Assemble’s Granby Workshop social enterprise in Liverpool will sell locally produced homeware

        <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2015/10/23/assembles-granby-workshop-social-enterprise-liverpool-locally-produced-homeware-assemble/">
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        Turner Prize-nominated architecture collective <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/assemble/">Assemble</a> has launched a Liverpool-based workshop selling homeware made in collaboration with local artists and craftspeople (+ slideshow). <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2015/10/23/assembles-granby-workshop-social-enterprise-liverpool-locally-produced-homeware-assemble/" class="more-link">(more&hellip;)</a>

Assemble’s Granby Workshop social enterprise in Liverpool will sell locally produced homeware

        <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2015/10/23/assembles-granby-workshop-social-enterprise-liverpool-locally-produced-homeware-assemble/">
          <img src="http://static.dezeen.com/uploads/2015/10/Granby-Workshop-Liverpool_Assemble_dezeen_sq_1.jpg" />
        </a>
        Turner Prize-nominated architecture collective <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/assemble/">Assemble</a> has launched a Liverpool-based workshop selling homeware made in collaboration with local artists and craftspeople (+ slideshow). <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2015/10/23/assembles-granby-workshop-social-enterprise-liverpool-locally-produced-homeware-assemble/" class="more-link">(more&hellip;)</a>

RIBA awards Liverpool’s Everyman Theatre the prestigious Stirling Prize

The Everyman Theatre in Liverpool, England—a cultural institution with a democratic spirit and a history of producing thespian talent—has topped the competition including Zaha Hadid and won the much sought-after 2014 Stirling Prize from the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). The new building, designed by Haworth Tompkins, a London-based firm boasting of more than a […]

Haworth Tompkins: Who Are The 2014 RIBA Stirling Prize Winners?

This year’s RIBA Stirling Prize shortlist was seen by many as the strongest in years. The practice who emerged victorious, beating off competition from internationally recognised practices including Zaha Hadid ArchitectsRenzo Piano Building WorkshopMecanooO’Donnell + Tuomey and Feilden Clegg Bradley, was Haworth Tompkins: but who exactly are they? Ellis Woodman pinned his hopes on the successful Everyman Theatre before the award was announced, uncovering the practice’s rich history in designing performance spaces through a discussion with founding partner, Steve Tompkins. For Woodman, their theatre work “has left a legacy of spaces that count among the most beautiful and provocative created in Britain over the past twenty years.”
“It is a body of work as rich in character as that of any practice working in Britain today but strongly informed by Tompkins’s wariness of lumbering his clients with architectural monuments. These buildings feel like eternal works in progress, open to reinvention from production to production, even from night to night.”

Read Woodman’s history of Haworth Tompkins in full here.
Critical Round-Up: Haworth Tompkins’ 2014 RIBA Stirling Prize Win

St John Bosco Art College / BDP

Architects: BDP
Location: Croxteth, , , Merseyside L11, UK
Architect And Landscape Architect:
Area: 11000.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: David Barbour

Main Contractor: Vinci
Structural Engineer: Alan Johnson Partnership
Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: A&B Engineering
Transport : SCP Transport
Fire : Hoare Lea
Ffe Contractor: FBS
Cost: £1043/sqm

From the architect. St John Bosco Arts College is a new build secondary 1,100 place Catholic girls’ school in Croxteth, Liverpool.
The new school is housed in a 91m x 55m three storey single span column free environment, which contains an exciting mix of learning environments and social spaces, focusing on a sculpted landscape at the heart of the school.
With a budget of just £1043/sqm the response uses a simple efficient building form which delivers 15% more area than the traditional BB98 school, allowing for greater flexibility to create both transformational and inspirational spaces.
Colour, graphics and clever internal planning to minimise circulation space and allowing for multiple functions, have created a unique response to the school’s identity and sense of place in its community.
The potentially singular large open environment is subdivided by ‘The Hill’, a central device which creates a series of spaces and scales of environment to suit different functions.
Project director Mark Braund said: “The building feels like a new breed of school, unique, contemporary and an excellent example of how small budgets don’t necessarily have to deliver standard products. The school and pupils are over the moon with it.”
St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP © David Barbour St John Bosco Art College  / BDP Diagram

Constellations Bar / H. Miller Bro

Architects: H. Miller Bro
Location: 37-39 Greenland Street, Liverpool, Merseyside L1 0BS,
Architects In Charge: Hugh Miller Furniture, Howard Miller Design Ltd.
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of H. Miller Bros.

Engineer: Paul Clark, Materian Ltd.
Landscape And Planting : Gemma Jerome
Furniture Construction : Mike Kerslake
Ground Works And Roofing : Kevin and Jimmy of Building Maintenance

From the architect. Constellations Bar is an outdoor venue which includes a bar, food truck, art space and community garden. Located in Liverpool’s up-and-coming creative quarter, The Baltic Triangle, the project occupies a disused industrial recycling yard. The project was the brainchild of Becky Pope, Nick Baskerville, and Paul Seiffert, who diverse background include community events organisation, marketing and craft beer brewing.
The project was designed and made by H.Miller Bros, collaboration between brothers Hugh and Howard Miller. Hugh is a designer and furniture maker who trained in architecture before starting Hugh Miller Furniture. Howard is an architect, previously at Hayhurst & Co in London. H.Miller Bros. was formed in order to have creative control over all aspects of a project, rekindling the Arts & Crafts ideal of gesantkunstwerk – ‘a total work of art.’ The brothers decided to move both their businesses to Liverpool in early 2013 attracted by the potential of the city’s amazing unused buildings and vibrant creative scene. H.Miller Bros. work from their design studio and furniture making workshop in a Victorian warehouse, also in The Baltic Triangle.
Approached in April 2014, the brothers were tasked with designing and making the venue to be operational by that summer. In fact, from the H.Miller Bros. Being appointment to the opening party of Constellations was a little over 3 months.
The design takes inspiration from the site; an enclosed brick courtyard created when the roof of a former warehouse burned down in the 1980’s. The remaining gables provide a backdrop to the design and these pitches are reflected as a motif in the profile of the canopy.
The canopy, along with all the other components, was prefabricated in the H. Miller Bros. workshop, and slotted together on site in 3 days. The waffle soffet was made from standard construction timber, planed down to remove rounded edges and grade markings. The undulations of the soffet create a variety of atmospheric spaces – beer hall, dining room, and intimate seating area. However these spaces are unified by the regular pattern of the ceiling.
The structure is supported by a set of ten ‘quadrapods’ – doubled A-Frame supports -made from green oak. These have a duel function, as each one incorporated bench seating or a table. These quadrapods carry the load of the canopy via glue-lam beams, which project form the roof to form a wing-shaped rainspout.
The courtyard garden is populated with green oak furniture, conceived as a set of tessellating components, and planted one-tone builders bags. These are easily movable, allowing the space to be reconfigured to accommodate the rolling program of arts events, performance, cinema screenings and a market. Constellations Bar / H. Miller Bro Courtesy of H. Miller Bros. Constellations Bar / H. Miller Bro Courtesy of H. Miller Bros. Constellations Bar / H. Miller Bro Courtesy of H. Miller Bros. Constellations Bar / H. Miller Bro Courtesy of H. Miller Bros. Constellations Bar / H. Miller Bro Courtesy of H. Miller Bros. Constellations Bar / H. Miller Bro Courtesy of H. Miller Bros. Constellations Bar / H. Miller Bro Axonometric 1 Constellations Bar / H. Miller Bro Axonometric 2

Constellations Bar by H Miller Bros is a courtyard canopy made up of triangles and zigzags

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        The zigzagging profile of this courtyard <a title="Bars archive on Dezeen" href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/bars">bar</a> in Liverpool, England, mimics the gabled roofline of the warehouses that provide its backdrop (+ slideshow). <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2014/09/19/constellations-bar-wooden-canopy-liverpool-h-miller-bros/" class="more-link">(more...)</a>

Carmelite Monastery by Austin-Smith:Lord designed to be “calm, ordered and uplifting”

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        British firm Austin-Smith:Lord used textured brick for the internal and external surfaces of this <a title="Monasteries archive on Dezeen" href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/monasteries" >monastery</a> in <a title="Liverpool archive on Dezeen" href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/liverpool">Liverpool</a> to give it an austere but coherent aesthetic (+ slideshow). <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2014/09/10/austin-smith-lord-carmelite-monastery-liverpool-brick/" class="more-link">(more...)</a>

Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins

Architects: Haworth Tompkins
Location: Hope Street, , Merseyside, UK
Area: 4,690 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Philip Vile

Interiors And Furniture Design: Haworth Tompkins with Katy Marks at citizens design bureau
Contractor: Gilbert-Ash
Project Manager: GVA Acuity
Quantity Surveyor: Gardiner & Theobald
Theatre Consultant: Charcoalblue
Structural Engineer: Alan Baxter & Associates
Service Engineer: Watermans Building Services
Cdm Coordinator: Turner and Townsend
Acoustic Engineer: Gillieron Scott Acoustic Design
Catering Consultant: Keith Winton Design
Access Consultant: Earnscliffe Davies Associates
Collaborating Artist: Antoni Malinowski
Typographer: Jake Tilson
Portrait Photographer: Dan Kenyon
Client: Liverpool and Merseyside Theatres Trust

From the architect. The Liverpool Everyman is a new theatre, won in open European competition, for an internationally regarded producing company. The scope of work includes a 400 seat adaptable auditorium, a smaller performance and development space, a large rehearsal room, public foyers, spaces, catering and bar facilities, along with supporting offices, workshops and ancillary spaces. The entire façade is a large, collaborative work of public art. The design combines thermally massive construction with a series of natural ventilation systems and low energy technical infrastructures to achieve a BREEAM Excellent rating for this complex and densely inhabited urban building.
 The Everyman holds an important place in Liverpool culture. The original theatre, converted from the 19th century Hope Hall chapel, had served the city well as a centre of creativity, conviviality and dissent (often centred in its subterranean Bistro) but by the new millennium the building was in need of complete replacement to serve a rapidly expanding production and participation programme. Haworth Tompkins’ brief was to design a technically advanced and highly adaptable new theatre that would retain the friendly, demotic accessibility of the old building, project the organisation’s values of cultural inclusion, community engagement and local creativity, and encapsulate the collective identity of the people of Liverpool. The new building occupies the same sensitive, historic city centre site in Hope Street, immediately adjacent to Liverpool’s Catholic cathedral and surrounded by 18th and 19th century listed buildings, so a balance of sensitivity and announcement in the external public realm was a significant design criterion. Another central aspect of the brief was to design an urban public building with exceptional energy efficiency both in construction and in use.
The building makes use of the complex and constrained site geometry by arranging the public spaces around a series of half levels, establishing a continuous winding promenade from street to auditorium. Foyers and catering spaces are arranged on three levels including a new Bistro, culminating in a long piano nobile foyer overlooking the street. The auditorium is an adaptable thrust stage space of 400 seats, constructed from the reclaimed bricks of Hope Hall and manifesting itself as the internal walls of the foyers. The building incorporates numerous creative workspaces, with a rehearsal room, workshops, a sound studio, a Writers’ Room overlooking the foyer, and EV1 – a special studio dedicated to the Young Everyman Playhouse education and community groups. A diverse disability group has monitored the design from the outset.
Externally, local red brick was selected for the walls and four large ventilation stacks, giving the building a distinct silhouette and meshing it into the surrounding architecture. The main west facing façade of the building is as a large-scale public work of art consisting of 105 moveable metal sunshades, each one carrying a life-sized, water-cut portrait of a contemporary Liverpool resident. Working with Liverpool photographer Dan Kenyon, the project engaged every section of the city’s community in a series of public events, so that the completed building can be read as a collective family snapshot of the population in all its diversity. Typographer and artist Jake Tilson created a special font for a new version of the iconic red ‘Everyman’ sign, whilst regular collaborating visual artist Antoni Malinowski made a large painted ceiling piece for the foyer, to complement an internal palette of brickwork, black steel, oak, reclaimed Iroko, deeply coloured plywood and pale in situ concrete.
The Everyman has been conceived from the outset as an exemplar of sustainable good practice. An earlier feasibility study had included a much larger and more expensive building on a new site, but Haworth Tompkins argued for the importance of continuity and compactness on the original site. Carefully dismantling the existing structure, all the nineteenth century bricks were salvaged for reuse as the shell of the new auditorium and recycled the timbers of the roof structure. By making efficient use of the site footprint Haworth Tompkins avoided the need to acquire a bigger site and demolish more adjoining buildings. Together with the client team they distilled the space brief into its densest and most adaptable form.
Having minimised the space and material requirement of the project, the fabric was designed to achieve a BREEAM Excellent rating, unusual for an urban theatre building. Natural ventilation for the main performance and workspaces is achieved via large roof vents and underfloor intake plenums, using thermal mass for pre-cooling, and the foyers are vented via opening screens and a large lightwell. The fully exposed concrete structure (with a high percentage of cement replacement) and reclaimed brickwork walls provide excellent thermal mass, while the orientation and fenestration design optimize solar response – the entire west façade is designed as a large screen of moveable sunshades. Offices and ancillary spaces are ventilated via opening windows.
The building has taken almost a decade of intensive teamwork to conceive, achieve consensus, fundraise, design and build, and the design will ensure a long future life of enjoyment by a diverse population of artists, audiences and staff. Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins © Philip Vile Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Site Plan Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Floor Plan Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Floor Plan Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Floor Plan Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Floor Plan Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Floor Plan Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Floor Plan Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Floor Plan Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Floor Plan Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Floor Plan Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Section Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Section Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Section Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Section Everyman Theatre / Haworth Tompkins Section

Liverpool Becomes Latest City With High Line Plans

Thanks to a group called Friends of the Flyover, Liverpool has become the latest city with aspirations to build its own High Line-style elevated parkway. The group have raised over £40,000 on the civic website Spacehive to conduct a feasibility study on the elevated Churchill Flyover, with the aim of creating a park, events space and cycle route. Liverpool Council currently has plans to demolish the flyover at a cost of £4 million – however they are said to be open to the proposal by Friends of the Flyover, who hope to show that they can deliver a better solution for around half the cost. You can read the full story on the Independent.

Haworth Tompkins’ Liverpool Everyman Theatre built with old and new bricks

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        Behind the <a title="Brick archive on Dezeen" href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/brick/">brickwork</a> exterior of the new Everyman Theatre in Liverpool, <a title="England archive on Dezeen" href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/England/">England</a>, architecture studio <a title="Haworth Tompkins archive on Dezeen" href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/Haworth-Tompkins/">Haworth Tompkins</a> designed a curved <a title="Auditoriums archive on Dezeen" href="http://www.dezeen.com/tag/auditoriums/">auditorium</a> built from 25,000 reclaimed bricks (+ slideshow). <a href="http://www.dezeen.com/2014/04/02/liverpool-everyman-theatre-haworth-tompkins-brick/" class="more-link">(more...)</a>

Open Eye Gallery / RCKa

Architects: RCKa
Location: Mann Island, , Merseyside L3, UK
Design Team: Tim Riley, Tim O’Callaghan
Area: 400.0 sqm
Photographs: Mark Reeves, Mark McNulty, Courtesy of RCKa

Contractor: W Braithwaite & Sons
Structural Engineer: Reaction Engineers
Services Engineer: Mercury Consulting Engineers

From the architect. Open Eye Gallery is a publicly funded photographic gallery located on Liverpool’s dock. The building forms part of the wider Mann Island Development, within a UNESCO world heritage site. The design balances the specific curatorial requirements with the need to create a unique, public-facing and engaging space out of a limited budget. The desire to make art more accessible to the public, led an approach which unlocked the maximum value from this prominent site, delivering an arresting building whilst also providing more gallery space than was originally envisaged.
A diverse range of gallery spaces are provided and, wherever possible, the building opens up to its surroundings to advertise the Gallery’s presence, thus engaging with passers-by and ultimately encouraging visitors. There are three internal exhibition spaces, each distinctive in character and purpose: from Gallery One’s double height space just inside the main entrance; to Gallery Three which accommodates smaller scale exhibitions from the vast photographic archive; Gallery Two is open to the city and accommodates and artists’ talks, thus animating the Eastern façade and advertising the gallery’s activities to the wider public. The threshold between the distinct Gallery Spaces is marked by dark stained oak corridors, which are both intimate and tactile.
A key feature in the design is the introduction of the Western Wall between the Gallery and the Covered Public Realm. The wall provides a stimulating canvas for installations; bringing the inside of the gallery out and directly into the public’s gaze; allowing the gallery to appropriate the Covered Public Realm as its fourth gallery space. The folding form of the wall purposefully jars with the character of the host Mann Island building and playfully moves around the line of columns in front of it. Its arresting form makes the most of the opportunity to engage with the public and creates a highly visible location for the bookshop without compromising the spatial quality of Gallery One.
The Western Wall is made of a semi-translucent Corian which gives a clean and ethereal quality. This contrasts with more tangible elements such as the untreated brass door handles and unlacquered oak reception desk which will tarnish and age with use.
The new building has given greater presence to the Open Eye Gallery increasing visitor figures from an average of 6-7,000 visitors to 53,000 visitors in its first year of opening.
Greater visibility has increased the gallery’s self-generated income through retail sales, donations and gallery hire. The increase in visitor numbers lead to a 9% increase in revenue funding from the Arts Council of England’s at a time when ACE was reigning in both capital and revenue funding nationwide. The building has therefore not only enhanced the Open Eye Gallery programme; it has also assured it’s financial future.
Open Eye Gallery / RCKa © Mark Reeves Open Eye Gallery / RCKa © Mark McNulty Open Eye Gallery / RCKa © Mark Reeves Open Eye Gallery / RCKa © Mark Reeves Open Eye Gallery / RCKa Courtesy of RCKa Open Eye Gallery / RCKa Courtesy of RCKa Open Eye Gallery / RCKa © Mark Reeves Open Eye Gallery / RCKa First Floor Plan Open Eye Gallery / RCKa Ground Floor Plan Open Eye Gallery / RCKa Site Plan