Sukkah City: An Architectural Take on an Old Tradition

Each year, Joshua Foer, author of the bestseller Moonwalking with Einstein, would celebrate sukkot (a traditional Jewish holiday) with his family by building a , a small temporary shelter that acts as a reminder of the Jews’ plight after being expelled from Egypt. Years later, he co-founded a competition to challenge architects to consider the holiday from a designer’s point of view. Sukkah City, a documentary on the competition, follows a couple projects through their inspiration and . Read more about it here.

Center for Manufacturing Innovation by Brooks + Scarpa

Brooks + Scarpa have designed the Center for Manufacturing Innovation in Monterrey, Mexico.

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Description

Located in Mexico’s Research Park for Technical Innovation (PIIT), a science and technology park, which is a partnership between government, universities and the private sector to seek economic growth through technical innovation. The 1000 hectare campus is host to more than 50 research centers devoted to R&D as well as the development of technology innovation in nanotechnology, biotechnology, mechatronics and advanced manufacturing, information technology, clean energy and advanced materials development.

Metalsa SA began as a family-owned company, founded by Guillermo Zambrano Gutierrez in 1956 that manufactures chassis and structural body components worldwide for a variety of heavy trucks and pickups in facilities located in the USA, China, Japan and India. Today the company has manufacturing facilities located around the world and boasts several major automotive corporations as their clients, including Ford and Toyota.

Industrial buildings of this type are rarely a model for workplace innovation. They are typically a direct, and often nefarious programmatic response to the function inside with little consideration for the occupants needs. The approach to this project was to preserve the integrity of a high bay industrial facility and program, while providing a model environment for the users and visitors.

A saw-toothed roof draws from the geometry of old factories and the surrounding Monterrey Mountains. The angled elements of the roof provide abundant natural daylight to the spaces below at the building’s northernmost elevations. By modulating space and light thru a fractured roof geometry, the building is able to maintain a rational plan to meet the rigorous requirements of the program, while providing a strong connection to the landscape both visually and
metaphorically.

The second major feature of the building is the perforated metal skin that clads the entire façade. The custom aluminum skin is both perforated and etched. It incorporates interplay of solid and void, orchestrating areas of both light and shadow, while limiting views into the research areas, necessary to protect proprietary trade secrets. Thus, the industrial program has been transformed from a black box environment to a light filled space with a strong visual connection to the
outside. Each of these strategies and materials, exploit the potential for performance and sensibility while achieving a rich and interesting sensory and aesthetic experience.

Programmatically, the building is divided into two volumes – warehouse/labs and offices functions. The upper story of the offices cantilever over the lower story to the west and is clad in a highly perforated metal skin and is the main entry facade. The lower story is mainly glazed and open to reveal portions of the research laboratory, machine room and other industrial functions not requiring visually security. From the exterior, the warehouse appears to float lightly over the
mechanical and intellectual heart of the program, reversing the notion that an industrial building should be solid and protected. Rather, the building seems very open and is intended to feel vulnerable revealing parts of its inner program to public view.

The main entry of the building is located at the northwest corner under the cantilevered volume. It is flanked by a sunken garden to the north, which is overlooked by the surrounding offices. The garden connects to the adjacent water reclamation wetland for the entire PITT campus. A large operable door located off the entry in the main public space opens to the garden outside.

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Architect: Brooks+Scarpa

Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow

architecture Project house moscow Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow Speaking a clear and autonomous architectural language, House N completed by studio 4a Architekten in Moscow is an original re-interpretation of the existing building initially constructed in the 1990s. The clients requested a bright and spacious residence that would accommodate a family of four, as well as numerous art objects in a living area of 350 square meters. An impressive addition was envisioned by: a generously glazed structural shell with a front ramp creating a new, eye-catching entrance.
design Project house moscow Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow The house interior has also undergone a powerful transformation: “Since the conversion, the different areas of the entrance level merge smoothly into each other. The original floor plan structure, which was previously divided into small sections, was eliminated through the removal of non-supporting walls. An open-plan interior landscape with a living and dining area, fireplace and kitchen now forms the focal point of the house. This communal area exudes a pleasant air of spaciousness with great freedom of movement. An air space with an open staircase links the ground floor with the upper levels”. Most of the interiors of this residence (initially discovered on Plusmood) offer a splendid view across the gardens that cover an area of 2,500 square meters! [Photography credits: 4a Architekten]

4a Haus N Moskau Panorama1 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow House N 4 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow   House N 6 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow
exterior Project house moscow Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow 4a Haus N Moskau 2941 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow   Project house moscow 4a architekten 4 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow Project house moscow 4a architekten 5 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow Project house moscow 4a architekten 6 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow House N 3 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow House N 1 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow House N 2 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow  Project house moscow 4a architekten 8 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow Project house moscow 4a architekten 7 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow   Project house moscow 4a architekten 9 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow Project house moscow 4a architekten 10 Bold Modern Architecture Details Adorning House N in Moscow

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Glass Closets: Only Neatniks Need Apply

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So much for hiding everything behind closed doors. Even die-hard hoarders may be forgiven for falling for these ravishing glass-walled closets. Part of its Fall/Winter 2013 collection is Danish brand By Nord’s sparkling wardrobe, all-glass, down to the floor, and framed in wood. And the California concept store Graye’s extravagantly-sized glass closet system, outfitted with drawers and compartments, is well suited to the obsessively organized. When storage is designed to be this dazzling, practicality seems wholly beside the point.

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Images: By Nord; Graye

Aidlin Darling Design Receives ASLA’s 2013 Professional Award

San Francisco-based Aidlin Darling Design has received the 2013 Professional Award for residential design from the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) for their work on the Sonoma Spa Retreat in Northern California’s wine country. The project started with reclaiming an overgrown hillside, revitalizing it with a series of paths that preserved its natural features, and then integrating an outdoor kitchen, solar heated pool and recreational areas. For more information on the project and the award, which evaluates context, design value and sustainability, click here.

Video: Firminy: José Oubrerie / 32BNY and Spirit of Space

Click here to view the embedded video.

32BNY in collaboration with Spirit of Space has released its fifth videopolemic, entitled Firminy: José Oubrerie. In this video José Oubrerie, a French architect and protégé of Le Corbusier, currently teaching at the Knowlton School of Architecture at Ohio State University, remembers his time working for Corbu, working on the Church in Firminy.

32BNY was launched in February 2013 as a website dedicated to the potential of cinematic architectural discourse. Previous videopolemics included Steven Holl and Sanford Kwinter on Lebbeus Woods, Vito Acconci on Art and Architecture, Drawing as Thought, and Existential Sensitivity: Jeffrey Kipnis and Steven Holl. Although 32BNY admit they do not know what the terms ‘cinematic architectural discourse’, or ‘videopolemic’ mean, they are undeterred from their exploration. You can find out more about them and their work on their website.

Marfa weeHouse / Alchemy Architects + Geoffrey Warner + AIA

Architects: Alchemy Architects, Geoffrey Warner, AIA
Location: , TX,
Area: 440 sqm
Year: 2007
Photographs: Scott Ervin

From the architect. This weeHouse and its cool, calming interior serves as a simple 440 SF retreat space on the fairly remote site outside a small arts colony in West Texas. It is designed to be the first of three weeHouse modules that are planned for the site.

The module arrived complete with an outdoor shed (housing w/d + hot water heater) and a fully finished interior and exterior, leaving only utility hookups, decks and sun-shielding canopies to be installed on- site. A stepped foundation provides a proud platform for sweeping views of an amazing landscape.

Marfa weeHouse / Alchemy Architects + Geoffrey Warner + AIA © Scott Ervin Marfa weeHouse / Alchemy Architects + Geoffrey Warner + AIA © Scott Ervin Marfa weeHouse / Alchemy Architects + Geoffrey Warner + AIA © Scott Ervin Marfa weeHouse / Alchemy Architects + Geoffrey Warner + AIA © Scott Ervin Marfa weeHouse / Alchemy Architects + Geoffrey Warner + AIA © Scott Ervin Marfa weeHouse / Alchemy Architects + Geoffrey Warner + AIA © Scott Ervin Marfa weeHouse / Alchemy Architects + Geoffrey Warner + AIA © Scott Ervin Marfa weeHouse / Alchemy Architects + Geoffrey Warner + AIA © Scott Ervin Marfa weeHouse / Alchemy Architects + Geoffrey Warner + AIA © Scott Ervin Marfa weeHouse / Alchemy Architects + Geoffrey Warner + AIA © Scott Ervin Marfa weeHouse / Alchemy Architects + Geoffrey Warner + AIA Floor Plan

Join me on a Google+ Hangout on Architectural Presentations

Novedge is hosting a Google+ Hangout on Wednesday, October 9th at 11am as part of their "How to Succeed in Architecture" series and I'll be one of the people presenting. You can RSVP on this page and join us. The whole thing will be streamed live on YouTube as well.

What it's about: 

Presenting your ideas to a prospective client is a crucial step towards gaining new business. In this episode of our Architecture Hangout Series, we will talk to three architects about their different approaches to pitching projects to new and current clients. From using an iPad, to creating renderings and 3D printed models, join us to learn how to be more effective in your interactions.

I'll be presenting some new ideas I'm exploring for upcoming presentations including augmented reality, 3d printing and realtime 3d visualization. I'm not the only presenter either - there's Marica McKeel and Emily Bello as well, so I'm hoping to pick up on their tips as well.

If you want to be more powerful and effective in your presentations, join us to learn new tips and techniques to better express your ideas and connect with your clients.

 

AA Students “Amplify the Forest”

Marking the Forest, now in its second year, is a ten-day summer course by the Architectural Association. Set in a managed forest in central Oregon, it aims to engage students with the forest through thoughtful architectural intervention.

This year’s project, “The Amplifier,” explores the possibilities of enhancing and amplifying aspects of the forest that may not have been initially apparent. The structure, built using timber from the forest, acts as a passage into the forest, taking visitors from a clearly laid gravel path into the wild beyond.

The program is a collaboration between the AA, the University of Oregon School of Architecture, and the Bauman Family Tree Farm. It is set to run for five years (2012-2017) and is open to interested architecture/design students and professionals worldwide.

AA Students "Amplify the Forest" Courtesy of Stewart Dodd and the Architectural Association AA Students "Amplify the Forest" Courtesy of Stewart Dodd and the Architectural Association AA Students "Amplify the Forest" Courtesy of Stewart Dodd and the Architectural Association AA Students "Amplify the Forest" Courtesy of Stewart Dodd and the Architectural Association AA Students "Amplify the Forest" Courtesy of Stewart Dodd and the Architectural Association AA Students "Amplify the Forest" Courtesy of Stewart Dodd and the Architectural Association AA Students "Amplify the Forest" Courtesy of Stewart Dodd and the Architectural Association AA Students "Amplify the Forest" Courtesy of Stewart Dodd and the Architectural Association AA Students "Amplify the Forest" Courtesy of Stewart Dodd and the Architectural Association AA Students "Amplify the Forest" Courtesy of Stewart Dodd and the Architectural Association

Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos

Architects: Alberto Zavala Arquitectos
Location: San Benito, Yucatan, Mexico
Architect In Charge: Alberto Zavala
Project Team: Alfonso Canche, Hiram Bolio, Edair Puerto, Karim Gonzalez
Area: 416 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of Alberto Zavala Arquitectos

From the architect. These two beach homes were conceived having in mind sustainable and eco-freindly design principles fulfilling at the same time practical issues in this tropical coast.

The foundation is based on concrete piles to reduce the impact on the terrain and to integrate subtly to the site, protecting the properties in case of eventual hurricanes. The built footprint is at a 20% of the total lot area with the intention of impacting the least possible, respecting the most of the coastal dune. The floor plan solution is very compact and practical at the same time. The different facades are treated according to the orientation, having an interesting display on the south, based on semi-open and closed volumes of concrete and bamboo structures that act as solar radiation and privacy controllers.

These areas to the south where the services are located work as a thermal cushion and are packed for and maintenance convenience. As opposed the north facade has a transparente treatment to take advantage of the views. Large eaves protect from summer solar incidence and rain. The bioclimatic design is of great importance due to conceiving the architecture as an autonomous structure with excellent environmental behavior.

Cross ventilation is present in all areas using the staircase volume as a “vertical lung” of injection and extraction of wind.

Concerning materials selected these were considering low maintenance and high durability through time, eliminating the use of painting, and instead incorporating an integral finish based on an antique mayan technique “chukum” of excellent construction and visual properties.

The first floor level acts as an open space, integrating movable wood and sisal panels to subdivide and use as convenience. To avoid contamination of the soil ecological septic tanks were included, for sewage treatment, generating at the end of the process areas of coastal endemic vegetation.

The dwellings were conceived to be discovered, having all main spaces views to the ocean, and incorporating the concept of “magic cube”: an exterior pool space elevated on piles in a semi-open virtual cube of concrete and bamboo, creating an area dedicated to the delight of the senses: water, light, shadow, texture, horizon views…

Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Courtesy of Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Courtesy of Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Courtesy of Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Courtesy of Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Courtesy of Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Courtesy of Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Courtesy of Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Courtesy of Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Courtesy of Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Courtesy of Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Courtesy of Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Plan Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Plan Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Plan Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Plan Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Section Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Section Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Section Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Elevation Dunas 22 / Alberto Zavala Arquitectos Elevation

Soft Lights by Rainer Mutsch

Austrian designer Rainer Mutsch has created a series of lights made from fiber cement for manufacturer Molto Luce.

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Description

Each individual luminaire shade is moulded manually from soft fibre cement: the shades get their stability through their slightly rippled geometry which eventually leads to a minimum of material thickness.

Fibre cement, originally developed by Eternit, is produced eco-friendly from natural resources like water and cellulose fibers. The material is highly durable and non-flammable.

The Soft series consists of a wall light, a bar pendant light and a large pendant light.

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Designer: Rainer Mutsch
Manufacturer: Molto Luce

Modules and Systems: Architecture for Social Inclusion – A Lecture by Giancarlo Mazzanti

‘Colombia: Transformed/Architecture=Politics’ is an exhibition currently taking place at the Center for Architecture. In relation to the exhibition, Colombian architect Giancarlo Mazzanti will be giving a lecture on architecture for social inclusion, Friday, October 11 at 8:30am.

More information after the break.

The buildings shown in Colombia Transformed/Architecture=Politics aim to evolve into a means of social inclusion in order to help improve lifestyle factors and financial competitiveness in Colombia’s deteriorated environments, thus promoting social well-being and building a fairer and more sustainable society based on architecture.

We believe that architecture’s worth is based not only in itself but in what it produces – in its capacity to perform more so than in its capacity to represent. This is why we are interested in architecture that is defined by what it does and not by its substance.

We are interested in inducing actions, happenings and relationships. This will allow us to develop forms, patterns or open material organizations that act in the construction of social actions, not through the introduction of authoritarian, functional schemes, but rather through the stimulus of new everyday interactions; an architecture that is capable of generating new behaviors and relationships, encouraging people to behave, mentally and physically, in ways they would have never thought possible.

Giancarlo Mazzanti (1963, Barranquilla, Colombia) is an Architect of the Javeriana University in Bogotá (1987) with a postgraduate in Industrial design from the University of Florence in Italy (1991). He has taught in several Colombian universities and at Princeton University in 2012. He has been invited to dictate conferences at Pratt, Yale, Berkeley, University of Valencia, Monterrey, Buenos Aires, and more. Amongst some of his most relevant projects are the Convention Center, Biblioteca España and the South American Games Coliseum in Medellín. He has received several national and international awards and honors. In 2006, he won the public space award at the XX Colombian Architecture Biennial and in 2008 he was the winner of the Ibero-American Biennial in the category of Best Architectural Work (Lisbon, ) and the Panamerican Architecture Biennial in the category of Architectural Design (Quito, Ecuador). In 2010, he was the winner of the Global Award for Sustainable Architecture. His work is also exhibited in MoMA’s permanent collection. Social values are at the core of Mazzanti’s architecture projects. He searches for projects that empower transformations and build communities.

Title: Modules and Systems: Architecture for Social Inclusion – A Lecture by Giancarlo Mazzanti
Website: http://cfa.aiany.org/index.php?section=calendar&evtid=5982
Organizers: Center for Architecture
From: Fri, 11 Oct 2013 08:30
Until: Fri, 11 Oct 2013 10:30
Venue: Center for Architecture
Address: 536 LaGuardia Place, , NY 10012, USA