Design Filters: 2Modern’s Instagram Feed

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We’ll admit that nothing is safe from our Instagram filters. Whether walking on the street, rushing through an airport, or perusing the aisles of a favorite shop; below ground or above the clouds, we always keep our eyes wide open. 2Modern’s Instagram feed is a window into our design-centric worldview, be it our latest blog posts, our website offerings, our home turf or the cities we pass through. Follow us at Instagram.com/2Modern. You’ll get a glimpse of what we see—and what you’ve been missing.
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Composite Building / Aedas

Aedas has recently unveiled this design for a serviced apartment building in Hong Kong. Situated in the neighborhood of Mongkok, one of the most densely populated areas on the planet, the building is squeezed into what the architects refer to as a “challengingly small” site of 614 square meters. More images and description after the break.

The design is informed by the local architectural character: in the post-war years, many people in this dense high-rise neighborhood extended their apartments with illegal iron balconies, offering them views, outside space and a place to grow a small garden.

interpreted these traditional features into their contemporary facade with irregular protrusions and a green wall on the lower floors, offering the best possible views for residents and welcome greenery for pedestrians. The building also steps back on the upper floors to provide a breathing space among the high rises.

Architects: Aedas
Location: 78-88 Sai Yee Street, 78-88 Sai Yee Street, Mong Kok,
Area: 5514.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of Aedas

Composite Building / Aedas Courtesy of Aedas Composite Building / Aedas Courtesy of Aedas Composite Building / Aedas Courtesy of Aedas Composite Building / Aedas Courtesy of Aedas Composite Building / Aedas Courtesy of Aedas Composite Building / Aedas Courtesy of Aedas

SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition

The competition isn’t over yet as the jury for the Central Mosque of Pristina Competition has announced two second place prizes and no winner. Organized by the Islamic Community of Kosovo, the competition seeks to create a place “where understanding, humanity, tolerance, respect and sincere love shall be cultivated.” Slovenian firm SADAR+VUGA was one of the two teams awarded second prize with their project 21PR22. Follow us after the break to learn more.

The Architect’s Description:

The proposal is related to the architectural significance of the old Sultan Mehmet II Mosque in Pristina, which was a design ‘prototype’. Main architectural characteristics as well as the impressive proportions of the old Mosque, was studied and interpreted into a new fresh dynamic, yet balanced development of the mosque’s volume and massing in its surroundings.

At the old Sultan Mehmet II Mosque, an octagonal belt transits the square of the rectangular volume to the circle of the dome at the top, whereas the volumetric transition of the new mosque is much smoother: the rectangular base volume, a lower belt, narrows towards its top and slightly rotates to accommodate a middle belt. The narrowing and rotation of the middle belt continues to the upper belt and further up to the dome. The minaret rises up from the corner, to the right of the entrance.

Three slightly rotated massive belts and a circular dome make up the mosque. There is spacing between the belts, as well as between the dome and the upper belt allowing diffuse daylight to flood into the interior of the dome. It seems as if the three belts and the dome would be suspended by the warm daylight, which creates a very specific atmosphere inside the Mosque.

The interior is filled with a homogenous light, penetrating into the space from spacing between the belts and through the windows of the lower belt. Light spills in from above, from all sides, from the floor to the base of the dome. Two sets of narrow windows on the lower belt allows sunrays to penetrate the mosque. The lower set of windows touches the ground floor of the Mosque and enables viewing towards outside.

The Mosque rises above an 8m high podium, which, due to the height difference of the terrain, is partly buried. The podium contains two levels of rooms for the ancillary activities of the mosque: ablution, social and education center, and administration offices with the imam’s apartment on the upper level and a big conference hall surrounded by bazaar-like organized shopping on the lower level.

The grand portico consisting of an artificial stone-cladded colonnade in front of the main entrance to the mosque is developed as an extension of the mosque’s lower belt. The cannelure-shaped colonnade creates an in-between space between the ‘carved-in’ entrance and the gathering plaza on the entrance plateau.

The screens continue from the podium’s lower level along the podium wall on the northern side and rises up to the entrance plateau. Here the screens embrace the entrance garden that appears due to the Kiblah’s orientation of 38 degrees in relation to the urban context and the surrounding buildings. The lower part of the podium extends on the same level to the big lawn – a large square green area, lifted from the surroundings. This is a main gathering place for prayers, citizens and visitors. This is the place to relax and play, to contemplate or to celebrate.

From here, the Mosque appears in all its own grandeur.

Architects: SADAR + VUGA
Location: Pristina
Architect In Charge: SVA (Jurij Sadar, Boštjan Vuga, Peter Sovinc, Andreas Cesarini, Jure Sadar, Manuel Garcia)
Design Team: M Studio (Merita Behruli) & SADAR + VUGA
Area: 41.803 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: SADAR + VUGA

SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Mandatory 2. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Interior. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Mosque Model. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Entrance 1. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Mandatory 1. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Mandatory 3. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Entrance 2. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Mosque Model. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Mosque Model. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Mosque Model. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Mosque Model. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Mosque Program. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Design Elements. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Mosque Elevations. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition GF. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition G. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition 1. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition 2. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition 3. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Site Plan. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition SectionAA. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Section Model. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition SectionBB. Image © SADAR + VUGA SADAR+VUGA Shares Second in Central Mosque of Pristina Competition Section Detail. Image © SADAR + VUGA

Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners

Architects: AEC Krymow & Partners
Location: Gdynia, Poland
Architect In Charge: Georg Krymow
Area: 13,055 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners

Building And Executive Project: Georg Krymow, Daniel Cabanek, Joanna Rogóyska, Karol Zdanuczyk, Michał Reduta, Patrycja Marcinkowska, Krzysztof Starzyk, Dominik Dratwa, Marcin Wesoły, Jacek Pietruszka, Andrzej Sobótka, Ireneusz Sosnowski, Artur Bronisz
Supervision: Georg Krymow, Daniel Cabanek
General Contractor: Warbud S.A.

From the architect. The international architectural design competition of the Pomeranian Science and Technology Park in Gdynia was won by AEC Krymow & Partners, an architectural office from Warsaw.

The current area of the Technology Park is more than 80 thousand sqm. Inside the ultra-modern building complex there are offices, laboratories, workshops, conference spaces, whilst  on the ground floor there is space for dining, shopping and other commercial services.

During the design process of the buildings, the architects were inspired by polish modernist architecture of Gdynia of the 1920s and 30s. The rounded parts of the facade are especially associated with the historic architecture of Gdynia.

Five blocks, accommodating offices, are merged through communication lines of stairwells and elevators, whilst the facades is entirely made of glass.

The implemented double-skinned facade system was custom developed to give the interior a high level of sound and energy-saving thermal insulation.

The interior design project is also a result of AEC Krymow  & Partners office’s work. The interiors are designed in such a way so that there is no further need for the construction to be built over. The structural design itself creates the arrangement of inside. Concrete walls have no plaster and rooms have no suspended ceilings. The main materials used in the interior is aluminum, glass, concrete and steel. This raw and industrial arrangement was softened by the use of wood.

The architecture of this building is energy efficient as it uses heat exchangers and heat recovery systems, so neither heat nor energy are wasted.

Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Courtesy of AEC Krymow & Partners Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Floor Plan Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Floor Plan Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Section Pomeranian / AEC Krymow & Partners Section

The Most Amazing (Unknown) Buildings In the World

What makes a building world-famous? The answer is most likely some combination of magnificence, size, and historical importance. But it’s far from an exact science, and many of the world’s most impressive architectural landmarks are therefore not very well known outside of their own locations.

Thankfully, this post on Quora sheds some light on the lesser-known architectural landmarks on the planet. Read on to find out which marvels you may have missed…

The first thing which you might notice is that one part of the world is extremely over-represented on this list: India accounts for about half of all the world’s “little known landmarks” on the list. ArchDaily has previously discussed the forgotten and neglected state of India’s stepwells, and one of the largest and grandest, Chand Baori, tops the Quora list. There are also Indian temples such as the Airavateswarar Temple and palaces such as the one in Kanadukathan.

Another trend in “forgotten architecture” is for Eastern European landmarks, whose history is heavily affected by the area’s socialist history. There is a particularly interesting history of Stari Most, a bridge that was the namesake for the town of Mostar in Herzegovina. Built in 1566 and destroyed in 1993 in the Bosnian War (part of the breakup of Yugoslavia), the bridge was finally rebuilt in 2004 and is once again the center of the town’s community.

Also from Eastern Europe is Romania‘s Parliament Palace. Built in the 1980s by Communist dictator Nicholae Ceausescu, you would think this would be hard to forget about; it is generally regarded as one of the largest buildings in the world (it’s floor area is only exceeded by the Pentagon in the USA and the recently opened Century Global Center in Chengdu). Built in a neoclassical style from a million cubic meters of marble, it may still be the world’s heaviest building.

Finally, there are buildings which, whilst impressive, are perhaps forgotten because they are overshadowed by far more famous twins. This is the case for Choquequirao (“The Other Machu Picchu”), Taj of the Deccan (“a poor man’s Taj Mahal”) and the “Great Wall of India” at Kumbhalgarh.

Are there any other little-known architectural wonders that you know of? Let us know in the comments below.

Lodge on the Lake Exhibition

In light of the strong responses to their Lodge on the Lake competition, organized in collaboration with the University of Canberra and won by Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts and Jack Davies in May, the Gallery of Australian Design is hosting an of the submissions to the competition, including models of the entries created specially created for the .

The competition itself was organized to mark the centenary of Canberra being named Australia’s new capital. Entrants were asked to design a new house for the Australian Prime Minister, to replace the current building on Adelaide Avenue. This building has been home to 16 of ’s 27 Prime Ministers since it was completed in 1927 as part of the new capital city.

Though the competition was for a design to replace the building, this is in fact an attempt to save the current Prime Minister’s home; over the years the role of the building has evolved, and this has resulted in a number of extensions and security features being added to the building which are not sympathetic to the original classical design style. By proposing a new home for the Prime Minister, the competition is suggesting a way to preserve the building as an important monument to the country’s last 100 years of history, as well as replacing a building which is no longer suited to its function.

The winner of the competition was commended for their design which “reflects the informal nature of contemporary Australian lifestyles and architecture, while providing attractive larger spaces for public gatherings”. The exhibition of the best entries is intended to raise awareness and public support for the idea of a new Prime Minister’s residence, as it is generally acknowledged that the current building is no longer fit for purpose.

Title: Lodge on the Lake Exhibition
Website: http://www.gad.org.au/exhibitions.php
Organizers: University of Canberra, Gallery of Australian Design
From: Thu, 15 Aug 2013 00:00
Until: Sat, 16 Nov 2013 00:00
Venue: Gallery of Australian Design
Address: Queen Elizabeth Terrace, Parkes ACT 2600, Australia

Lodge on the Lake Exhibition The winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Image of the exhibition. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Image of the exhibition. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Model of the winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Ground Floor Plan of the winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Lodge on the Lake Exhibition The winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Lodge on the Lake Exhibition The winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Lodge on the Lake Exhibition Site Plan of the winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies Lodge on the Lake Exhibition The winning entry. Image © Henry Stephens, Nick Roberts, Jack Davies

Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates

Architects: Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates
Location: ,
Architect In Charge: Riitta Id, Maritta Kukkonen
Area: 18,300 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Pawel Paniczko, Photoroom.pl

Collaborators: Jukka Savolainen, Mirja Sillanpää, Miguel Freitas Silva
Markus Wikar
Architectural Collaborators In Poland: Kuryłowicz & Associates, Stefan Kuryłowicz, 
Ewa Kuryłowicz, Paweł Grodzicki, Marcin Ferenc, Tomasz Kopeć, Michal Gratkowski

From the architect. An international architectural competition for the Museum of the History of Polish Jews was organised in spring 2005. The first discussions regarding the plan to build such a museum had taken place ten years earlier. During those years it had become clear that there is a need for a dedicated museum as public interest towards Jewish history and culture had increased. The selection of the participants of the architectural competition was based on expressions of interest. The finalists included 11 studios, including Studio Daniel Libeskind, Kengo Kuma & Associates, Zvi Hecker Architects, Peter Eisenman and David Chipperfield.

The proposal “Yum Suf”, “Sea of Reeds”, by Lahdelma & Mahlamäki Architects was declared winner in summer 2005. The design process of the building continued until July 2008 when final design documents were released. The construction commenced in July 2009. The building is scheduled to be completed by May of 2013. The museum will function as a multifunctional centre for the research and exhibition of Jewish heritage, education and culture.

The main permanent exhibition takes place under the main hall in a large exhibition space of 5000 m2. Special built-in milieus will present the different aspects of the history of the Polish Jews. The main task of the exhibition is to present different phases and forms of Jewish culture starting from medieval times to present day – the holocaust is only one of the main themes of the exhibition.

Warsaw has been one of the most important cities for Jews; before the Second World War there were half a million Jewish inhabitants in the city.The site of the new museum is located in the Willy Brandt Park, one kilometre from the old city centre of Warsaw, which was rebuilt after the war. The history of the park is tragic as it was part of the Jewish ghetto during the war.

Adjacent to the new museum is the memorial of the uprising in the Jewish ghetto. The memorial has been an important element in the architecture of the museum. The proportions of the plaza in front of the memorial and the museum have been carefully considered. The shape of the museum building is rectangular. The facades will be covered with glass and copper panels.

The name of the competition proposal symbolically refers to the architecture of the main hall. The inspiration for the space has been the legends of the Old Testament, although at the same time forms of the hall refer to the universal and abstract phenomena of nature. The main hall is the most important element in the architecture of the building; a pure and silent space introducing the museum to the visitors.

Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Photoroom.pl Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Photoroom.pl Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Photoroom.pl Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Photoroom.pl Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Photoroom.pl Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Photoroom.pl Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Photoroom.pl Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates © Pawel Paniczko Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates Floor Plan Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates First Floor Plan Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates Ground Floor Plan Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates Third Floor Plan Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates Site Plan Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates Elevation Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates Elevation Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates Elevation Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates Elevation Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews / Lahdelma & Mahlamäki + Kuryłowicz & Associates Section

Live Blog – Walid Raad and Theaster Gates in Conversation, with Mohsen Mostafavi, "On Art and Cities"

Hi Archinect!

I'm co-live-blogging tonight with Allison Green, a first-year student in the GSD's Master of Urban Planning program who is also starting to blog at Archinect.

From the GSD website:

Theaster Gates, an artist trained as an urban planner and sculptor, has developed a practice that includes space development, object making, performance, and critical engagement with many publics. Among recent projects, he was a participating artist in Documenta 13 in Kassel, Germany, for "12 Ballads for Huguenot House." Gates, a 2011 Loeb Fellow, is a Creative Time Global Resident for 2012–13 and was honored by the Wall Street Journal as an Arts Innovator of the Year in 2012.

Walid Raad is a New York-based artist and associate professor of art at The Cooper Union. His works include The Atlas Group, a fifteen-year project about the history of Lebanon between 1989 and 2004; the ongoing projects Scratching on Things I Could Disavow and Sweet Talk: Commissions (Beirut); and several bo...

Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis

Some days ago we featured BIG’s Danish National Maritime Museum, the 17,500 sqm below ground museum. We now have more photos taken by photographer George Messaritakis. You can check them all after the break.

Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG by George Messaritakis © George Messaritakis

Social Green House / Darkitectura

Architects: Darkitectura
Location: Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro, Mexico
Design Team: Julio Juárez, Hugo Maldonado, Luis Arteaga
Area: 85 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Julio Juárez

From the architect. Social Green House, is an 85 sqm prototype for affordable housing that has as main objective to offer greater value to the average cost of occupancy in its segment. It was built in an 8 x 16 meters area on the outskirts of Querétaro, ideal city for the implementation of this open house. The project generated in an orthogonal box has an extraordinary 3.20 meter mezzanine height, improving conventional spaces by adding in more than a meter the usual mezzanine.

This mezzanine is only the first of three steps to make a sustainable project and avoid the use of air conditioning, the second is the implementation of a green roof that provides shade on the entire slab and the third is composed of four facade louvers that protect from sun the polarized glasses that go from floor to ceiling.

The double facade louvers completely fold down and combined with the aluminum sliding doors allows the interior space to fully disclosed to the outside, making the space flow and much more versatile and suitable for social and recreational activities. The house has been builted with a completely traditional construction process , no element needs a highly skilled workforce to do it, the materials are the same as always , block walls , beam and vault slabs, folded steel plate stairs, engineered flooring , gypsum plaster, aluminum windows, which makes this approach economically viable within the parameters of social housing.

Finally the slab top with green roof gives us another 85 sqm that can be customized, either as an outdoor terrace, workout deck, sustainable garden, etc., raising substantially the life quality of its members.

Social Green House is adaptable to larger or smaller plots , intended as a fresh alternative to trite social interest housing developments , the houses are able to upgrade to a second level generating a simple but showy set of volumes that is accentuated when the louvers in the blink up make a pattern along the street repetition .

Social Green House / Darkitectura © Julio Juárez Social Green House / Darkitectura © Julio Juárez Social Green House / Darkitectura © Julio Juárez Social Green House / Darkitectura © Julio Juárez Social Green House / Darkitectura © Julio Juárez Social Green House / Darkitectura © Julio Juárez Social Green House / Darkitectura © Julio Juárez Social Green House / Darkitectura © Julio Juárez Social Green House / Darkitectura © Julio Juárez Social Green House / Darkitectura © Julio Juárez Social Green House / Darkitectura © Julio Juárez Social Green House / Darkitectura © Julio Juárez Social Green House / Darkitectura Roof Floor Plan Social Green House / Darkitectura Ground Floor Plan Social Green House / Darkitectura Section Social Green House / Darkitectura Section Social Green House / Darkitectura Render Social Green House / Darkitectura Render Social Green House / Darkitectura Render Social Green House / Darkitectura Render

Binimelis-Barahona House / Polidura Talhouk Arquitectos

Architects: Polidura Talhouk Arquitectos
Location: Chicureo, Colina, Santiago Metropolitan Region, Chile
Project Architects: Antonio Polidura, Marco Polidura, Pablo Talhouk
Structures: Daniel Stagno
Project Area: 260 sqm
Project Year: 2007
Photography: Aryeh Kornfeld

Construction: Costructora Los Robles
Site Area: 950 sqm
Materiality: Stone, slate, wood and concrete

From the architect. The commission was for a home for a young couple with two children, located on a plot of 950 m2 in the Reserva subdivision in Chicureo, in the Colina commune.

The terrain presented three conditions that determined the operations that define the project. Being a triangular site on a corner, building setbacks left a buildable area at the center of the site. A steep slope of about 40% and finally, the orientation of sunlight and views of the valley.

The operation consists of separating the program into two overlapping volumes, placed parallel to the direction of the slope so that in section, the two bodies are related to the site.

The lower volume is buried in the ground and adopts a materiality which enables it to be perceived as a base blended into the terrain and the stone cairns enclosing the plot. This volume contains the bedrooms with access to a garden which is located over the lower street level.

The upper volume, as abstract as possible, aims to differentiate itself from the site and base. For this purpose, a very pure geometry is designed, and the volume is clad in a single material with an industrial look and a neutral color (slate gray). The break of this volume is to avoid the views of the quarry, the views are concentrated to the valley.

This volume houses the most public spaces, and has access to a courtyard at the level of the upper street, through a single large void.

Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk © Aryeh Kornfeld Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk Site Plan Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk Site Plan - First Level Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk Site Plan - Second Level Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk Second Level Floor Plan Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk First Level Floor Plan Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk Section C Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk Section D Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk Section E Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk Detail I Casa Binimelis-Barahona / Polidura + Talhouk Detail II

Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau

Architects: Anne Sophie Goneau
Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
Year: 2013
Photographs: Adrien Williams

From the architect. The project is the design of a 1,280 sq.ft. condo, located on the ground floor of a triplex in Montreal. The mandate was to divide each living area in order to maximize while maintaining the architectural integrity of the existing location, each room with natural light. The concept was to highlight the raw materials, discovered during the demolition (brick wall, wall hemlock and steel structure), in order to communicate their material, their relief and color environment.

Upon entering the hall is semi-closed hall, so that it has an overview of the condo. The open kitchen is the focal point of the space; it unfolds on the dining room and living room, where the master bedroom fits. It is bounded by a glass wall which preserves the view of the bare brick; an archaeological reminder wanting to highlight the existing raw materials as an exhibitor showcase. A green velvet sofa, two vintage chairs and a bookshelf that leans against the bedroom wall bound the living room.

On the ground, a radiant hot water heating system was installed under a concrete slab which was covered by a light gray epoxy and polyurethane matt finish to replicate the natural color of concrete. The primary and secondary bedrooms, as well as the bathroom, are glossy white epoxy to distinguish the private area of the common space. The steel beam, flameproof, delimits the passage area. In the corridor leading to the bathroom, a light-emitting diode was installed in the recessed ceiling for a more intimate setting, which features the original hemlock wall.

Tone on tone, glossy black kitchen cabinets and electrical appliances are blended. The cooktop with integrated sub-hood, allows maximum exposure of brick wall, the backsplash, lit by a light-emitting diode recessed in counter. The dining table becomes the visual continuity of the kitchen island. In the bathroom, custom-made stainless steel countertop and bath rectilinear shapes are stacked on each other, forming a sculptural composition. On the floor, a white epoxy and in the shower a dark grey epoxy were applied. The contrast between these two colors form a psychological boundary of two areas: one is clear and bright, the other, darker, creating a private area for the shower and toilet. The window allows natural light in the room while preserving the intimacy of the space, with a frosted film.

Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau © Adrien Williams Espace St-Denis / Anne Sophie Goneau Floor Plan