The DNA of Planned Communities


[The Sea Ranch Lodge, Photo by BUILD LLC] Anyone in a design-related profession toils with the constraints imposed on the objects of their labor. For architects, these come in the form of ever-increasing land use codes, building codes, and community covenants. And to say that these rules have a real effect on houses and buildings is an understatement. In extreme examples, such regulations can all but shape a project. This enforced control of the built environment often seems antithetical to the very innovation and creativity that architecture aims to achieve, and yet it is precisely these constraints that make a place harmonious and exceptional under the right circumstances. For quite some time now, the circumstances we’ve been most fascinated with are those of planned communities. Some planned communities are among the most thoughtful built-environments we’ve experienced, while others are middling or feel like a weak replica of past times
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Neighborhood Center Refurbishment in Noallo de Abaixo / Muiños Otero López Arquitectura

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© Héctor Santos-Diez © Héctor Santos-Diez
  • Promoter: Concello de Castrelo de Miño
  • Builder: ATCON S.L.
  • Project Manager: Víctor Lorenzo Salgado
  • Metallic Constructions: CUESME
  • Lighting: Lledó
  • Electrical Installations: Suarez Electrical Installations
  • Milwork: Meijón e Hijos
  • Façade: FINSA
  • Budget: 49,997.00 €
© Héctor Santos-Diez © Héctor Santos-Diez
Previous stage
The proposed action aims to recover the old unitary school as a neighborhood center of Noallo de Abaixo. When the previous building is in a situation of total ruin, with the structure about to collapse, the entire project is reformulated.
© Héctor Santos-Diez © Héctor Santos-Diez

On the ground floor a single polyvalent diaphanous room is organized, intended for various activities (lectures, workshops, meetings, meals, courses, etc). In addition to the main room, an area of trade and a toilet adapted to the disabled

© Héctor Santos-Diez
© Héctor Santos-Diez
Situation
© Héctor Santos-Diez
© Héctor Santos-Diez
© Héctor Santos-Diez
Isometric and Sketches
© Héctor Santos-Diez
© Héctor Santos-Diez
© Héctor Santos-Diez
© Héctor Santos-Diez
© Héctor Santos-Diez
© Héctor Santos-Diez
© Héctor Santos-Diez
© Héctor Santos-Diez
Continue reading "Neighborhood Center Refurbishment in Noallo de Abaixo / Muiños Otero López Arquitectura"

Tirrases Human Development Center / Luis Diego Barahona

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© Roberto D’Ambrosio © Roberto D’Ambrosio
  • Architects: Luis Diego Barahona
  • Location: Calle 41, Los Yoses Sur, San José, Costa Rica
  • Project Manager: Municipalidad de Curridabat
  • Executive Unit : Fundación Costa Rica-Canadá
  • Main Collaborator: Karina Vindas
  • Structural Engineering: FSA Ingeniería & Arquitectura
  • Electromechanica Engineering: FSA Electromecánica
  • Financing: Ministerio de Vivienda y Asentamientos Humanos y BANHVI
  • Awards: Premio Diseño Urbano Construido en la Bienal Internacional de Arquitectura Costa Rica 2018 y Premio ALPU (Categoría Arquitectónico Construido, otorgado por la Asociación Latinoamericana de Planificadores Urbanos en la BIACR-2018)
  • Area: 27534.08 ft2
  • Project Year: 2018
  • Photographs: Roberto D’Ambrosio, Oscar Abarca, Ingrid Johanning
© Roberto D’Ambrosio © Roberto D’Ambrosio

Text description provided by the architects. The Center is presented as a new convergence and social interaction focus, directed to increase the human development of Tirrases. It is located between La Cometa Building and Las Mercedes Pedestrian Walkway, and it is a three-story building that hosts a children’s library,

© Oscar Abarca
Plan 02
© Oscar Abarca
© Oscar Abarca
Section 03
© Roberto D’Ambrosio
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Village Center in Sanhe / Wall Architects of XAUAT

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Texture, Volume and depth. Image © TrimontImage - Dong Wang Texture, Volume and depth. Image © TrimontImage - Dong Wang
  • Architects: Wall Architects of XAUAT
  • Location: Sanhe, Fuping, Shanxi, China
  • Lead Architects: Rui Wu, Shaochong Li, Maozhen Wang
  • Design Team: Chuang Liu,Xuan Li, Wanjing Zhao, Jinlong Hong
  • Area: 790.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2018
  • Photographs: TrimontImage - Dong Wang
  • Structural Engineer: Xinge Wang
  • Mep Engineer: Rui Hu, Xue Cheng
  • Design Consultant: Xiaojun Shi, Xinghui Li
  • Technical Consultant: Li Gao
  • Client: Sanhe village committee
The exterior view at night. Image © TrimontImage - Dong Wang The exterior view at night. Image © TrimontImage - Dong Wang

Text description provided by the architects. The project is situated in Sanhe Village, Fuping County, Shaanxi Province, China. This historical village is rich in resources. It is a typical representative of “Guan Zhong” villages and contains a spiritual characteristic reminiscent of the traditional homes of the Shaanxi people. Today, as the spiritual pursuit and cultural heritage become more and more important, the village carries an increasingly important

© TrimontImage - Dong Wang
The entrance of happiness courtyard. Image © TrimontImage - Dong Wang
Flowing interior space. Image © TrimontImage - Dong Wang
design sketch (horizontality and verticality of courtyard)
Flowing interior space. Image © TrimontImage - Dong Wang
Rural exhibition space. Image © TrimontImage - Dong Wang
Corridor bridge, courtyard and volume. Image © TrimontImage - Dong Wang
Steps, children and light. Image © TrimontImage - Dong Wang
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Stapleford Granary / MCW Architects

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© Jim Stephenson © Jim Stephenson
  • Mep Engineers: Smith & Wallwork
  • Civil & Structural Engineers: KJ Tait
  • Quantity Surveyor: Bremner Partnership LLP
  • Landscape: The Landscape Partnership
  • Contractor : TJ Evers
  • Client: ACE Foundation
© Jim Stephenson © Jim Stephenson

Text description provided by the architects. The ACE Foundation is a Cambridge based charity with the aim of encouraging and developing cultural understanding. Providing support for educational projects, courses and summer schools, both locally and internationally, the ACE Foundation has played a pioneering role in adult and continuing education. The Foundation provides a whole host of educational activities, from worldwide study tours to financial support for a variety of educational projects around the globe. The Foundation purchased a Victorian farm in 2009 on

© Jim Stephenson
Ground floor / First floor
© ACE Foundation
© Jim Stephenson
© Jim Stephenson
© ACE Foundation
Section A-A / Section B-B
© Jim Stephenson
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Le Vaud Polyvalent Hall / LOCALARCHITECTURE

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© Matthieu Gafsou © Matthieu Gafsou
  • Wood Engineer: Ratio Bois Sàrl, Ecublens
  • Civil Engineer: 2M ingéniérie civile SA, Yverdon-les-Bains
  • Cvs Engineer: Weinmann-Energies SA, Echallens
  • Lighting: Etienne Gillabert, Paris + Aebischer & Bovigny, Lausanne
  • Geometric Engineer: Bovard & Nickl SA, Nyon
© Matthieu Gafsou © Matthieu Gafsou

Text description provided by the architects. Le Vaud’s new community hall is a multipurpose public infrastructure designed to serve and bring together the entire village community. Hosting sports activities, shows, and community events, it supplements existing school facilities while opening up new possibilities for the village and its surrounding communities. The hall’s entrance is sited very appropriately on the road connecting the village church and the school entrance.

© Matthieu Gafsou © Matthieu Gafsou

A forecourt of exposed concrete marks the venue’s entrance, a connecting link bordered by the sports field, the church

Upper Floor Plan
© Matthieu Gafsou
Lower Floor Plan
© Matthieu Gafsou
Section
© Matthieu Gafsou
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Reconstruction and Extension Inselhalle Lindau / Auer Weber

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© Aldo Amoretti © Aldo Amoretti
  • Architects: Auer Weber
  • Location: Zwanzigestrasse 10, 88131 Lindau, Germany
  • Lead Architects: Auer Weber
  • Architect In Charge: Till Richter
  • Project Director: Florian Zopfy
  • Design Team: Doris Binder, Daniela Hohenhorst, Duc Hua, Christina Stein, Daniela Sacher, Mohan Zeng
  • Area: 10360.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2018
  • Photographs: Aldo Amoretti
  • Bidding: Axel Hellmes; Construction management: Heinz Wendl, Markus Schoch, Martin Stang, Franz Stinner, Michael Wegner, Moritz Wolf
  • Wayfinding: Sägenvier DesignKommunikation
  • Landscape Architects: Rainer Schmidt Landschaftsarchitekten
  • Structural Engineering: Boll und Partner
  • Technical Equipment: Ingenieurgesellschaft für Haustechnik Wetzstein
  • Heating: Herrenberg
  • Ventilation: Herrenberg
  • Plumbing: Herrenberg
  • Electrical Engineering: Raible + Partner, Ditzingen
  • Fire Safety: mhd Brandschutz
  • Project Controlling: Hitzler Ingenieure
© Aldo Amoretti © Aldo Amoretti

Text description provided by the architects. The renowned Nobel Laureate Meetings are the most distinguished among the various conferences that enjoy the flair of the island town of Lindau. Over the years, however, the conference venue was no longer meeting modern demands.

© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti
Ground Floor 1/500
© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti
Continue reading "Reconstruction and Extension Inselhalle Lindau / Auer Weber"

Architecture as Urban Puzzle Piece


[All images by BUILD LLC] The first thing a passerby might notice about the 602 Flats building, recently completed at the corner of 12th Ave East & East Mercer on Seattle’s Capitol Hill, is one of two forty-foot tall green walls or the solar panel rain screen system. These systems are an uncommon feature for an apartment building, especially in Seattle’s booming market of generic apartment mega-blocks. These wall systems are expressive of the resourcefulness and innovation required to design, permit, develop, and construct a small, multi-family building in Seattle these days. Rising construction costs and a scarcity of tradespeople in the Pacific Northwest required that the architecture team from BUILD LLC implement a laser-focused design strategy that limited the variables. An overwhelmed building department also posed challenges with constantly moving goalposts, necessitating that the owners and design team exercise creative problem solving and a high tolerance for protracted schedule
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The Power of Blogging as a Small Firm Architect

The Power of Blogging for Architects

The blog is still one of the most effective tools a small firm architect can use to foster community. The goal when writing a blog is to gain an audience. Over time, if encouraged to interact, your audience will develop into a community. A community will guide you, support you and share your content with others. A community will help your audience grow. A community will help you succeed. Small firm architects are busy people. We are not seeking more obligations, taking more of our time. If not managed properly, writing a post can easily consume most of a work day to complete. A weekly publication schedule can very quickly discourage any busy professional, causing them to abandon one of the most effective tools they may have to gain new projects. I launched the Living Well in Westchester blog in 2006, where I shared Continue reading "The Power of Blogging as a Small Firm Architect"

S2V 2018


[From left to right: Aaron Freedman, Pete Nelson, Brian Boram, David Branson, Albert Shum, Aaron Pambianco, Mark Carson, Greg Plaunt, John Reynolds, Peter Gray, Kevin Eckert, Sweet Tea Smith] As we do each August for the past 8 years, BUILD LLC and friends departed from our Seattle office and pedaled to Vancouver BC for the 9th annual Seattle to Vancouver invitational charity ride. This is our yearly opportunity to train up to our peak fitness, visit with old friends, and raise awareness and dollars for a worthy cause.
[Photo Credit: Brian Boram] Our official fundraising has now come to an end (though donations toward the cause are always accepted, of course), and as we do to commemorate each ride, we wanted to take a moment to reflect on another safely completed, 188 mile bike ride. While this year’s journey offered more liquid sunshine than most other years, which helped to
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Why Seattle’s New Early Community Outreach Requirement Will Actually Damage the City

Seattle, like many large cities, has a required Design Review process for most large-scale commercial, multifamily and mixed-use projects. This program is run by the Seattle Department of Construction and Inspections (SDCI) and the size thresholds for this program vary by zone and project type. For instance, Design Review is required for a townhouse project in a Low Rise (LR) zone with more than 8 dwelling units. Similarly, Design Review is also required for an apartment building in a Midrise (MR) zone with more than 20 units. According to the SDCI, there are three principle objectives of this Design Review process:
1. To encourage excellence in site planning and design of projects such that they enhance the character of the City.
2. To provide flexibility in the application of development standards.
3. To improve communication and participation among developers, neighbors and the City early in the process. This design review
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A BUILD Shift


[Photos by BUILD LLC] From the earliest days, BUILD has operated with the clear intention of being generalists in an increasingly specialized world and working within a framework of adaptability and agility, with a focus on action. We are a service-based company with the primary goal of championing our client’s interests while, in the old adage, striving to leave each (client, place, relationship) better than we found it.
 

“Integrity is the essence of everything successful.” -R. Buckminster Fuller

 
As a firm, we’ve created many projects, weathered many storms, fostered many relationships and have made numerous incremental adjustments in our approach and our identity. As with any enterprise, we’ve gone through shifts in the past, and recently, we identified an opportunity to sharpen our focus and make changes to improve our firm. With a renewed focus of our internal team and on how to best serve our clients
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The Park Modern Turns 10


[Photo by BUILD LLC] The University District’s mixed-use Park Modern building recently turned ten years old and the project offers a wealth of knowledge in Seattle’s current real estate market. Having weathered a decade’s worth of gray winters, a great recession, and the daily wear and tear of an urban environment, it’s an appropriate time for a performance review. The Seattle building’s footprint was configured to optimize the small 7,500sf site, an area equivalent to 1.5 single family home sites. Two small, adjacent parcels had been purchased and combined, which allowed the project to have critical mass in scale as well as enough value for construction financing. Although a project of smaller margins, this type of bootstrapping may be even more relevant with today’s challenges of creating affordable housing using modestly scaled infill projects. As available City lots are becoming scarce, while the city’s population continues to grow, the
Continue reading "The Park Modern Turns 10"

The Park Modern Turns 10


[Photo by BUILD LLC] The University District’s mixed-use Park Modern building recently turned ten years old, and the project offers a wealth of knowledge in Seattle’s current real estate market. Having weathered a decade’s worth of gray winters, a great recession, and the daily wear and tear of an urban environment, it’s an appropriate time for a performance review. The Seattle building’s footprint was configured to optimize the small 7,500sf site, an area equivalent to 1.5 single family home sites. Two small, adjacent parcels had been purchased and combined, which allowed the project to have critical mass in scale as well as enough value for construction financing. Although a project of smaller margins, this type of bootstrapping may be even more relevant with today’s challenges of creating affordable housing using modestly scaled infill projects. As available City lots are becoming scarce, while the city’s population continues to grow, the
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Open Letter to the Mayor

Dear Mayor Durkan, We welcome you to office and admire your direct and candid comments regarding the issues of affordable housing and homelessness shared during your campaign. Your initiatives reflect the concerns of the community at large and your position resonates with many in the community. As you are transitioning from advocate/ candidate, to head of a Seattle in need of steady leadership, all while balancing many voices and agendas, we want to provide you with the collective information that we think will aid your success as mayor of Seattle. You and your opponent spent much of your respective campaigns discussing our current population growth and impacts on our city as well as potential policy changes in Urban Design and building development for Seattle. We have been engaged in this conversation professionally and personally for some time. We’ve taken the opportunity to first get facts and figures straight regarding Seattle’s
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Architectural Origins, Educations and Risks; A Conversation with Steven Holl and Ed Weinstein, Part 2


[Steven Holl and Ed Weinstein, photo by BUILD LLC] Last summer, BUILD sat down with Steven Holl and Ed Weinstein in Seattle’s Pike Place Market to discuss their humble beginnings, their common educational paths, and the life experiences that produced two distinctively successful architecture practices. For part 1 of the conversation, hop over to ARCADE Magazine, Issue 35.3, available in print and on their website. You’ve both been described as individuals who completely dedicated themselves to the practice of architecture. What has this entailed in your own lives?
Steven Holl: I think for me, architecture was the right thing to do. It’s something you believe in. I never had a doubt. I wasn’t going to do commercial work, but there were doubts I could survive and that’s why teaching was important. Then my firm won some competitions, like the Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art in Helsinki in 1993, which
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Seattle’s Housing Crisis: Encouraging better development


[Image by BUILD LLC] Seattle is currently experiencing unprecedented population growth along with record setting development. This is challenging the city’s growth management and it’s bringing city zoning and building code decisions to the forefront of the discussion. As architects and Seattleites deeply concerned with the quality of life and well-being of the communities around us, we’ve been thinking a great deal about the codes and policies that regulate our built environment (or in some instances, don’t it regulate properly). It’s a critical moment in Seattle, and calibrating the city’s policies correctly could result in vibrant neighborhoods that support diversity, inclusion, and quality of life. Conversely, making uninformed decisions or failing to make decisions altogether won’t just result in urban paralysis, it will bleed Seattle of its character and quality of life. In 2014, Seattle launched the Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA) which gathered the collective research and wisdom
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Desert Palisades Guardhouse by Studio AR+D Architects

                                                <a href="http://design-milk.com/desert-palisades-guardhouse-by-studio-ard-architects/desert-palisades-guardhouse-1/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="http://design-milk.com/images/2017/10/Desert-Palisades-Guardhouse-1-810x540.jpg" alt="Desert Palisades Guardhouse by Studio AR+D Architects" /></a>
                                To round out the much anticipated residential development, Desert Palisades, <a href="http://www.studio-ard.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Studio AR+D Architects</a> were tasked with designing their 915 square foot <a href="http://www.studio-ard.com/projects/desert-palisades-guardhouse/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">guardhouse</a> on the hills overlooking Palm Springs. The natural setting, along with the future homes being built there, were the inspiration for the design – modern, yet industrial to fit in with the rugged landscape. That led to a selection of materials that would not only be timeless, but that would last in the harsh, desert environment.
The design team chose to cantilever the roof out over the driveways and a massive boulder that rests below it. The roof and boulder don’t touch but the design looks as if it was built to accommodate the natural stone. The exaggerated roof line, which spans 34 feet, tests the limits as to what engineering is capable of, almost making you feel as if the modest building might tip over. Steel and
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Seattle’s Housing Crisis: Getting the Facts Straight

There’s a heightened discussion in Seattle lately around the overwhelming population growth the city is facing, along with the increasing demand of the housing necessary to accommodate everyone. The topic of housing (or lack thereof) has become a critical platform for the politicians, a code-red concern for neighborhoods and, if you’re in the design world, it’s the primary topic of discussion at most professional gatherings. The tension on the subject of housing right now in Seattle has reached its boiling point and BUILD will be launching a series of blog posts on the topic to help clarify the issues, give voice to good solutions, and better educate ourselves and our community on the situation. One noticeable aspect that’s confusing the conversation around Seattle’s housing crisis is the lack of consistent information. It seems that every time we get into a discussion about population growth in Seattle, different statistics are declared
Continue reading "Seattle’s Housing Crisis: Getting the Facts Straight"

Seattle’s Housing Crisis: Getting the Facts Straight

There’s a heightened discussion in Seattle lately around the overwhelming population growth the city is facing, along with the increasing demand of the housing necessary to accommodate everyone. The topic of housing (or lack thereof) has become a critical platform for the politicians, a code-red concern for neighborhoods and, if you’re in the design world, it’s the primary topic of discussion at most professional gatherings. The tension on the subject of housing right now in Seattle has reached its boiling point and BUILD will be launching a series of blog posts on the topic to help clarify the issues, give voice to good solutions, and better educate ourselves and our community on the situation. One noticeable aspect that’s confusing the conversation around Seattle’s housing crisis is the lack of consistent information. It seems that every time we get into a discussion about population growth in Seattle, different statistics are declared
Continue reading "Seattle’s Housing Crisis: Getting the Facts Straight"