Philipp Schenk-Mischke Creates Organically-Formed Objects Using Unconventional Techniques

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/philipp-schenk-mischke-creates-organically-formed-objects-using-unconventional-techniques/psm-installation-view-2_web/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/09/PSM-Installation-View-2_WEB-810x540.jpg" alt="Philipp Schenk-Mischke Creates Organically-Formed Objects Using Unconventional Techniques" /></a>
                                For his final project at the Royal College of Art in London, graduate student <a href="http://schenkmischke.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Philipp Schenk-Mischke</a> designed a set of ceramic vases and a small collection of furniture pieces that blur the lines between everyday objects and conceptual furniture. Collectively, the project is called &#8220;Process Plug-Ins.&#8221;
With BTM Ceramics, Schenk-Mischke wanted to experiment in reinterpreting classic object types by analyzing the way they’re made or used. While most ceramics are left alone to dry once they have taken form, Schenk-Mischke distorts his ceramics but placing them on a body vibration plate (the same kind used in the fitness industry) that gently shakes and vibrates the formed pieces into more organic shapes. By introducing this plug-in (defined as a component that’s designed to enhance a process or system by adding an extra feature or function), Schenk-Mischke changes pre-conceived notions about how a certain process is “supposed” to be. Primitive Fixings
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Philipp Schenk-Mischke Creates Organically-Formed Objects Using Unconventional Techniques

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/philipp-schenk-mischke-creates-organically-formed-objects-using-unconventional-techniques/psm-installation-view-2_web/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/09/PSM-Installation-View-2_WEB-810x540.jpg" alt="Philipp Schenk-Mischke Creates Organically-Formed Objects Using Unconventional Techniques" /></a>
                                For his final project at the Royal College of Art in London, graduate student <a href="http://schenkmischke.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Philipp Schenk-Mischke</a> designed a set of ceramic vases and a small collection of furniture pieces that blur the lines between everyday objects and conceptual furniture. Collectively, the project is called &#8220;Process Plug-Ins.&#8221;
With BTM Ceramics, Schenk-Mischke wanted to experiment in reinterpreting classic object types by analyzing the way they’re made or used. While most ceramics are left alone to dry once they have taken form, Schenk-Mischke distorts his ceramics but placing them on a body vibration plate (the same kind used in the fitness industry) that gently shakes and vibrates the formed pieces into more organic shapes. By introducing this plug-in (defined as a component that’s designed to enhance a process or system by adding an extra feature or function), Schenk-Mischke changes pre-conceived notions about how a certain process is “supposed” to be. Primitive Fixings
Continue reading "Philipp Schenk-Mischke Creates Organically-Formed Objects Using Unconventional Techniques"

Architecturally-Inspired Planters by Anchor Ceramics

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/architecturally-inspired-planters-anchor-ceramics/anchor-ceramics-1/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/09/anchor-ceramics-1-810x508.jpg" alt="Architecturally-Inspired Planters by Anchor Ceramics" /></a>
                                Founded by Bruce Rowe, Melbourne-based studio <a href="https://www.anchorceramics.com/#anchor-ceramics" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Anchor Ceramics</a> created a range of planters that strike a balance between the organic forms found in wheel-thrown pottery and the clean lines found in architecture.
The planters come in two different styles: the Undercut, which has a small step carved at the base, and the Funnel, inspired by traditional water pipes that have a wider mouth than the base. The range is available in various colors inspired by the Australian landscape, including speckled white, speckled grey, sage grey, charcoal, olive green, and traditional terracotta. Anchor Ceramics is available online and at the showroom of Robert Plumb.
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Ceramicist Eunbi Cho’s Invisible City of Clay

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/eunbi-cho-invisible-city-of-clay/eunbi-cho-5/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/07/Eunbi-Cho-5-810x551.jpg" alt="Ceramicist Eunbi Cho&#8217;s Invisible City of Clay" /></a>
                                Inside a small studio located at an armpit intersection conjoining the Los Angeles State Historic Park with one of the city&#8217;s most defiantly industrial zones, ceramicist <a href="https://www.eunbi.us/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Eunbi Cho</a> has been busy conjuring the skyline of an imaginary city. Piece by piece, the LA ceramicist has diligently composed a cityscape once only mapped by memory, inspired by a 1972 Italian novel about imaginary cities.

A quartet of examples of Cho’s “Made for Play” catalog of geometric ceramics. Cho’s sense of humor adds a colorful veneer to the serious skill required to realize forms intended to be used daily.

Cho has steadily gained the attention of ceramic lovers locally and globally for a body of work characterized by its energetic combinations of colors drawn from traditional Korean textiles intermingled with a bizarro-geometric sensibility in the same vein of Ettore Sottsass. Under the banner of “made for play”, each of Cho’s pieces operate with
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