Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop

Architects: CplusC Architectural Workshop
Location: Curl Curl, NSW,
Area: 237 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Murray Fredericks

Engineer: Jack Hodgson Consultants
Builder: CplusC Architectural Workshop

From the architect. The Curl Curl House was an exercise in material, time, and cost efficiency. A specific project brief included two bedrooms with built-in robes, bathroom/laundry, an open plan dining, kitchen, living space, and a deck. The Client also required that the home was to be at one level extending from the carport and main entrance.

A shared driveway, a services easement, and a compact site influenced the form of the building envelope and allowed for the internal floor area to be maximised without sacrificing external amenity; at just under 100m² every aspect of the design has been carefully considered. The main challenge that arose from the curved form of the building was negotiating the circumference of the narrow driveway. In order to achieve the curve, plywood top and bottom plates were employed in conjunction with tightly spaced studs. The successful negotiation of this site constraint is the dark cedar curve leading to the main entrance of the dwelling.

With the existing shared driveway running past the living areas along the Eastern façade of the dwelling, visual privacy was also an important issue that needed to be addressed. Window openings along this façade were minimised, and the openings that were created had cedar screens placed over them to prevent passers-by from looking into the living areas. These screens were given a natural oil finish and create modulation in the facade by breaking up the black cedar cladding with a warmer element; they can also be easily removed for maintenance.

To compensate for having minimal openings along this façade, a sinuous skylight runs the length of the Eastern wall, allowing light to penetrate the living areas. The Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) beams forming the roof structure for the dwelling intersect the skylight on a rigorous grid, and required precise alignment with studwork to the external wall. Through careful detailing and craftsmanship, what would ordinarily be a concealed structural element has been turned into a design feature.

The Client’s specific requirement for the dwelling to be at one level informed the decision to raise the building 600mm above street level, to match the level of the carport. As a result of raising the floor structure, a generous water storage system could be installed in the sub-floor space and clean unobstructed spans in the living and private areas could be achieved. A construction system of continuous span LVL was used for both the floor and roof structure, with the roof beams being supported by a central spine unit. This spine unit performs several functions; it supports the roof beams, provides rigidity to the building and houses the service core of the home, incorporating wet areas, Living Room joinery, wardrobe space and general storage. The spine also separates the public spaces to the East from the private spaces to the West.

With a land area of 259m², a modest budget and a construction program of 24 weeks, a streamlined and efficient approach was adopted with all aspects of the design and construction process. The end result is a highly-detailed and considered building that responded to the Client’s brief, budget, seasonal climatic conditions and spatial goals.

Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop © Murray Fredericks Curl Curl Residence / CplusC Architectural Workshop Floor Plan

House Refurbishment in Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos

Architects: terceroderecha arquitectos
Location: Silleda, Pontevedra,
Arquitecto A Cargo: Jorge Álvarez Rúa, Laura Arias Pardo, Jose C. Álvarez Rodríguez
Area: 215 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Baku Akazawa

From the architect. Integrating a single-family house on an urban housing estate, while fulfilling today’s functional needs calls for a considerable effort involving the lay-out, the structure and the facilities. Bearing that in mind, the project takes an analysis of the current situation as its starting point, assessing its value as an asset which gives the building its character. The aim is to integrate the project into the surrounding site, rather than dominating or imposing on it.

Based on the surrounding environment, we propose a free and unique interpretation of the present and the past, striking an imaginative balance between bygone days and modern times. The personality of the existing buildings is maintained, clearly distinguishing the old from the new by means of a markedly contemporary construction.

The main element of the house is the inner courtyard. Our proposal revolves around reviving the idea of using this area as the central element which the whole of the house functions around. Therefore, the proposal involves building two abstract volumes which respect external alignments but open inwards, recalling the central area’s original character, unifying the whole.

In this way, the structure of the house is organized in a way such that all the rooms open onto the central area, ensuring the necessary privacy whilst at the same time opening up onto the outer space. Sunlight is also a key factor when organizing the house. Therefore, since the windows opening onto the yard all face north, a large window placed on the main façade bathes the living area with light from the south. The final building combines functionality with a balance between comfort, sustainability and energy efficiency.

Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos © Baku Akazawa Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos © Baku Akazawa Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos © Baku Akazawa Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos © Baku Akazawa Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos © Baku Akazawa Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos © Baku Akazawa Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos Original Situation Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos Original Situation Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos © Baku Akazawa Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos © Baku Akazawa Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos © Baku Akazawa Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos © Baku Akazawa Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos © Baku Akazawa Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos Plan Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos Plan Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos Section Casa en Silleda / terceroderecha arquitectos Model

Midvale Courtyard House / Bruns Architecture

Architects: Bruns Architecture
Location: , Wisconsin, United States
Interior Design: MANI & Company
Year: 2013
Photographs: Tricia Shay

From the architect. Balancing the introverted nature of a courtyard with the bold personality of an extrovert all while managing matters of privacy, this renovation builds on its solid mid-century roots. Located on a busy boulevard in the state’s capital, the 1,685 sf half-century old ranch home was confined and uninviting, leaving its spaces dark and disconnected from the site. The renovation and 840 sf addition of Midvale Courtyard House adds a proper entry, elevated master suite, and covered parking, but also pierces and stretches the solid forms to create connection between indoor and outdoor spaces.

Set back on its lot, the house is buffered from the busy street traffic. But the adjacent neighbors are closely spaced, challenging the notion of opening the interior to light and views. By creating a series of private outdoor rooms, the interior spaces visually extend beyond their original boundaries. As a result, the plan becomes a collection of independent wings each with a heightened focus on their unique programmatic requirements. Taller ceiling heights are created in the public living wing by affixing the new second floor above the original ceiling height, allowing light to penetrate deeper into the main level.

One’s experience is choreographed through a sequence of private courtyards and interior zones. A series of site walls with varying levels of opacity organize pathways, linking the exterior rooms and providing access throughout the plan. Composed with its own courtyard, the new entry and vertical circulation component reorients the house’s façade while integrating the new motor court with the main structure. The geometry of the new entry is extruded into the main form to organize the kitchen on the first floor and master bath on the second floor. On the main level, the wood floor transforms into the ceiling surface. And in the master bath an exotic wood ribbon folds up and over itself, defining a spa-like wet zone. Sitting above the neighboring houses, the new master suite includes a private courtyard terrace. A partial height privacy wall creates intimacy while masking the adjacent rooftops, leaving only views to the mature tree canopies beyond.

The building’s envelope is upgraded with new insulation and roof assemblies. Energy efficient mechanical systems replace outdated infrastructure. The new insulated, low-e glazed fenestration naturally illuminates interior spaces, and all supplemental lighting is upgraded with energy efficient fixtures and lamps.

Midvale Courtyard House / Bruns Architecture © Tricia Shay Midvale Courtyard House / Bruns Architecture © Tricia Shay Midvale Courtyard House / Bruns Architecture © Tricia Shay Midvale Courtyard House / Bruns Architecture © Tricia Shay Midvale Courtyard House / Bruns Architecture © Tricia Shay Midvale Courtyard House / Bruns Architecture © Tricia Shay Midvale Courtyard House / Bruns Architecture © Tricia Shay Midvale Courtyard House / Bruns Architecture © Tricia Shay Midvale Courtyard House / Bruns Architecture © Tricia Shay Midvale Courtyard House / Bruns Architecture Diagram Midvale Courtyard House / Bruns Architecture Diagram Midvale Courtyard House / Bruns Architecture Plan

House Re / SoNo Arhitekti

Architects: SoNo Arhitekti
Location: ,
Architect In Charge: Edvard Blažko, Marko Volk
Area: 307.9 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Matevž Paternoster

From the architect. House RE was very much affected by the demanding local conditions that represented a major challenge for the designing team. Main concept is the ever-changing volume of inner space that is strongly influenced by the surrounding area’s diversity. The boldly designed facade is a combination of dark color shades and natural larch wood’s textures.

Open floor design meets the needs of this young family’s modern life and ensures comfort and quality. Living room overlooks the forest through the paneled glass wall that encloses the external roofed atrium which provides a direct contact to its natural surroundings. Children’s rooms are located in the attic while the main bedroom is located in the south part of the ground floor level with a necessary degree of privacy for the parents. The basement is attended for parking and technical areas.

House Re / SoNo Arhitekti © Matevž Paternoster House Re / SoNo Arhitekti © Matevž Paternoster House Re / SoNo Arhitekti © Matevž Paternoster House Re / SoNo Arhitekti © Matevž Paternoster House Re / SoNo Arhitekti © Matevž Paternoster House Re / SoNo Arhitekti © Matevž Paternoster House Re / SoNo Arhitekti © Matevž Paternoster House Re / SoNo Arhitekti © Matevž Paternoster House Re / SoNo Arhitekti © Matevž Paternoster House Re / SoNo Arhitekti © Matevž Paternoster House Re / SoNo Arhitekti Ground Floor Plan House Re / SoNo Arhitekti Basement Floor Plan House Re / SoNo Arhitekti Attic Floor Plan House Re / SoNo Arhitekti Site Plan House Re / SoNo Arhitekti Section House Re / SoNo Arhitekti Section

Raven Street House / James Russell Architect

Architects: James Russell Architect
Location: , QLD, Australia
Design Team: James Russell & Andrew Schindler
Builder: James Russell, Andrew Schindler & Peter Harding
Engineering: Adrian Dine, ad.structure
Joiner: William McMahon Cabinetmaker
Area: 197.0 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Toby Scott

From the architect. There is a boat from my childhood, “Makaira”, that inspires many of my projects. In that boat, I felt cradled, protected, but if I chose, I could open up to and be aware of the broader context around me. Three or four of these boats would raft together, each one acting as a room with a space in between. We would enjoy meals on one boat, cards or sleep on another and play in the water or wrecks nearby. We learnt from each other and moved in smaller but breathable spaces. As a structure, what a beautiful work in timber!

Raven Street House is an alteration and addition to a traditional workers cottage in the inner Brisbane suburb of West End. Like Makaira, it is protective of the owner’s young family and artwork but creates a greater awareness of country surrounding the structure. At the Raven Street House, the new structure plays with timber tradition respectfully but it reworks the dark Victorian core.

The workers cottage opens to the street as gallery and workspace while domestic life is within the new structure behind and under. The site slopes gently to the rear, allowing the addition to take advantage of the space provided by the undercroft of the existing cottage. A frame and floor of ironbark and compact laminate makes the verandahs on which they live. H shaped columns take cladding of timber, coloured and textured glass and curtains.

Coloured and textured glass reminiscent of traditional housing in the area lines east and west boundaries. The walls glow at dawn and dusk, filter views and manage air movement. Ironbark flooring is the ceiling below, the undercroft. Slatted edges allow rain and water from bathing to fall through. Awnings protect the sleepout from south-western storms and winter winds. North and east sun penetrates deep into the plan through courtyards and a glass-roofed void within the workers cottage.

Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Raven Street House / James Russell Architect Upper Floor Plan Raven Street House / James Russell Architect Lower Floor Plan

Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal”

From the architect. Placing second overall, just a few points behind the winning 2013 Solar Decathlon team, students from the University of Las Vegas (Team Las Vegas) have won the “Market Appeal” contest at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) sixth solar-home competition. Known as “DesertSol”, the project was lauded for its “livability, marketability and constructability” as well as its “appeal within the housing market of the target client chosen by team.” It is designed to be a self-reliant, energy-efficient second home for upper-middle income Americans who pursue active lifestyles in the sparsely populated Mojave Desert. Read on for the team’s project description.

DesertSol takes advantage of the Mojave Desert’s renewable resources to produce a sustainable home that is self-reliant in the severe desert climate. Its unique name was derived directly from the team’s goals for the project, which provides “solutions to sustainable desert living” by harnessing “solar energy as the home’s primary fuel source” and embodying the “soul” of the Mojave Desert.

The home is clad in pre-weathered materials that are capable of enduring the harsh desert environment. Structurally, non-traditional framing techniques are used to reduce the usage of certain materials and create a more efficient thermal envelope. In addition to this, a number of energy-saving features have been made to ensure the home will achieve LEED Platinum status. These features include:

  • Passive design techniques and a tightly constructed envelope to decrease the energy load.
  • State-of-the-art photovoltaic solar panels with high efficiency micro-inverters, controlled individually to offer maximum power point tracking.
  • Ductless heat pump system that eliminates energy losses typically found in a traditional central forced air duct system.
  • An energy recovery ventilation system which recovers 70%-80% of the energy in outgoing air and transfers it to the incoming fresh air.
  • LED lighting, which significantly reduces the power needed for the lighting systems.

In terms of proper water management, DesertSol collects rainwater and moisture and reuses it for evaporative cooling as well as irrigation for landscaping. The home also utilizes clean water and it’s extremely useful thermal properties (water transfers heat approximately 20 times more efficiently than air!) in a unique way. Hydronic radiant floor heating system is among the most cost-effective and efficient type of heating systems available.

A host of new technologies are used to give DesertSol’s residents an exciting amount of control over their environment. To complement efficient lighting, the home automation system can be used to dim, turn off, and turn on the lighting, even when the occupants are not home. The same level of control is had over the HVAC systems as well. By becoming more familiar with how energy in used, both in terms of real-time as well as historical usage, residents may even be encouraged to save energy.

Learn more about DesertSol here on the Team Las Vegas’ website.

Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © DesertSol - Solar Decathlon Team Las Vegas Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © DesertSol - Solar Decathlon Team Las Vegas Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © DesertSol - Solar Decathlon Team Las Vegas Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © DesertSol - Solar Decathlon Team Las Vegas Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © DesertSol - Solar Decathlon Team Las Vegas Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © DesertSol - Solar Decathlon Team Las Vegas Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © DesertSol - Solar Decathlon Team Las Vegas Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © DesertSol - Solar Decathlon Team Las Vegas Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © DesertSol - Solar Decathlon Team Las Vegas Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © DesertSol - Solar Decathlon Team Las Vegas Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Las Vegas Places Second, Wins “Market Appeal” © DesertSol - Solar Decathlon Team Las Vegas

Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects

Architects: Office Twentyfive Architects
Location: Gerakas,
Area: 360.0 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Matheus Kleanthis

From the architect. The House is located in a suburb of Athens city, called Gerakas. It is surrounded by  other private residences with gardens, narrow plots and unformed public spaces, which in the future will become parks and green zone areas. Due to the narrow and deep shape of the site and with an exclusive view to a park at the front side, we decided the volume of housing to reach the two adjacent sites.

Basic principle at the architecture of the residence which created its final form was the capture of functional development in the shell. 

The white color of the dominant volume is combined with an antiquated wood of cedar ,which covers the facade of the 1st floor surface, and paneled clean glass surfaces which surround the site. The modern design of the building is combined with similar choices at the interior decoration. 

At the ground floor there is the living room, the kitchen and the dining room, but also a wine cellar and parking spaces.  The fireplace in tones of grey dominates the living room, while upstairs the respectively selected tints in wallpapers and lightings offer tranquility in the family. To take advantage of the view to the park, we organized the living room at the front part of the ground floor and the kitchen at the back, with direct contact to a private garden.

A curved wall at the left edge of the site leads the visitor gradually towards the entrance of the residence. At the center of the house there is an internal patio, which goes through all the floor levels and diffuses natural light in the residence. With the creation of this internal patio we provide, natural light and cooling in the house and also create a beautiful internal garden in the residence.

The 1st floor was developed as one volume throughout the width of the site, taking advantage of the view towards the park from all bedrooms. Furthermore, as cantilever  it shelters the entrance of the residence. This level hosts a private family living room and the private spaces of the bedrooms and the bathrooms.

Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects © Matheus Kleanthis Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects First Floor Plan Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects Ground Floor Plan Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects Basament Floor Plan Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects Elevation Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects Elevation Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects Section Family House / Office Twentyfive Architects Section

CAP House / Estudio MMX

Architects: Estudio MMX
Location: City, Federal District,
Project Architects: Jorge Arvizu, Ignacio Del Rio, Emmanuel Ramirez, Diego Ricalde
Design Team: Javier Moctezuma, Erendira Tranquilino
Area: 240 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Yoshihiro Koitani

From the architect. Located in a residential neighborhood at the west of Mexico City, the house responds to a fragmented urban environment where the volumetric configuration of the buildings creates an uneven landscape of colors and volumes.

The proposal adopts the logic of its context, and applies it within the plot by subdividing the program into its diverse parts. Each space takes shape as a response to the specific needs of the program and gets added onto a larger cluster of articulated volumes.

Thus, the formal manifestation of the idea gets away from the more traditional operation of subdividing a larger envelope and instead, works with a logic of adding units of varying characteristics to create an ensemble rather than a standalone piece. This project explores the idea of the room as the basic unit of the house. The dwelling should not be the result of fragmenting a larger envelope, on the contrary, it should be the outcome of adding multiple rooms, each one with its own scale, proportions and identity.

The scale of each room and the openings of the volumes are determined by the needs of the interior spaces, thus they manifest through the façade as a relaxed and non-committed gesture. Nodes of vertical movement, courtyards and gardens create a balance within the sequential progression of rooms across the site.

The geometric outcome of this operation creates an articulated pattern of interlocked volumes and voids that complement one another within the scheme.

Casa CAP / Estudio MMX © Yoshihiro Koitani Casa CAP / Estudio MMX © Yoshihiro Koitani Casa CAP / Estudio MMX © Yoshihiro Koitani Casa CAP / Estudio MMX © Yoshihiro Koitani Casa CAP / Estudio MMX © Yoshihiro Koitani Casa CAP / Estudio MMX © Yoshihiro Koitani Casa CAP / Estudio MMX © Yoshihiro Koitani Casa CAP / Estudio MMX © Yoshihiro Koitani Casa CAP / Estudio MMX © Yoshihiro Koitani Casa CAP / Estudio MMX © Yoshihiro Koitani Casa CAP / Estudio MMX © Yoshihiro Koitani Casa CAP / Estudio MMX © Yoshihiro Koitani Casa CAP / Estudio MMX © Yoshihiro Koitani Casa CAP / Estudio MMX Modelo Casa CAP / Estudio MMX Modelo Casa CAP / Estudio MMX Planta Casa CAP / Estudio MMX Planta Casa CAP / Estudio MMX Planta Casa CAP / Estudio MMX Corte Casa CAP / Estudio MMX Corte Casa CAP / Estudio MMX Cortes

Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa

Architects: Bunzo Ogawa
Location: Hiroshima, Hiroshima Prefecture,
Structures: Takashi Fujiki, Satoshi Horie
Area: 64.46 sqm
Year: 2009
Photographs: Toshiyuki Yano

From the architect. ‘WRAP HOUSE’ is grouping and wrapping the three elements sunlight, spacious sense and privacy to enrich the living space. The site is located in a flat residential quarter in the Southwest of Hiroshima City. As the site is from all sides surrounded by houses, one of which is directly bordering the site boundary, it was necessary to come up with the following architectural arrangement.

To create a bright and wide space while protecting one’s privacy despite the site’s restrictions, a wall wraps around the full site creating a ‘void’ on the north side while respecting the permitted floor area ratio. The north orientated living space is extended by a terrace, which is located adjacent to the parking space while facing the street to the north. In addition, considering the natural sunlight conditions for the neighboring house to the west, a pitched roof was chosen and a v-shaped wall is surrounding the ‘void’ on the east side. As a result, sunlight shines into the void in the morning and a ‘sunlight well’ is created. The collected sunlight is reflected by a white wall, and illuminates the room gently. In the early morning, sunlight enters the void from the east. As the sun rises further it shines through the upper window, and when the sun begins to decline light falls through the skylights.

Thus, as the way the light enters constantly changes from sunrise to sunset, the space changes with the flow of time. When the night comes, the diagonally cut wall appears while the scenery around it disappears. A space different to the daytime emerges. The external void space is perceived as an extension of the internal space, while the wrap-around wall is both protecting the privacy of the residence space against the surroundings and creating a spacious impression. The sky can be seen from the bathroom on first floor, while the car can be overlooked from the master bedroom.

The entrance for both residents and car is facing the road to the north and is formed by a part of the wall which can be opened and shut providing access to the void space. The sky framed by a diagonal wall extends to the top and an ash tree with a height of 6m penetrates the second floor terrace. This north side buffer zone, although not included in the legal building footprint, plays a role in maximizing the site’s potential.

Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa © Toshiyuki Yano Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa First Floor Plan Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa Second Floor Plan Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa Site Plan Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa Section Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa Section Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa North Elevation Wrap House / Bunzo Ogawa East Elevation

Albizia House / Metropole Architects

Architects: Metropole Architects
Location: , South Africa
Design Architect: Nigel Tarboton
Project Architect: Tyrone Reardon
Project Technician: Chris Laird
Area: 1000.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Grant Pitcher

Structural Engineers: Young & Satharia
Design Engineer: Rob Young
Structural Technician: Terry Schubach
Interior Designers: Union 3
Main Contractor: East Coast Construction
Principal: Justin Rosewarne
Project Manager : Benno Terblanche
Site Foreman: Tony Moodley

From the architect. We were commissioned to design a contemporary family home on a one acre site, situated at the end of a spur, in Simbithi Eco-Estate. The client’s brief called for a home with an overriding sense of simplicity but with a high degree of sophistication.

All the living areas and bedroom suites face onto a panoramic vista, which includes a dense forest down-slope from the house.

The palette of natural materials including timber screens, decking and cladding, off-shutter concrete and stone cladding juxtapose with the aggressive architectural form making, creating a home that is not only visually and spatially exciting, but also comfortable and intimate.

The extensive use of water in the design of the home includes a 25 metre lap pool with a glass panel between the water and the basement cinema room, and a shallow but expansive reflective pond on the approach side, which mirrors the building day and night, and evokes a sense of tranquility.

The architectural style of the home is heavily influenced by the ‘Googie’ architecture of the American architect John Lautner. The origin of the name ‘Googie’ dates to 1949, when architect John Lautner designed the West Hollywood coffee shop, ‘Googies’, which had distinct architectural characteristics.

‘Googie’ architecture is a form of modern architecture and a subdivision of futurist architecture with stylistic conventions influenced by, and representing 50’s American society’s fascination and marketing emphasis on futuristic design, car culture, jets, the Space Age, and the Atomic Age.

‘Googie’ was also characterized by design forms symbolic of motion, including upswept roofs, curvaceous geometric shapes, and the bold use of glass, steel and neon, the spirit of which is embodied in Albizia House.

Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects © Grant Pitcher Albizia House / Metropole Architects Site Plan Albizia House / Metropole Architects Plan Albizia House / Metropole Architects Plan Albizia House / Metropole Architects Plan Albizia House / Metropole Architects Plan Albizia House / Metropole Architects Elevation Albizia House / Metropole Architects Elevation Albizia House / Metropole Architects Elevation Albizia House / Metropole Architects Elevation Albizia House / Metropole Architects Section Albizia House / Metropole Architects Section

House Rehabilitation / BAST

Architects: BAST
Location: Toulouse, France
Area: 120.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of

From the architect. In the landscapes of Toulouse´s suburbs, this construction reinterprets the characteristic typology of the streets in Brickyard. In contrast to the conserved masonry base texture that is deliberately highlighted by a limewash, the new construction, made entirely of a lightweight metal frame structure, tends towards abstraction.

The new gear is deformed in order to enjoy the interior lightened by the northern sun. Part of the history of this street, this whole existing masonry base with the new metal top construction is changing the types of living to the current issues of urban renewal and adaptation of old buildings to new ways of living.

House Rehabilitation / BAST Courtesy of BAST House Rehabilitation / BAST Courtesy of BAST House Rehabilitation / BAST Courtesy of BAST House Rehabilitation / BAST Courtesy of BAST House Rehabilitation / BAST Courtesy of BAST House Rehabilitation / BAST Courtesy of BAST House Rehabilitation / BAST Courtesy of BAST House Rehabilitation / BAST Courtesy of BAST House Rehabilitation / BAST Axonometric House Rehabilitation / BAST Axonometric House Rehabilitation / BAST Axonometric House Rehabilitation / BAST Axonometric House Rehabilitation / BAST Axonometric

Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects

Architects: SHARE Architects
Location: Vienna, Austria
Project Team: M. Bambuch
Structural Engineer: Buschina & Partner ZT GmbH
Area: 45.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Kurt Kuball

From the architect. The bathing hut was conceived as a micro villa with full amenities. Located on the waterfront of the Old Danube, but still in the centre of Vienna(Austria), it is a private chill-out oasis within an otherwise dense urban context.

Coming from the street, the property is accessed through a large sliding gate that leads to the top terrace of the very compact arrangement. An open-air staircase along the side facade takes the visitor 3 meters below.

On this level the main terrace open to the Old Danube, and the double-height, main living room can seamlessly connect to the outdoor space through a sliding facade. Inside, a suspended gallery offering wonderful views over the water is used as a sleeping deck.

Under the gallery there is place for the bathroom and the adjacent open kitchen. In the rear of the house under the overlying top terrace place was found for a storage. A wooden floating deck, illuminated at night, offers the possibility of a boat mooring.

Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects © Kurt Kuball Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects © Kurt Kuball Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects © Kurt Kuball Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects © Kurt Kuball Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects © Kurt Kuball Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects © Kurt Kuball Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects © Kurt Kuball Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects © Kurt Kuball Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects © Kurt Kuball Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects Site Plan Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects South Elevation Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects West Elevation Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects East Elevation Bathing Hut / SHARE Architects Cross Section

Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors

A team of Austrian students from Vienna University of Technology (Team ) has has won top honors for “designing, building, and operating the most cost-effective, energy-efficient and attractive solar-powered house” at the 2013 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Decathlon. The net-positive home, known as “LISI – Living inspired by sustainable innovation,” prides itself for being a simple, smart house that is capable of adapting to a variety of lifestyles and climate zones.

Prior to being crowned as winner, LISI competed against eighteen other student-built, solar-powered homes over the course of ten days in Irvine, California. This was the first time an Austrian university has participated in the U.S. Solar Decathlon. Learn more about the winning design by reading the team’s project description after the break.

Over the course of three semesters an interdisciplinary group of students from the Vienna University of Technology developed a variety of concepts regarding floor plan layout, interior design, as well as facade systems with a primary goal to design a compact, affordable and energy efficient home for different users and sites. The result is LISI, an “energy+ atrium house” for two individuals that is completely powered by self-produced solar energy.

Due to the delivery of the building in several standard shipping containers, LISI is designed as a pre-fabricated modular wooden frame construction that allows quick and simple assembly and disassembly.

This simple plan consists of three zones: service core, living area and adjacent patios, which may be enclosed using a flexible facade. A ramp, enveloped by a textile facade, leads users first onto the northern patio and then into a 60 square meter central living area which can be extended by the north and south patios by fully opening the large-scaled glass sliding elements. Inside and directly east of the living space is the service core, housing a bathroom, bedroom and all the essential technical equipment to control the smart home. Depending on the climatic or social needs of the residents different textile shading elements help LISI to close or open up to the surrounding area.

The plus-energy home generates all required energy from a roof-mounted PV array. The supply of cold and hot water for space heating, cooling and for domestic hot water relies on two air-water heat pumps. Comfortable air conditions are provided by an ERV unit, which acts as a heat and humidity exchanger between used exhausted air and fresh intake air. A functional floor system regulates the entire buildings climate using water, air, and active cubic capacity. It efficiently provides heating, cooling, and fresh air to create a consistently comfortable indoor climate. In addition, an innovative shower tray recovers thermal energy from drain water through a heat exchanger, significantly reducing the net energy consumption needed for daily hygiene.

The synergy of modular timber lightweight construction, the use of eco-friendly materials and renewable energies, plus sophisticated home automation creates a sustainable and affordable high-quality housing project adaptable for different needs of users and sites.

University of Nevada Las Vegas took second place, followed by Czech Republic, comprised of students from Czech Technical University, in third place. Stay tuned for more information.

More about LISI can be found on the team’s website here

Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors ©  LISI - Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors ©  LISI - Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors ©  LISI - Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors ©  LISI - Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors ©  LISI - Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors ©  LISI - Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors ©  LISI - Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Bokeh Design presented by Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Bokeh Design presented by Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Bokeh Design presented by Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Bokeh Design presented by Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Bokeh Design presented by Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Bokeh Design presented by Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors © Bokeh Design presented by Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors [1] North Patio [2] Living Space [3] South Patio [4] Mechanical Room [5] Bathroom [6] Bedroom. Image Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors ©  LISI - Solar Decathlon Team Austria Solar Decathlon 2013: Team Austria Wins Top Honors ©  LISI - Solar Decathlon Team Austria

Zeta House / 29 design

Architects: 29 design
Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Project Team: Amanda Teh, Stephanie Maignan
Year: 2012
Photographs: H. Lin Ho

From the architect. The Zeta House is situated in the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur and sits on a relatively large 40,000sf plot of land. Adjacent to the lot is a communal park, which visually extends the green area and makes It appear boundless. We took this expansion of space as our design directive which dominates the orientation and character of all major spaces.

The Client Is a family of 4, two of whom are grown children living at home. In tackling the relatively large design brief of 11,000 sqft, we “massaged” the program into three pavilions; a main double storey pavilion which contains the majority of the program; a 1.5 storey pavilion which features a 2.7m overhang and contains an informal lounge, family library, gym and guest suite, linked to the main pavilion by a glassed in bridge, and finally a freestanding open air pavilion for bbq and other outdoor activities.

The ground floor of the house is mostly glass, and can be entirely opened up to the tropical elements. The 1st floor bedrooms have a layered façade, consisting of an openable screen in front of deep terraces, and followed by full height glass. The spaces have been sculpted to maximize green views and bring in light and air.

We believe a home is not a decorated box; rather, we strive to make spaces that BREATHE.

Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design © H. Lin Ho Zeta House / 29 design Elevation Zeta House / 29 design Elevation Zeta House / 29 design Section

The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects

Architects: LIJO RENY architects
Location: Kolasseri, Thalassery, Kerala,
Design Team: Lijo Jos and Reny Lijo
Landscape: LIJO RENY.architects + Transform
Area: 507.93 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Paveen Mohandas

From the architect. The brief from the client was simple and short “a fort like house that one can’t scale”. As the site sat right in the middle of one of the rougher districts of Kerala the client wanted a house that looked intimidating. In fact that is the very feel that one gets as one stands outside trying to get in.

The form is a combination of plastered walls and exposed laterite wall. Laterite stone, once commonly used in Kerala architecture, has a direct visual appeal and a connection to the immediate surroundings, because of its earthy colour and tecture. The usage of this familiar stone in a new language, without losing its inane nature, would immediately root the design, at the same time, acknowledge the presence of a change, bridging this huge gap that has come about in the contemporary architectural practice that prevails in the state now.

The exposed laterite stone wall starts from the compound wall and winds through the landscaped yard into the building. More than as a wall or as an enclosure, it is like a flowing sculpture through the landscape. The monotony of the huge walls is broken by the various voids given at random on the laterite wall. The laterite stone was sourced from two different quarries for the two distinct colours that from a pattern throughout the wall .The vertical joints between the laterite stones were filled with a paste of white cement and powdered laterite stone, thus visibly accentuating the horizontal lines. The continuous horizontal lines give more fluidity/direction to the meandering wall.

The long drive way leads one to the sit out from where a sneak preview is given of hidden courts and landscaped spill out areas. From here one steps onto a clear glass bridge, over a water body that spills out as a cascade below the main door into an internal pool. So as the main door is opened one continues to walk on the clear glass, with the visual of the cascade below the feet. From here one can choose to go to the living or the dining, both these rooms opening out into a huge landscaped, spill out area enclosed by the meandering exposed laterite wall. The dining has a long lap pool with a corridor leading one to the bedrooms. The kitchen also lies just beyond the dining. The kitchen too opens up into another landscaped yard at the back with a badminton court.

The 3 storey high internal court with banana plants, ferns and many tropical plants, has the stairs taking one into the home theater below and the study above. The corridor above has several circular skylights competing with the circular ceiling lights to light up the area.

Most of the rooms have a play of levels with the ceiling, in the form of a combination of barrel vault and flat slab at the higher level with vents to expel the hot air. This combination has brought a marked difference in the room temperature compared to other regular forms.

Each and every bit of the site was considered during design and as a result it’s heartwarming to know that each of the members finding the various levels and areas in the house a new function and a new meaning.

The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects © Paveen Mohandas The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects Plan The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects Plan The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects Section The Running Wall Residence / LIJO RENY architects Section

Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect

Architects: James Russell Architect
Location: ,
Design Team: James Russell & Andrew Shindler
Area: 258 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Toby Scott

Builder: Crocker Builders
Engineer: Adrian Dine, ad.structure

From the architect. Winding through the estate on a 35-degree day, streets are empty, but the mechanical hum of airconditioners murmurs in the air, a sound sustaining the people concealed in houses on either side. Bisley Place House is at the end of this street. Here, children are running to and fro—not just the inhabitants, but neighborhood children, visitors from across fences. The aroma of fresh cooking carries unobstructed on the breeze from courtyard to curb. The ritual of cooking and meals happens right here on the street edge, a place for community.

The insular “hot boxes” germane to estates are not the fault of builders and property owners. Covenant writers—those charged with maintaining the consistency of the estate—prescribe minimum total floor area, garage space, façade materials, and roof pitch. But imagining between the lines of a building covenant presents another opportunity: A covenant as palette only. From this, spaces and materials can be put together in ways that optimise places for the people who use them.

Four large screen doors provide a veil to the street and admit gentle breezes as they build throughout the day. With a push of a button, these doors are able to tilt open to provide shade and threshold, an opportunity to initiate conversation with the street. Curtains are drawn to enclose space or redefine thresholds. Incorporating the outdoors into the indoor living spaces and establishing circulation throughout the entire site allows the dwelling to breathe. The house becomes a series of spaces along a passage, a journey that encourages relationships between people and their shared landscape.

The envelope is robust and permanent, with adaptable glazing, walls, and landscape. Structural brick and concrete comprise the outer sleeve of the dwelling, materials that are inherently strong, self-finishing, and can withstand diverse weather conditions. The inhabitant is therefore able to create and recreate their own space, manipulating skins; doors, windows and curtains to alternate between internal and external use. Single-layer brick walls construct the attic spaces, generating an expanse within the dwelling that is intentionally raw and technically outdoor. This is a place for dreaming, for study, for contemplation.

Systems to maximise the functional potential of brick by managing the flow of water through structural brick walls were developed. Flemish bond walls brace the building and create a weatherproof barrier to the rooms behind them. The roof retains a 22.5-degree pitch but no gables, twists, or turns. It slopes down to a central court, protecting the outdoor edge. And within the roof is a magical space—a veritable opening to the sky.

Thick foliage flourishes around and within the glazed black brick dwelling, a home that both welcomes the landscape and protects its inhabitants, with simple control and flexibility, from undesirable elements. The materials and making of space is honest and efficient, a nod to the functionality of industrial building. But, more significantly, the dwelling manages also to return to the original denotation of home: a unity with place and environment, a coalescence of community.

Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect © Toby Scott Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect Floor Plan Bilsey Place House / James Russell Architect Site Plan