Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects

Architects: Vanguarda Architects
Location: Avenida Nordelta, Buenos Aires Province,
Architect In Charge: Alejandro Amoedo
Area: 452.0 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of

Lead Designer: Lucas D’Adamo Baumann
Project Manager: Hernan Montes de Oca
Collaborators: Federico Segretin Sueyro, Clara Tarulla, Ma. Florencia Perez

From the architect. The geometry is solved through a simple S-shaped folded wall that allows the house to be opened to the front and rear façade, closing on its sides above and below alternatively to create the different areas of the layout. The right corner of the front, with a seven-meter projecting roof, includes the pedestrian access and space for parking the cars. To the rear façade, the sitting room, dining room and kitchen are integrated, followed by a large gallery that connects them to enjoy the views onto the garden, the pool and the lagoon that is behind the lot.

The ground floor is completed with a study, a toilet and the service area: laundry, pantry, storage room, bedroom and bathroom.

The upper floor, including the master suite, the music room and three bedrooms with the respective service rooms, opens the views onto the environment and is complemented by a large terrace on the side.

Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects Courtesy of Vanguarda Architects Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects Courtesy of Vanguarda Architects Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects Courtesy of Vanguarda Architects Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects Courtesy of Vanguarda Architects Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects Courtesy of Vanguarda Architects Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects Courtesy of Vanguarda Architects Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects Courtesy of Vanguarda Architects Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects Courtesy of Vanguarda Architects Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects Courtesy of Vanguarda Architects Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects Courtesy of Vanguarda Architects Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects Ground Floor Plan Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects Roof Floor Plan Cabo House / Vanguarda Architects Upper Floor Plan

Summer House / General Architecture

Architects: General Architecture
Location: Nannberga, Sweden
Project Architect: Erik Persson
Design Team: John Billberg, Fabian Blücher, Josef Eder, Olof Grip
Area: 76 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Mikael Olsson

Constructor: Ingemar Johansson, Rita Bygg
Client: Erik Persson

From the architect. We found a small granary for sale outside Borlänge, in the Dalarna region of Sweden. It was a modest in design and dimensions, but expressed an uncompromising constructive attitude that interested us: Timbering as pure tectonics, materialized as a precise joining of individual elements that form a coherent unity.

The house was taken apart and moved to an old pasture along the shores of Lake Hjälmaren, a few kilometers from Arboga. Concrete plinths were cast as a new foundation before the timber structure was put back up again. Between the 15th and the 16th timber row, a new load-bearing wooden framework was installed to allow for a full-height upper floor. Then the rest of the timber structure and the old roof was put in place. The house was left to settle for a year, after which the construction continued. Floors were built and the walls were isolated on the inside.

The interior walls of the upper floor were designed as floor-height trusses, spanning between the perimeter walls. This made it possible to leave the ground floor totally open, without any support for the upper floor. Interior materials were selected based on availability and price: oak wood from the site, and plywood from the local building merchant. The openings in the outer walls follow the logic of the design, with large windows in the massive timber wall and standing narrow windows fitted into the module of the new framework of the upper floor. The floor plan distribution is as simple as the volume, with a kitchen and living room in the ground floor and two bedrooms in the upper floor. Externally, the new additions were treated with the same red paint in a similar way as the original parts.

The project has, despite its small scale, served as a discussion of construction and architecture at our office. The use of an existing structure has also raised questions of the underlying structural and tectonic elements of the building tradition. Our ambition throughout the project has been to pursue and develop these basic architectural qualities.

Summer House / General Architecture © Mikael Olsson Summer House / General Architecture © Mikael Olsson Summer House / General Architecture © Mikael Olsson Summer House / General Architecture © Mikael Olsson Summer House / General Architecture © Mikael Olsson Summer House / General Architecture © Mikael Olsson Summer House / General Architecture © Mikael Olsson Summer House / General Architecture © Mikael Olsson Summer House / General Architecture © Mikael Olsson Summer House / General Architecture © Mikael Olsson Summer House / General Architecture © Mikael Olsson Summer House / General Architecture © Mikael Olsson Summer House / General Architecture © Mikael Olsson Summer House / General Architecture Floor Plan Summer House / General Architecture Floor Plan Summer House / General Architecture Site Plan Summer House / General Architecture Section Summer House / General Architecture Facade Summer House / General Architecture Facade Summer House / General Architecture Facade Summer House / General Architecture Facade

Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter

Architects: Enflo Arkitekter
Location: Gotland, Sweden
Architect In Charge: Jens Enflo (Enflo),Morten Vedelsbøl (DEVE)
Area: 104 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Joachim Belaieff

Engineer: Algeba Byggkonsulter
Builder: Fide Bygg&Snickeri

From the architect. A summer house for a young family. The site on the Swedish island Gotland in the Baltic Sea is surrounded by open fields to the north and low forest in the south.Local building traditions are important in this region, as well as for the architect and client.

The slim volume invites light into the house and makes nature alwayspresent. A tarred pine roof adds character to the sheer volume and spans the private bedrooms and bathroom, the indoor and outdoor living room and the guest room. In time, after a number of tar treatments the roof and the façade will have the same colour. Walls, floors, ceilings and kitchen are made of local pine.The outdoor living room is designed for the unstable Swedish summer climate with rain, wind and sun. Exterior sliding shades stop the wind, protects against sunlight and is used to close the house.

Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter © Joachim Belaieff Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter © Joachim Belaieff Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter © Joachim Belaieff Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter © Joachim Belaieff Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter © Joachim Belaieff Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter © Joachim Belaieff Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter Plan Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter Site Plan Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter Elevation Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter Section

Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter

Architects: Enflo Arkitekter
Location: Gotland,
Architect In Charge: Jens Enflo (Enflo),Morten Vedelsbøl (DEVE)
Area: 104 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Joachim Belaieff

Engineer: Algeba Byggkonsulter
Builder: Fide Bygg&Snickeri

From the architect. A summer house for a young family. The site on the Swedish island Gotland in the Baltic Sea is surrounded by open fields to the north and low forest in the south.Local building traditions are important in this region, as well as for the architect and client.

The slim volume invites light into the house and makes nature alwayspresent. A tarred pine roof adds character to the sheer volume and spans the private bedrooms and bathroom, the indoor and outdoor living room and the guest room. In time, after a number of tar treatments the roof and the façade will have the same colour. Walls, floors, ceilings and kitchen are made of local pine.The outdoor living room is designed for the unstable Swedish summer climate with rain, wind and sun. Exterior sliding shades stop the wind, protects against sunlight and is used to close the house.

Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter © Joachim Belaieff Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter © Joachim Belaieff Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter © Joachim Belaieff Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter © Joachim Belaieff Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter © Joachim Belaieff Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter © Joachim Belaieff Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter Plan Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter Site Plan Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter Elevation Gotland Summer House / Enflo Arkitekter Section

Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura

Architects: Ábaton Arquitectura
Location:
Furniture: BATAVIA
Area: 27 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Juan Baraja, Courtesy of Ábaton Arquitectura

From the architect. ÁBATON is proud to present its brand new Project Portable Home ÁPH80: 27sq mt, sectional and for immediate placement.

ÁBATON has developed the ÁPH80 series as a dwelling ideal for 2 people, easily transported by road and ready to be placed almost anywhere. The proportions are the result of a thorough study by our architects’ team so that the different spaces are recognizable and the feeling indoors is one of fullness. It is a simple yet sturdy  made of materials chosen to provide both comfort and balance. ÁPH80 embodies the principles and objectives of ÁBATON: wellbeing, environmental balance, and simplicity.

ÁPH80 has 3 different spaces measuring 27 sq mt (9×3): a living-room/kitchen, a full bathroom and double bedroom. Its gabled roof is 3,5mts high indoors. Most of the materials can be recycled and meet the sustainable criteria that ÁBATON applies to all its projects. It blends in with the environment thanks to its large openings that bring the outdoors inside. The use of wood throughout the building not only adds calmness and balance but it is also hypoallergenic. The sourced wood comes from regulated forests (will regrow to provide a wide range of other benefits such as further carbon storage, oxygen generation and forest habitat).

Technical Data: The outside is covered with grey cement wood board. Ventilated façade with 10cm thermal insulation around the building. Solid timber structure manufactured through numerical control; Inside timber panels made of Spanish Fir Tree dyed white. ÁPH80 has been designed and manufactured fully in Spain. Manufacturing time: 4-6 weeks. Assemby time: 1 day. Transportation by road.

We are currently developing simpler series which can be added to the ÁPH80 to suit every particular need, creating larger spaces and contributing to the project’s versatility.

Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura Courtesy of Ábaton Arquitectura Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura © Juan Baraja Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura Floor Plan Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura Elevation

Casa 45 / Alex Plana

Architects: Alex Plana
Location: , Maule Region,
Area: 285 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Pablo Blanco

Construction: José Luis Pavez
Stuctural: Ariel Avendaño

From the architect. House 39 is 285 sq. m with a floor plan designed for a 2-child family, but the house has the potential for expansion. The living room is quite large, with the possibility of being converted into two more bedrooms in the future.

The main request from the client was a classic Chilean house, with high ceilings, a tiled gable roof, and a conservative floor plan distribution.

Formally speaking, it was precisely the roof of the Chilean house which served as the starting point for our project, as we reimagined the proportions, forms and textures of this kind of house. One of the key characteristics of this style is high indoor ceilings, which vary in height from floor to ceiling between 3.2 m (for bedrooms, living room) and 5.8 m (in the dining room). We also preserved the slope of the gable roof while incorporating a new language that can be seen from the outside inwards. The aforementioned slopes offer a variation on the house’s interior ceilings, and culminate in dormers installed in various locations.

The main locations face the west in order to maximize the view of the Andes Mountains and south towards the other facilities.

Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana © Pablo Blanco Casa 45 / Alex Plana Site Plan Casa 45 / Alex Plana Plan Casa 45 / Alex Plana Elevations Casa 45 / Alex Plana Elevations Casa 45 / Alex Plana Sections Casa 45 / Alex Plana Sections Casa 45 / Alex Plana Sections

The Dune House by Min2

Dutch architects Jetty and Maarten Min have completed their own house and studio in North Holland with an arched rooftop, tiled walls and exposed tree-trunk columns (+ slideshow). (more...)

Huit House / tactic-a

Architects: tactic-a
Location: Lagos de Moreno, JAL,
Project Architects: Carlos Morán, Juan Martín
Project Area: 284 sqm
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Gerardo Dueñas, Diego Torres

Collaborators: Claudia Armida Pérez Campos, Julián López Louvet
Construction:
Structures: Samuel Soto
Soil Mechanics: Alfonso Ayala
Electrical: Jesús López
Joinery: Luis Carlos Bugarini
Masonry: Gerardo Alonso

From the architect. The location of this dwelling in Lagos De Moreno first led us to develop a typology related to its historical condition (north + west facades, open to the outside, try to approach the walls and scale similar to the foundation). In contrast, south + west facades playfully address contemporary living typologies currently undergoing an intense process of change and revision, which in this case is peculiarly attractive due to the degree of collaboration with the clients.

While the family consists of four members, only two rooms were built, one for the parents and another (with multiple customization options) for their two daughters, to encourage their negotiation skills and socialization. There is also a large social space, a home office for the couple to work in, and a media room that can function as a guestroom.

This program is materialized into a block in an L-shape. The upper level has a light roof divided into three sections of double triangles pointing eastward. The north facade has no openings, and windows barely appear on the west facade, ending with full transparency towards the garden in search of the best sunlight and thermal conditions (south).

A “ladder-bridge-lamp” system located in the heart of the house acts as a filter between activities: working, socializing and cooking. The upper level that contains the two bedrooms at the ends allows a double height for the home office and space for socializing.

Huit House / tactic-a © Gerardo Dueñas Huit House / tactic-a © Diego Torres Huit House / tactic-a © Diego Torres Huit House / tactic-a © Diego Torres Huit House / tactic-a © Gerardo Dueñas Huit House / tactic-a © Diego Torres Huit House / tactic-a Facade Huit House / tactic-a © Gerardo Dueñas Huit House / tactic-a Plan Level 01 Huit House / tactic-a Plan Level 00 Huit House / tactic-a Section A-A' Huit House / tactic-a Section C-C' Huit House / tactic-a Section B-B' Huit House / tactic-a Detail, facade section Huit House / tactic-a Detail, facade section Huit House / tactic-a Detail, facade section

BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis

Architects: Enrique Barberis
Location: , Buenos Aires Province,
Co Author: Guido Piaggio
Site Area: 1400 m2
Area: 350.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Alejandro Peral

From the architect. The house is situated at Pilar Town which is located at 42 kilometres from Buenos Aires city, Argentina.It was design to be used as a weekend house. Is located over an atypical land that is a corner and has a triangular shape.

We seeked for a simple answer for implantation through a strip on the ground floor, in whichsocial activity takes place: the desktop, the barbecue, the pool, patios, dining room and kitchen, melted in one space program.

Despite each space having its own mark, his personality, we worked on the idea of functional patency. On this strip rests a sober volume geometry, which is offset respect to the ground floor, creating different situations of access and galleries.

The sun path, was especially taken into consideration when deciding the implantation. So it was decided to open the house to the north to make possible to capture the morning sun, so that spills on every room of the house.

The south façade support services, bathrooms, kitchen, fireplace, and a cava protected from sunlight. The proximity of thestreet to this façade, sued to solve a a privacy issue.

In this search, the particular natural environment, characterized by foliage, shot a singular form of resolving a service façade, which offers organic blend with vegetation, and as a result adopt the protagonic character .

The patios articulate the interior and exterior of the house through uses. The concept was to build an unique interior – exterior space . The internal landscapes are modified with the different moments of the intensity of the sun and the succession of seasons.

The north facade, opens into the park, expressing the architectural program.The uses, colors, textures, patios, volumes, water, sun, grass, fire, life, are expressed synthetically, without outbursts, accompanying environmental harmony.

BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis © Alejandro Peral BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis Site Plan BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis Plan BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis Plan BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis Plan BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis Elevation BLLTT House / Enrique Barberis Elevation

Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects

Architects: Wolveridge Architects
Location: Blairgowrie,
Practice Team: Jerry Wolveridge, Sina Petzold, Ricky Booth, David Anthony
Year: 2012
Photographs: Ben Hosking

Builder And Construction Manager: Tim Prebble
Structural/Civil Engineer: Don Moore & Associates
Building Surveyor: Nepean Building Permits

From the architect. This extension to an existing two storey dwelling provides essential additional living areas for a family with three young boys. The original structure made very little connection with the surrounding property and had deficiencies in access to northern light.

By bringing the façade dramatically forward towards the street it was possible to incorporate the 3 required bedrooms above a large garage on street level. To separate the bedrooms from the new living area a north facing courtyard was introduced which also provides a terrific outlook towards the surroundingMoonah forest.

The block type form established from bringing the front of the dwelling forward and its western orientation influenced a design decision to create a complex series of openings in the façade,allowing forplenty of natural light to the children’s bedrooms within. The composition of openings is designed to restrict the inflow of undesirable west sun and provides a suitable level of visual engagement with the street. The cabinetry design integrates with the complex window arrangement on the outside, creating a playful sense within each bedroom.

The existing palette of dark stained western red cedar cladding and anodised aluminium window frames was carried through in the new work, integrating the original structure within the proposed design, but still providing a sense of separation.

Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects © Ben Hosking Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects Elevation Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects Elevation Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects Plan Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects Plan Blairgowrie House / Wolveridge Architects Section

Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury

Architects: Gaurav Roy Choudhury
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka,
Contractors: LISA and Ravikumar, Plumbtech Engineers, ACHU P. Enterprises
Area: 3,600 sqft
Year: 2013
Photographs: Tina Nandi

From the architect. Lateral House is located in a Bangalore and has been built for a young family, which looked to me for something pure. The brief however had a strict adherence to keep costs low and to abide by numerous Vaastu principles.

The attempt was to create a sculptural space which along with being bright and airy, segregated public and private spaces, played dramatically with scale and proportion and lastly and very importantly allow for a self sufficient unit which absorbs Bangalore’s beautiful climate even if the sites next door were to be built a foot away from it. (A growing trend in Bangalore)

The parking lot is hidden away below a mezzanine level as a ramp leads to the center of the house where the main door is located. The public spaces of the living, dining and guest bedroom are located at the lower level. As you climb up to the upper levels, the sanctity of privacy and the scale of the house increases.

The mezzanine becomes the mid level combining with the lower and upper level (more private) superfluously, yet maintaining the strict visual connects of entitled privacy of each, i.e. light and sky for the living and light and view for the upper level. The mid level opens into the north facing courtyard (above the car park), the heart of the house.

The house gets its light, ventilation from this garden/ courtyard as the bedrooms wrap around it. It is here where every day and night seeps into the house in their difference over the changing seasons. Height has been used as a privacy element and the staircase as an element of dramatic transformation. The brick facades on the elevations and courtyard express the house’s subtle relationship with the outside, as the projecting bricks cast varying shadows each day peculiar to that moment. The lateral house embellishes itself with simplicity and subtle beauty.

Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury © Tina Nandi Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury Floor Plan Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury Floor Plan Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury Section Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury Section Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury Section Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury Elevation Lateral House / Gaurav Roy Choudhury Elevation

Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design

Architects: Rolf Ockert Design
Location: NSW,
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of Rolf Ockert Design

From the architect. The client approached us to create house of their dreams on a site perched high over the Pacific Ocean, a home that was to make them feel like being on holiday every day. While the view was fantastic the site was very small and suffocated by overbearing neighbouring dwellings.

The finished house, though, feels generous and as if it is alone with the ocean and the sky.

Being tightly restricted by site conditions there were only two avenues we could take to create generosity of space and location:

Firstly the surprising height of the living room space that takes advantage of the only extravagant spatial dimension available to us.

And secondly the pursuit of sightlines to water and sky wherever possible. High side walls, for privacy but also to provide mass for a comfortable indoor climate, have continuous highlight windows for the enjoyment of 360° views of the sky. The large face concrete wall dominating the space has slim slot windows, allowing teasing glimpses of the ocean when entering the house while effectively cutting out the visual presence of the neighbour.

The house opens itself up completely to the East, the presentation of the stunning water views.

This also allows the capture of the constant ocean breezes to cool down the house throughout the year, easily regulated by a plethora of ventilation options from sliding doors to operable louvres.

A rich but reduced palette of strong, earthy materials, from the above mentioned concrete to Timber flooring and ceilings, rust metal finishes and thick, textured renders, contrasts with the fine detailing of the interior and anchors the residence against the airy, light aspect created by the opening to the views.

Sophisticated simplicity would be the most appropriate motto for the design of this house. Being on a very small block the client’s expectations of the generosity and design standard to be achieved required a very stringent approach. While the focus is naturally on the maximisation of the enjoyment of the majestic ocean views it was the suburban context that drove most of the major design decisions: The slotted northern concrete wall, the solid southern facade, the high roof with its continuous strip of highlight windows and louvres.

The house has transformed the lives of the clients. Having stepped back from a high powered, high income lifestyle they now enjoy the beach life and pursuit of their new occupations, writer and therapist respectively. This lifestyle is partly funded by the renting out of the house to high calibre visitors. The architectural quality and enhancement of the ocean location through the design is essential for this to be possible.

Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Courtesy of Rolf Ockert Design Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Courtesy of Rolf Ockert Design Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Courtesy of Rolf Ockert Design Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Courtesy of Rolf Ockert Design Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Courtesy of Rolf Ockert Design Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Courtesy of Rolf Ockert Design Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Courtesy of Rolf Ockert Design Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Courtesy of Rolf Ockert Design Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Courtesy of Rolf Ockert Design Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Courtesy of Rolf Ockert Design Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Courtesy of Rolf Ockert Design Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Upper Floor Plan Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Lower Floor Plan Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Elevation Bronte House / Rolf Ockert Design Section

The House Cast in Liquid Stone / SPASM Design Architects

Architects: SPASM Design Architects
Location: Khopoli, Maharashtra, India
Design Team: Sangeeta Merchant, Mansoor Kudalkar, Gauri Satam, Lekha Gupta, Sanjeev Panjabi
Area: 638 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Sebastian Zachariah

Contractors: IMPEX Engineers
Engineers: Rajeev Shah & Associates

From the architect. A second home on a rocky outcrop at the start of the western ghats (highlands),Khopoli, in Maharashtra, India. An area of high precipitation in the monsoons, and equal heat during the summers, the site changes remarkably from March to July, with the onset of the south westerly monsoons. Basalt the local black rock of the region is what this site was about.

We chose to build the house as an accretion on this rocky basalt outcrop with the same inherent material transformed. An outgrowth which was made of a mix of water, sand, cement and the granular basalt. Concrete finely honed to serve as refuge, to face the climatic changes that the site offered. The house was conceived as a cast for human occupation, a refuge which trapped the views, the sun, the rain, the air, and became one with the cliff edge it stood on. Akin to the growth of a coral, the substance of the walls and roof dictate the experience of inhabiting the site.

Stone has been used in many forms, based on use, wear, grip, texture. The dark saturated black matt-ness conjures a cool sense of refuge and calm. Photographs cannot express the sense of weight when one approaches, or the sense of release at the edge of the pool at the far end of the open terrace, the feeling of burrowing deeper enroute, past the stacked stones, to the lower bedroom.

The house, a cast, an object for living, whatever you may call it, has transformed into a belvedere to minutely observe and sense the of nature, of shade as a retreat against the sharp tropical sun, the resurgence of life, a sudden BURST of green, when the hard pounding monsoon arrives, the waft of breezes filling the air with the fragrance of moist earth, the movement of stars across the very dark night skies. To heighten the drama of the the site through what we build, without building a dramatic building!! A peculiar one YES…..

The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects © Sebastian Zachariah The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects Ground Floor Plan The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects Lower Floor Plan The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects Site Plan The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects Section The House Cast in Liquid Stone  / SPASM Design Architects Section

Lee House / Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio

Architects: Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan + 
Location: , São Paulo, Brazil
Collaborators: Carolina Castroviejo, Maria Cristina Motta, Mariana Simas, Oswaldo Pessano
Project Team: Gabriel Kogan, Lair Reis, Renata Furlanetto, Samanta Cafardo, Suzana Glogowski
Area: 900 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: FG+SG – Fernando Guerra

Interior Design: Diana Radomysler
Technical Drawings: Eduardo Chalabi, Ricardo Ariza
Landscape Architect: Gil Fialho
Structural Engineering: Benedicts Engenharia – Eng. Eduardo Duprat
Construction Manager: SC Consult – Eng. Sérgio Costa
Contractor: Gaia Construtora – Eng. Renato Luis Gonçalves, Eng. Eduardo Busin
Site Area: 9,000 sqm

From the architect. With the façade radically horizontal, the Lee House is organized in a single volume ground-floor site. All of the rooms therefore, establish a strong relationship with the external, opening out to the garden. The spatial continuity with the living room is larger: all of the windows are recessed creating an extension of the external space, with a large veranda. The living room then prolongs the pool deck and crosses to the other side of the lot.

These solutions are fit for the climate, the interior of the State of São Paulo, in the Brazilian southeast, which has elevated temperatures almost every day of the year. Strategies of traditional ambiental comfort of vernacular architecture and even Brazilian modern was used. The living room has cross-ventilation, which greatly lowers the internal temperature and the other rooms are protected by wooden muxarabis panels placed on sliding doors which filter the Sun without removing the ventilation.

The front veranda is delimited by a foyer in the façade revealing two wooden boxes divided by the social area. The kitchen opens to the living room, encrusted in one of the boxes that hold the utility areas. The bar opens out to the social area and is contained in the box that holds the bedroom as well. At the end of the corridor of the bedrooms, which can also be accessed from the outside of the house, there is a spa delimited by external walls and composed by a gym room, a sauna and a small outdoor pool encircled by the deck.

Besides the wood of the wooden boxes, the house is clad by White mortar and the internal patio of the spa is encircled by stones. The few materials used by the Lee house and the simple organization of the program create a minimalist atmosphere that extends from the outer to the inner areas of the house.

Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio © FG+SG - Fernando Guerra Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio Floor Plan Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio Section Lee House / Studio MK27 - Marcio Kogan + Eduardo Glycerio Section

Sandhill / Max Pritchard Architect

Architects: Max Pritchard Architect
Location: Sandhill, MS, USA
Builder: Holdfast Constructions
Area: 185 sqm
Year: 2008
Photographs: Sam Noonan

From the architect. A well vegetated sandhill with coastal views to the north, required a solution that minimised site disturbance and maximised views of the bush and sea, and provided a relaxed holiday atmosphere.

Relationship of Form to Site

The concept of 3 distinct pavilions linked by an open, covered stepped walkway satisfied the above criteria. The multiple pavilion concept also provides privacy, whilst allowing economical open, light framed pavilions.

Functional Performance

The clients, with five children, are able to share the house with friends for extended periods and report how well the unique concept works.  There is no oven or hot plate, the kitchen is a high bench, with refrigerator under and a concealed sink.  The island bench becomes the focus for all to participate in food preparation, before firing the outdoor barbeque.

Sustainability

·  Solar hot water

·  No artificial cooling, relying on cross ventilation and encouraging the use of outdoors.  The clients report how well the concept works with occupants being able to move around to find comfortable conditions during the hottest summer days.

·  Double glazed timber windows to living area.

·  Efficient combustion heater.

Summary

A unique concept, maximising the use of outdoors, with interest and variety in the design providing both stimulation, comfort and privacy yet “togetherness” in a beautiful setting, the antithesis of the “look at me” approach to architecture.

Sandhill / Max Pritchard Architect © Sam Noonan Sandhill / Max Pritchard Architect © Sam Noonan Sandhill / Max Pritchard Architect © Sam Noonan Sandhill / Max Pritchard Architect © Sam Noonan Sandhill / Max Pritchard Architect © Sam Noonan Sandhill / Max Pritchard Architect © Sam Noonan Sandhill / Max Pritchard Architect © Sam Noonan Sandhill / Max Pritchard Architect © Sam Noonan Sandhill / Max Pritchard Architect © Sam Noonan Sandhill / Max Pritchard Architect Floor Plan Sandhill / Max Pritchard Architect Floor Plan Sandhill / Max Pritchard Architect Elevation

More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos

Architects: Acha Zaballa Arquitectos
Location: Castro Urdiales, Cantabria, Spain
Architect In Charge: Ignacio Zaballa Llano
Project Architects: Cristina Acha Odriozola, Miguel Zaballa Llano
Area: 176 sqm
Photographs: Josema Cutillas

Plot Surface: 505 sqm
Budget: 235,000 €
Constructor: Construcciones Iturriaga

From the architect. The single-family house is located in the residential area of Montealegre, a prominently green rural area that lately is being colonized by new dwellings and low density developments. In this setting with beatiful sights and various vecinitys, considering the small size of the plot and its building codes an optimization exercise is proposed. The goal is to get maximun performance of the exterior enjoyable space as well as of the built volume.

The plot geometry is irregular though closed to a square plan. Once applied the rules of maximun buildability and minimun distances to the boundarys, it results a central square plan surface surrounded by a homogeneus band (5-7 meters wide) without cualification in wich is difficult to escape from the violence imposed by the closed contigous properties. It is not posible to achive an outer intimate area for resting and playing due to the limits of the plot extension. So we proposed to build it in heigth.

We proposed excavating the SE-SW alignment to ensure a private and sunny underneath garden. The owners passion for mountaineering and climbing helped in the discussion about the convenience of renouncing a covered garage in favour of an exterior excavated garden. The folds of the retaining walls suitable for climb practise were a positive argument.

Two volumes of 7,50×9,30m rest on a third of 4,80×9,30m under ground, each one sliding over the previous. The volume composition is accompanied by the south emptied space, which opens the underground floor on the SE-SW facade.

The project implies the creation of various exterior spaces, covered and uncovered, below and over the hang volumes and the multiplication of uses once the privacy is guaranteed.

The terrace open to the south and facing the neighbouring roof. The underneath platform open to the south, protected from external visuals , covered and uncovered area, sun and shade for summer days.

The groundfloor porch, covered place in front of the kitchen. The reinforced concrete containing walls with its folds willing to approach ‘the natural’ serves as outdoor climbing support.

The stairs and serving units form a central column that organizes the inner space. Towards one side and another rooms and living room are displayed.

The constructive strategy involves seriation not only in volume but in facades compositition. Only one same size window appears on each elevation.

The constructive solutions seek sobriety both in the detail execution and in the repetoire of materials. The house aims to achieve maximun efficiency and profitabilty from clear management strategies of building set on the plot and construction clearence in terms of materials and systems employed.

More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos © Josema Cutillas More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos © Josema Cutillas More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos © Josema Cutillas More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos © Josema Cutillas More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos © Josema Cutillas More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos © Josema Cutillas More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos © Josema Cutillas More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos © Josema Cutillas More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos © Josema Cutillas More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos © Josema Cutillas More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos © Josema Cutillas More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos © Josema Cutillas More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos Plan More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos Plan More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos Plan More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos Plan More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos Plan More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos Section More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos Diagram More House / Acha Zaballa Arquitectos Diagram

Claro House / Juan Carlos Sabbagh

Architects: Juan Carlos Sabbagh
Location: Hacienda Chicureo, Colina, Santiago,
Project Architects: Juan Carlos Sabbagh, Gonzalo Cardemil
Project Area: 411.8 sqm
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Francisca Polanco

Structures: INGEVSA (Eduardo Valenzuela)
Construction: Alcoy
Heating: Nat Clima
Electricity: Concha & Gana
Lighting: Oriana Ponzini
Automation: Home Control S.A.
Landscape: Piera Sartori
Soil Mechanics: GEOFUN
Site Supervision: Ramon Goldsack Y Asociados
Plumbing: Jose Giaretti
Total Ground Area: 2,383 sqm
Project Year: 2007
Materials: Concrete, stone, wood

From the architect. The project consists of a single family house located in Hacienda de Chicureo, in the district of Colina.

Chicureo is very hot during summer, which is why the starting point of the project was to address the climate issue.

This is why the house is designed in a single floor based on courtyards, to protect it with the shadows of the trees, and so that it is close to the soil moisture. We also use stone walls, which contribute to the protection from high sun exposure from the west with their great mass.

Architecturally, the house is built from a series of slabs that form horizontal layers containing planters and the roof. These slabs are perforated or supported on exposed concrete or stone walls.

Two of these stone walls break the roof slab and are taller to allow the appearance of the two main interior courtyards of the house that make up the landscape inside, bringing light, sunlight in winter, ventilation in summer, and also give form to the interior program.

In this way, the house is divided into two areas, the more public and service area (such as living room, dining room, kitchen) and the private area (bedrooms and family room).

To the east are the bedrooms with views of the mountains and the morning sun. To the north, the main living room and dining areas are protected by a large covered terrace, and face the golf course. On both facades, an overhang protects from rain and sun.

To the west, we intended to protect from the sun and to blend with the environment. Thus, the facade is more opaque, made up from a great stone wall that is interrupted intermittently in the manner of the ‘pircas’, typical of the surrounding fields.

Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh © Francisca Polanco Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh Plan Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh Diagram Casa Claro / Juan Carlos Sabbagh Section