German curator Bettina Pelz concludes: “It’s actually fairly easy, because whenever you do something with light in cities in the night, then people do come. If you do it good, they come twice.”

As Pelz points out, light is an apt medium for evening events, since it easily attracts people. Communities have discovered the potential of lighting for city marketing, and the closer they plan their date to Christmas, the more they merge their illumination with the festive blinking lights of commercial Christmas markets.

Join us on a tour through some of the leading light festivals in Europe. Read more about their different backgrounds, artistic concepts and future trends after the break…

The most famous light festival today, “Fête des lumières” in Lyon, is derived from a 17th century Catholic procession. However, some towns have developed their light festivals due to a strong technical history with local lighting manufacturers; for example, the city of Eindhoven with Philips and the city of Lüdenscheid with ERCO. Other cities have connected their light festivals with trade shows of the lighting industry, such as the Luminale in Frankfurt. Other festivals have started as educational events like „Light in Alingsås“. And then there are the cities that have just picked up the idea as an attractive initiative for tourism. Of course the concept and aesthetic quality varies depending on whether the tourism board, a technical team or a curator selects the artists and designers. More light is rarely better light.

For understandable reasons the tourism division looks for spectacular, colourful and dynamic projections on buildings to gain wide attention and media coverage. LUCI, or Lighting Urban Community International, an association that promotes light festivals as economical and cultural benefits for cities, states: „The overall impression is that light events and festivals have a positive effect on their host city, attracting additional visitors and generating publicity.“

Nevertheless some organisers like Lyon are aware of potential negative effects on businesses asked to switch off their lights during the festival, as they may suffer from a lower level of patronage. Another negative effect occurs when the festival projects create light pollution. To address these challenges and add quality to light installations, the role of the curator has become more important – especially with the increasing numbers of light festivals competing with each other.

I’d now like to take a closer look at four cities with different models: 1. Lyon – the capital of light festivals with a long history; 2. Frankfurt – an open lighting platform for a trade show for a financial centre; 3. Alingsås – the result of an educational event for a small town; and 4. Lüdenscheid – a curated forum for light .

The origins of the Lyon “Fête des lumières“ go back to 1643. The city was struck by plague and, as an expression of gratitude to Mary, a procession to the Basilica of Fourvière took place with lighted candles. People also light up their windows for the ceremony by placing a candle on their windowsills on 8 December.

Over time the light ceremony has developed into a professionally organised festival, which has become a benchmark for other light festivals. Numerous and impressive projects with large-scale installations, including coloured and dynamic lighting, have attracted vast numbers of tourists; the estimated average visitors per night was listed as 1.000.000, according to a 2010 report by LUCI.

The German “Luminale” in Frankfurt is a stage for lighting enthusiasts that displays everything from student projects to professional installations by famous light artists. It has been held every two years since 2002, alongside the Light+Building, the largest trade fair for lighting, and puts in the same room anyone who is anyone in the sector, from manufacturers to designers to artists. The concept focuses more on being an open platform for various light installations than being a carefully curated fine art exhibition for Frankfurt and its surrounding Rhine-Main region.

The evening programme attracted about 140.000 visitors in 2012. An intense public relations programme has contributed to its international media coverage.

The Swedish „Light in Alingsås“ event started in 2000 as an educational programme where students had the opportunity to learn about outdoor lighting from leading lighting experts.  Here the public can discover the results of a one week workshop where the teachers support the students to achieve a good aesthetic quality. The festival includes guided tours for the public, performances, as well as classes in garden and home lighting.

The light festival has become an important element for urban development as Thomas Braedikow, Managing Director for the Professional Lighting Designers’ Association, explains: „When Lights in Alingsås started in 1999 the town of Alingsås had around 20.000 inhabitants, today we count around 40.000 residents. Furthermore the structure of the inner city changed and lots of good cafés and restaurants settled during the years, with the Festival in October as their most successful month every year.”

The light event also reveals the technological transformation towards LED lighting, as Thomas Braedikow points out: “The development of technologies changed the structure and content slowly over the years, coming from incandescent light bulb to reflector halogen to LED lighting, from analogue to digital and last but not least the content broadened  from architectural lighting to telling a story. ”

In this way Alingsås has become an intriguing example of the way a light festival can naturally grow over years, from a workshop in the beginning to a sophisticated community-wide initiative that has even helped to increase the city’s population.

Click here to view the embedded video.

The small German town Lüdenscheid has a long tradition of lighting due to several local lighting manufacturers and a lighting institute.  Since 2002 the city has asked two curators to select high-quality, artistic light-based installations and interventions for their “LichtRouten” forum. The mix of large-scale projects for public squares and small installations in private rooms offers visitors the chance to encounter reinterpretations of familiar spaces and to discover less known sites in the city. By including historical light installations, the forum has also started to present and document the development of light art over time.

With a large group of local volunteers, who undergo intense training, the curators have been able to provide well-founded information for visitors via the installations and guided tours. To maintain a high technical quality, the organisers also involve the local lighting manufacturers. The LichtRouten has thus established a tight network between the municipality, companies and citizens.

Thanks to collaboration with world-renowned light artists, the curators have alsobrought an international flair to the provincial town that has attracted visitors from far beyond the region. For Bettina Pelz, curator of LichtRouten, the festival is part of a cultural mission: “People walking the LichtRouten here, many of them wouldn’t go in a normal museum. And if they go here and if they spend time with the artworks they start to deepen their visual understanding of things.“

A challenge for upcoming and new light festivals will be to find the right identity,  whether as an economically-orientated tourism event or an ambitious fine art exhibition or something in-between. With a rising awareness of the need for energy conservation, festival organisers will also need to prove the necessity of excessive light gestures or prove that luminous interventions can be realised with as little energy as possible. Bettina Pelz expects that the diversity of light festivals will also change in the next five years:  “The variety will change… I think, we will have more festivals that go further for lighting design, for art and maybe even for technology. Others will be just for city marketing reasons.”

Click here to view the embedded video.

Interested in more? Discover one of these worldwide light festivals:

Europe

Asia:

North America:

Middle East:

Australia:

Light matters, a monthly column on light and space, is written by Thomas Schielke. Based in Germany, he is fascinated by architectural lighting, works for the lighting company ERCO, has published numerous articles and co-authored the book „Light Perspectives“. For more information check www.arclighting.de or follow him @arcspaces

Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Light Marina Bay. Singapore, 2012. Image © Darren Chin Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Berliner Cathedral, Festival of lights. Berlin, 2012. Photographer: Marius Schwarz. Image Courtesy of  Festival of lights / Frank Herrmann Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Tunnel of love by Vollaerszwart. Glow 2011. Image Courtesy of GLOW Eindhoven Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Cagna Illuminations, 2012. Design: De Cagna . Light Festival Ghent. Image Courtesy of City of Ghent Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Vivid Sydney lights the Opera House. Image Courtesy of Vivid Sydney Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Vivid Sydney 2013. Image Courtesy of Vivid Sydney Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Vivid Sydney 2013. Image Courtesy of Vivid Sydney Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Vivid Sydney 2013 – Chromatic Motions light installation. Image Courtesy of Vivid Sydney Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Vivid Sydney lights the Opera House. Image Courtesy of Vivid Sydney Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Vivid Sydney opening night. Image Courtesy of Vivid Sydney Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals "Correspondances"/ Alain Benini - Fête des Lumières 2012. Image Courtesy of Ville de Lyon - Muriel Chaulet Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals "Les Chrysalides de Saint-Jean" / Damien Fontaine - Fête des Lumières 2012. Image Courtesy of Ville de Lyon - Muriel Chaulet Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals "Les Algues lumineuses" / Jean-Pierre David - Aérosculpture - Fête des Lumières 2011. Image Courtesy of Ville de Lyon - Frédéric Guignard-Perret Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Gerdsken. Lights in Alingsås, 2002. Image © Alingsås Kommun Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Tunneln S. Ringgatan. Lights in Alingsås, 2010. Image © Alingsås Kommun Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals "On dirait que" / Spectaculaires - Fête des Lumières 2008. Image Courtesy of Ville de Lyon - Muriel Chaulet Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Kulturcampus. Luminale. Frankfurt, 2012. Image Courtesy of Messe Frankfurt Exhibition / Jochen Günther Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Luminale. Frankfurt, 2012. Image Courtesy of Messe Frankfurt Exhibition / Jochen Günther Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Brandenburg Gate, Festival of lights. Berlin, 2012. Photographer: Christian Kruppa. Image Courtesy of  Festival of lights / Frank Herrmann Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Artist: Stefan Hofmann. Glow 2008. Photographer: C. Langer. Image Courtesy of GLOW Eindhoven Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Crown of Light by Ross Ashton, Robert Ziegler, John Del' Nero. LUMIERE 2011. produced by Artichoke in Durham. Image © Matthew Andrews Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Sustainable Dance Floor. Artist: Energy Floors. Glow 2012. Photographer: C. Langer. Image Courtesy of GLOW Eindhoven Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Capsule. Artist: Miriam Giessler & Hubert Sandmann. Glow 2006. Photographer: Patrick Meis. Image Courtesy of GLOW Eindhoven Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Kehrä – Disk by Fire troupe Etna. Kiasma forecourt. Lux Helsinki, 2013. Image Courtesy of Lux Helsinki Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Lux Ratikka – Tram. Lux Helsinki, 2013. Image Courtesy of Lux Helsinki Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Perspective lyrique, 2012. By 1024 Architecture. Light Festival Ghent. Image Courtesy of City of Ghent Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Encounters of a domestic nature by Amy Youngs. LichtRouten. Lüdenscheid, 2013. Image © Thomas Schielke Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Tappeto volante by Daniel Buren. Luci d'artista, Turin. Image © Archenzo, Wikipedia Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Zwölf leuchtende Vorbilder by Vollrad Kutscher. LichtRouten. Lüdenscheid, 2013. Image © Thomas Schielke Light Matters: Europe's Leading Light Festivals Strata series by Quayola. LichtRouten. Lüdenscheid, 2013. Image © Thomas Schielke

The Modern List Manhattan

Manhattan-02-by-stephen-gebhardt
[Photo by Stephen Gebhardt via The Roosevelts]

BUILD just returned from the annual R&D trip to Manhattan where we caught up on design, culture, food, and all things modern. There are a wealth of new places to share, and we were sad to see a few favorites go. While we were in town, we sat down with AvroKO and Smith-Miller Hawkinson as part of our interview series for ARCADE Magazine — stay tuned for more here. Until then, here’s some NYC hot-spots to focus your design eyes on — many more on TML Manhattan.

TML-Manhattan-map

Hotels
The new hotels staking out ground in Manhattan are some of the most design-forward spaces in the city. The Mondrian addition to SOHO by designer Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz is elegant and sexy while midtown’s Viceroy by Roman & Williams uses layers of deep, dark texture to develop an aesthetic of modern nostalgia.

Mondrian, 9 Crosby St, 212.389.1000
Mondrian-SOHO-02

gray-b Viceroy, 120 W 57th St, 212.830.8000
Viceroy-01

Brunch | Lunch
The High Line’s magnetism has brought a second Bubby’s further north, making a great brunch that much more accessible. Located smack in the middle of the most sought after neighborhood in Manhattan, Hundred Acres offers up a deliciously chic breakfast/lunch (if you can get in). But the real news is the opening of Gotham West Market, a community of culinary purveyors hand selected by the team of rock-star taste-makers at AvroKO.

 Bubby’s High Line, 73 Gansevoort, 212.206.6200
Bubby's-01

 Gotham West Market, 600 11th Ave (at 45th Street)
Gotham-West-Market-01

 Hundred Acres, 38 MacDougal St, 212.475.7500
Hundred-Acres-01

Dinner
The new dinner spots in Manhattan are incorporating a welcomed grittiness into their designs; slick whites have been traded up for patinas and the weathered interiors weave a tasty narrative. Featuring prominently on the menus this trip were oysters, raw bars, whole roasted chickens and some culinary-forward takes on ramen — all delicious.

Atera, 77 Worth St., 212.226.1444
Atera-01

Beauty & Essex, 146 Essex St, 212.614.0146
Beauty-&-Essex-01

 Chez Sardine, 183 West 10th St, 646.360.3705
Chez-Sardine-01

 Il Buco Alimentari e Vineria, 53 Great Jones St., 212.837.2622
Il-Buco-Alimentari-e-Vineria-01

Jefferies Grocery, 172 Waverly Place, 646.398.7630
Jeffrey's-Grocery-01

 The Little Owl, 90 Bedford St, 212.741.4695
The-Little-Owl-01

The NoMad, 1170 Broadway (at 28th St), 347.472.5600
The-Nomad-01

Drinks
Clandestine “Speakeasies” accessed with covert passwords via trap doors in phone booths seem to be on the decline in Manhattan. On the rise are dark, heavily wooded interiors offering bespoke drinks meticulously made by bartenders who have been teleported from the 1890s. Waxed mustaches, suspenders and other props aside, the drinks are superb.

 The Daily, 210 Elizabeth St, 212.343.7011
The-Daily-01

 The Dead Rabbit, 30 Water St, 646.422.7906
Dead-Rabbit-01

Retail Spaces
The fashion houses and design shops are flexing their muscles more than ever in NYC, with branding packages that extend from the products to the interiors and even the envelope of the buildings themselves. The less is more aesthetic is being traded in for an environment of found object as decoration, with reclaimed lumber thrown in for good measure.

 Frye Shoes, 113 Spring St. Designed by Avroko
Frye-Shoes-01

 Just Scandinavian, 161 Hudson St # 1B, 212.334.2556
Just-Scandinavian-01

Buildings
Manhattan is once again populated with tower cranes as new steel frames escalate in what seems like every neighborhood. Some of the new structures are carefully woven into the fabric as the next layer of urban infill while others are so out of proportion with their surroundings (even by New York standards) that they appear awkward and fragile.

 ONE57, 157 West 57th St, Christian de Portzamparc
NYC-02

 The Dillon, 425 W 53rd St, 212.586.5300, SMH+U, 2013
The-Dillon-01

Architectural Obituaries
Over the last couple of years, there have been many unfortunate closures of modern favorites in Manhattan. While reinvention and looking to the future are the name of the game in NYC, we’ll miss these places.

Bar 89 at 89 Mercer Street designed in 1993 by architect Gilles DePardon of Ogawa/DePardon was a watering hole in SOHO well ahead of its time and included what may have been the coolest bathrooms in NYC.
Bar-89-01

The Jil Sander Showroom at 30 Howard Street was a showroom on par with the museums of NYC.
Jil-Sander-01

And last but not least, Pintailes Pizza at 26 E 91st Street may have very well saved our lives a few times. Their thin crust capicolla be missed.
Pintailes-Pizza-01

Let us know what we missed, and cheers from Team BUILD
Manhattan-drink

Banksy Critiques One World Trade as “Shyscraper”

Banksy, the pseudonymous United Kingdom-based graffiti artist who is currently making his rounds in City, has proclaimed the One World Trade Center as the city’s “biggest eyesore.” In a brief op-ed piece, Banksy describes the SOM-designed tower as a “shy skyscraper,” one that declares New York’s “glory days” are gone.

“You really need to put up a better building in front of it right away,” stated Banksy. “… because you currently have under construction a one thousand foot tall sign that reads, New York – we lost our nerve.”

Criticism of the One World Trade isn’t new, as many leading critics have bashed its design for being “meh” - a watered-down version of Daniel Libeskind’s original proposal

Read Bansky’s full op-ed, after the break.  

Do you agree? Let us know in the comment section below. 

Dymax Redux: Crowd.Sourcing a New Map for the Buckminster Fuller Institute

The Buckminster Fuller Institute (BFI) is proud to partner with The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture of The Cooper Union and The Cooper Union Institute for Sustainable Design to exhibit DYMAX REDUX, a crowdsourcing design contest to highlight today’s graphic designers, visual artists and citizen cartographers own interpretation of Buckminster Fuller’s Dymaxion Map. Originally published 70 years ago, Fuller’s map was a cartographic breakthrough showing one island in one ocean; an iconic design that has inspired generations since.

The exhibit will feature mounted prints of all 11 finalists from the DYMAX REDUX contest, whose submissions offer a variety of beautifully original, informative and radical projections onto the Dymaxion world map. By using map as canvas these finalists explore a range of topics including deforestation, climate and atmospheric conditions, historic events, migration routes, water use, gun violence, urbanization, time zones and even lunar topography. Also exhibited will be a selection of Fuller’s own maps to provide background and context for the project.

More information can be found here.

Title: Dymax Redux: Crowd.Sourcing a New Map for the Buckminster Fuller Institute
Website: http://www.cooper.edu/events-and-exhibitions/exhibitions/dymax-reduxcrowd-sourcing-new-map-buckminster-fuller-institute
Organizers:
From: Tue, 22 Oct 2013 
Until: Wed, 27 Nov 2013 
Venue: The Cooper Union
Address: 7 East 7th Street, , NY 10003, USA

3C Competition Winners Announced

Operation Resilient Long Island (ORLI) has just announced the winners of its 3C: Comprehensive Coastal Communities ideas competition. Entrants were asked to design solutions that were not just resilient but also contextually sensitive and pragmatic to the devastating aftermath of Super-storm Sandy as well as all future natural disasters. Over 60 submissions were received from 20 different countries and 32 finalists were engaged in a public education strategy through a public voting campaign. A jury panel of eight leading professionals in the fields of architecture, urban planning and disaster mitigation met in mid-September to review the top finalists and selected 3 winners.

The 2013 winners of the 3C Competition are:

First Place: Adaptive Urban Habitats / Mixed Paper

The first place project comes from a group of recent graduates from Northeastern University. Their design is entitled “Adaptive Urban Habitats” and was envisioned for Red Hook, Brooklyn. It is a standardized kit of parts produced by local manufacturing facilities that can be deployed to infill vertically above existing neighborhoods. It would increase buildable space and density, protecting future developments from rising sea levels.

Second Place: Flexing with the Tide / Movers & Shakers

Second place was awarded to “Flexing with the Tide”, devised by a team of Pratt graduate students. Their project was designed for Canarsie and looks at a phasing diagram that calls for a managed retreat from the coastline. Pre-fabricated modules would attach to existing homes allowing for an easy transition to more resilient housing designs with minimal modifications to existing structures.

Third Place: Hard-Core / Dany Durand-Courchesne, Marc-Antoine Dufault, Olivier Lord

Third place is entitled “Hard-Core” and looks at creating housing above destroyed boardwalk sections in Rockaway, Queens. A unique urban beach aesthetic is created and the repetition of the building typology could be imagined as a new way to develop the coastline, linking more and more inhabitants together with a new shared ground plane.

Reference: 3competition.org

3C Competition Winners Announced First Place: Adaptive Urban Habitats / Mixed Paper 3C Competition Winners Announced First Place: Adaptive Urban Habitats / Mixed Paper 3C Competition Winners Announced First Place: Adaptive Urban Habitats / Mixed Paper 3C Competition Winners Announced First Place: Adaptive Urban Habitats / Mixed Paper 3C Competition Winners Announced First Place: Adaptive Urban Habitats / Mixed Paper 3C Competition Winners Announced Second Place: Flexing with the Tide / Movers & Shakers 3C Competition Winners Announced Second Place: Flexing with the Tide / Movers & Shakers 3C Competition Winners Announced Second Place: Flexing with the Tide / Movers & Shakers 3C Competition Winners Announced Second Place: Flexing with the Tide / Movers & Shakers 3C Competition Winners Announced Second Place: Flexing with the Tide / Movers & Shakers 3C Competition Winners Announced Third Place: Hard-Core / Dany Durand-Courchesne, Marc-Antoine Dufault, Olivier Lord 3C Competition Winners Announced Third Place: Hard-Core / Dany Durand-Courchesne, Marc-Antoine Dufault, Olivier Lord 3C Competition Winners Announced Third Place: Hard-Core / Dany Durand-Courchesne, Marc-Antoine Dufault, Olivier Lord 3C Competition Winners Announced Third Place: Hard-Core / Dany Durand-Courchesne, Marc-Antoine Dufault, Olivier Lord

Tod Williams and Billie Tsien Architects Design Ice Rink for NYC

After sitting derelict for years, the Kate Wollman Memorial Rink in ’s Prospect Park is poised for something of a rebirth. Tod Williams and Billie Tsien’s plans for a sports complex, known as Lakeside, is expected to restore the rink’s role as the park’s chief attraction. Michael Kimmelman recently stopped by the site to explore the project as it broke ground – click here to read his thoughts on what he calls one of the last “parting gifts of the Bloomberg era to the city.”

New York Post on Politically-Charged Public Space and Priestly Palaces

We don’t normally look to the New York Post for stories on architecture and planning. But while getting our shoes shined for tonights black tie Heritage Ball we had a chance to read the paper’s Late City Final. There in the middle of stories on JonBenet Ramsey, a lawyer “ripping a Jet Slugger,” and Lady Gaga’s thigh tattoo […]

2013 MAS Summit Revealed Big Thinking Taking Place in New York City

At the National Design Awards Ceremony at the White House on September 20, Michelle Obama confessed that Barack really wanted to be an architect—but he wasn’t talented enough. This was recounted by Henk Ovink, senior advisor to HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan, at the 4th Municipal Art Society (MAS) Summit, held October 17-18 in New York […]

White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition

Stockholm-based , along with partners ARUP and Gensler, has been announced as the winner of the two-phase “For a Resilient Rockaway” (FAR ROC) design competition in New York. Selected from a shortlist of four and an international pool of 117, White Arkitekter’s “untraditional” proposal aims to transform an 80-acre shoreline site in into a resilient and affordable community through a series of small interventions that can be tested, adjusted, or redesigned overtime during the development process.

“Our vision,” describes White Arkitekter, “is to create an urban design for the community of Arverne East that through a series of small, affordable, and smart interventions creates a model which rises beyond resilient, to a level we call ”antifragile”. The term ”resiliency” implies a return of something that was damaged to its original form. The community must not settle for a return to the past but instead adapt and actively improve conditions both for this generation and for those to come, to become beyond resilient.”

Small Means and Great Ends: The Architect’s Description

The Rockaways, with its long stretch of beachfront, has drawn visitors for many decades. The unexploited shoreline with its surrounding natural habitat has a truly authentic spirit. The area, however, has suffered from economic decline in recent years. Both public space and commercial activity are insufficient; there is a need for more services and amenities, as well as better access to the extraordinary beach. Life changed dramatically for the people in the Rockaways after the devastating effects of Hurricane Sandy. Thousands of people lost their homes. 

While it is difficult to predict if storms like Sandy will become more common in the future, scientific studies are indicating that future extreme weather events are inevitable. We need to take action to prepare for these potential natural disasters.

“We have to … not just right the wrongs of Sandy but start righting some greater wrongs, because the Rockaways have been ignored for decades.” Mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio in the Far Rockaways Sept. 29th 2013.

Great Ends

Our goal is to create an authentic urban development; a new home for the community of Arverne East, a lively and beautiful environment that interacts, rather than counteracts with the sea and responds to natural forces. The community must develop a symbiotic relationship with the environment, similar to how a surfer rides the waves. Our proposed urban strategy aims to create an inclusive community that will enable all members to flourish. It respects all citizens and provides opportunities for them to engage in decision-making processes that affect their lives directly. Our proposal accomplishes this through a design solution which integrates a healthy mix of housing types supported by commercial and public services and social places.

A series of off-shore sandbanks, a protected nature preserve, and two large storm water parks, in addition to the widened beach and dune landscape synergistically weave nature into the plan. The central boulevard lined with commercial and public functions connects Beach 44th Street Station and surrounding areas directly to the beach and the new pier. A wetland park surrounding P.S. 106 activates outdoor programming and services for children. The property types are designed to give ownership to young individuals, couples, families, and older generations. In combination with commercial and public services and activities, a vibrant development is created – impactful engagement creates successful communities.

Small Means

Our approach is untraditional; instead of delivering a one package solution we suggest the design to consist of a series of small interventions that are adaptable, feasible, affordable and smart. These interventions are a step-by-step approach to rebuilding that can be tested, adjusted, or redesigned as required during the development process.

We believe in a holistic approach to resiliency – one that provides a framework to guard against socio-economic dangers in addition to natural disasters. Our approach also aims to empower the community to capture its own creative spirit to build a new neighborhood. We will build on the existing structure to enhance its existing assets, strengthen its identity, and provide new opportunities for future development.

As the infrastructure is being developed, business opportunities will be created along the central axis of the site. As construction is taking place, we envision numerous opportunities for temporary activities to ensure a lively environment from day one.

By implementing a flexible design approach, long-term strategies will ensure successful development within the community that build on the natural assets of the shoreline and surrounding areas, as well as the innate value that the community already holds and will bring to the site as development begins. Ultimately, the end result will incorporate a rich blend of affordable housing, business opportunities for residents, new economic ownership models, and plenty of open public space.

In the event of a natural disaster, the overall development strategy is designed to reduce and control damage by dispersing and redirecting the storm water as it surges; to maintain access to and operation of essential buildings and infrastructure; to ensure a quick recovery; and to empower the community to take a leadership role before, during, and after the event.

You can download and review their entire proposal here

White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition View from Pier. Image © White Arkitekter White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition Sustainable Economic Center. Image © White Arkitekter White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition Residential Courtyard View. Image © White Arkitekter White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition Street View. Image © White Arkitekter White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition Boardwalk View. Image © White Arkitekter White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition Site Plan. Image © White Arkitekter White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition Arverne East. Image © White Arkitekter White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition Board 1. Image © White Arkitekter White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition Board 2. Image © White Arkitekter White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition Board 3. Image © White Arkitekter

LF USA by Spacesmith

Spacesmith have designed new offices for LF USA located in the Empire State Building in New York.

lf_231013_02

Description

As part of Spacesmith’s ongoing work with Li & Fung Ltd., this 100,000 sf space serves to consolidate several women’s apparel brands, as well as groups that develop clothing for large, multinational department stores. The design concept mimics a Soho loft, taking advantage of the 17 foot high ceilings located on the 5th floor of the Empire State Building.

lf_231013_01 lf_231013_02 lf_231013_03 lf_231013_04 lf_231013_05 lf_231013_06 lf_231013_07 lf_231013_08

Architect: Spacesmith

Luminous Talks: Nature and Man-Made

On November 8, Philips and Parsons The New School for Design will bring together architects, lighting designers and researchers for a symposium on the dualistic relationship between natural light and the latest electric lighting technologies, and the influence these systems have on human well being. The event is part of Luminous Talks, a programming series now in its second year, which was developed by and Parsons to inspire dialogue around relevant topics in the field. This year’s theme, Nature and Man-Made, builds on last year’s focus on human health and well being to consider the human presence amidst these forces and their psychological and physiological impact.

The event is free and open to the public, although advance registration is recommended. To learn more about the event, and upcoming webinars on the latest research in the field, please visit the Philips Lighting University website.

Title: Luminous Talks: Nature and Man-Made
Website: http://www.lighting.philips.com/main/connect/Lighting_University/luminous-talks.wpd
Organizers: Parsons The New School for Design, Philips
From: Fri, 08 Nov 2013 12:00
Until: Fri, 08 Nov 2013 18:30
Venue: Sheila C. Johnson Design Center
Address: 66 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10011,