KSA Japan Day 2-3: Tokyo

KSA Japan Day 2-3: Tokyo

The tour continues. For the past 3 days, we've been exploring the city by subway, and on foot, stopping briefly in front of  each building on the itinerary, to chat a bit about the design, the architects, and the historical context. In our curbside discussions, a theme has emerged: what does it mean to be "modern" and what is the role of tradition in contemporary society? While Tokyo is (rightly) seen as a technological wonderland with its sights aimed firmly at the future, the past has been surprisingly present in our explorations.

Yesterday, we started at Asakusa, visiting the Senjo-ji temple. A buddhist temple, we compared the ornamental program and decorative painting to the relatively austere Meiji Shrine we visited on the previous day. Though the architectural traditions of the Buddhist Temple and the Shinto Shrine are not aways clearly distinct, we were able to, for now, note the relative minimalism of the Shinto shrine versus the elaboraion of ...

KSA Japan Day 2-3: Tokyo

KSA Japan Day 2-3: Tokyo

The tour continues. For the past 3 days, we've been exploring the city by subway, and on foot, stopping briefly in front of  each building on the itinerary, to chat a bit about the design, the architects, and the historical context. In our curbside discussions, a theme has emerged: what does it mean to be "modern" and what is the role of tradition in contemporary society? While Tokyo is (rightly) seen as a technological wonderland with its sights aimed firmly at the future, the past has been surprisingly present in our explorations.

Yesterday, we started at Asakusa, visiting the Senjo-ji temple. A buddhist temple, we compared the ornamental program and decorative painting to the relatively austere Meiji Shrine we visited on the previous day. Though the architectural traditions of the Buddhist Temple and the Shinto Shrine are not aways clearly distinct, we were able to, for now, note the relative minimalism of the Shinto shrine versus the elaboraion of ...

Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc

Architects: Christian de Portzamparc
Location: ,
Architect In Charge: Christian de Portzamparc
Area: 5250.0 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Erik Saillet, Max Botton

Landscape: Méristème, Régis Guignard
Site Manager: Olivier Chadebost,
Acoustics: Point d’Orgue
Light: Captain Spot, Jean-Bernard Favero-Longo, Aartill
Economist: G.V. Ingénierie

From the architect. With a view to improving wine production at Château Cheval Blanc, owners Bernard Arnault and Baron Albert Frère asked Christian de Portzamparc to design a new winery. In this vineyard shaped by man over the centuries, the architect envisioned a winery shaped like a belvedere projecting out from the château and opening onto the beautiful landscape.
Based on discussions with the director of the Château, Pierre Lurton, who has extensive experience of wine-making in concrete vats, much appreciated at Cheval Blanc, the architect designed a curved vat shaped like a tasting glass to optimize oxygenation.

Divided into 52 units with dimensions varying according to the vineyard plots, they provide a showcase for each vine, as requested by Pierre Lurton. No line here is superfluous: everything contributes to perfecting the wine-making process and the movements carried out in the winery: the geometry of the curved surfaces in molded concrete, the unique atmosphere created by the natural light descending earthwards, caressing the load-bearing shear wall surrounding the large concrete sculptures of the vat house.

The barrel winery below is like a crypt and has a totally different atmosphere, bordered by a brick moucharaby wall to facilitate natural ventilation.
Halfway between the interior and exterior, the winery is a place of transmutation and interaction with nature. This is where exceptional wine is made and where, through architecture, modernity meets centuries-old experience.

Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc © Erik Saillet Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc © Erik Saillet Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc © Erik Saillet Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc © Max Botton Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc © Erik Saillet Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc © Max Botton Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc © Erik Saillet Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc © Erik Saillet Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc © Erik Saillet Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc © Erik Saillet Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc © Erik Saillet Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc © Erik Saillet Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc © Erik Saillet Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc Floor Plan Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc Floor Plan Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc Ground Floor Plan Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc Floor Plan Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc Elevation Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc Sketch Chateau Cheval Blanc Winer / Christian de Portzamparc Detail

Padarie Cafe by CRIO Arquiteturas

CRIO Arquiteturas have recently completed Padarie, a cafe located in Porto Alegre, Brazil.

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From the architect

Established in a two stories building, this project started with three main guidelines: order, zoning and intelligent flows. The ground floor houses the customer’s area and some support facilities: the tearoom, the store, the cashier, the counter, the restrooms, a small backyard, the storage room, a small kitchen and the locker rooms and bathrooms for the staff. At the top floor we find the administration office, another storage room, the bakery, the patisserie and the cold chamber.

The original staircase was relocated to make circulation more efficient and dynamic. The service areas are all connected. The counter and the display for the breads were designed to make good use of the room below the stairs.

The tables, chairs and benches at the customer’s area were all painted in different bright colors, bringing a sense of lightness to the room. At the back, the little store and the cashier are located near de stylized saloon door that leads to the restrooms. It´s all very clean, but yet full of inspired details. At some parts of the walls the painting is a little worn, revealing the solid brick layer that lies underneath. The pillars are covered with pinus elliotti. The lighting completes the ambience, with articulated luminaries and rail spotlights. To add character and personality, the cashier and the counter were coated with rectangular white tiles.

A special mask was applied to the existing facade to provide privacy to the storage room and the office without blocking the sunlight. This solution was accomplished with a set of colored metal brises shaped like the wheat spike, the main ingredient of the bread. A wooden pergola completes the facade, limiting the outdoor sitting area. The elements to this project were designed to grant personality and a strong identity to the first Padarie shop in town.

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Architect: CRIO Arquiteturas
Photography: Marcelo Donadussi

Friendly Swedish Home With A Distinctive Design Touch In Stockholm

homeSwedish2 Friendly Swedish Home With A Distinctive Design Touch In Stockholm

This striking home located in Sweden, Stockholm found on Skeppsholmen blends the local style and charm with an industrial influence. It includes a large kitchen and living room in an open plan and three bedrooms, one of them being a mezzanine. Every part of the house is surprising in its own way. The white rooms are balanced by different colorful objects that give a playful feeling, but without compromising function and appearance. For example, the kitchen was designed using a white theme, however complemented with vivid colorful focal points that make it more interesting

homeSwedish1 Friendly Swedish Home With A Distinctive Design Touch In StockholmThe large windows let the natural light get in and add a distinctive touch and a comfortable atmosphere to the entire home. There are many simple objects that bring interest to a room and create nice contrasts that grab attention. With focus on simplicity and minimalism, this home is a warm, friendly, airy and welcoming place.

homeSwedish Friendly Swedish Home With A Distinctive Design Touch In Stockholm

homeSwedish4 Friendly Swedish Home With A Distinctive Design Touch In Stockholm

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homeSwedish6 Friendly Swedish Home With A Distinctive Design Touch In Stockholm

homeSwedish7 Friendly Swedish Home With A Distinctive Design Touch In Stockholm

homeSwedish8 Friendly Swedish Home With A Distinctive Design Touch In Stockholm

homeSwedish9 Friendly Swedish Home With A Distinctive Design Touch In Stockholm

homeSwedish10 Friendly Swedish Home With A Distinctive Design Touch In Stockholm

homeSwedish11 Friendly Swedish Home With A Distinctive Design Touch In Stockholm

homeSwedish12 Friendly Swedish Home With A Distinctive Design Touch In Stockholm

homeSwedish13 Friendly Swedish Home With A Distinctive Design Touch In Stockholm

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The Illinois School of Architecture Announces New Website

, one of the oldest and largest schools of architecture in the United States, is proud to announce the launch of its new website.

Since the initiation of its architectural curriculum in 1867, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has consistently broken new ground in the education of architects. Like the School’s founder Nathan Ricker, we look beyond current fashion, striving to leverage technical virtuosity in the service of performative design, aesthetic expression, and service to society.

More after the break.

Our diverse and accomplished faculty offer students a strong intellectual foundation informed by our position within a top-tier research university. Students explore theoretical and conceptual positions informed by history and technology, and envision creative design solutions for real-world settings. The School’s degree programs include the NAAB-accredited professional Master of Architecture degree, as well as Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies, Master of Science in Architectural Studies, PhD, and joint degree programs such as M.Arch + MUP, M.Arch + MBA, and M.Arch + M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering.

The Illinois School of Architecture develops graduates who are highly sought after in architecture and allied professions for their expertise in design + technical integration. We invite you to learn more at www.arch.illinois.edu/.

Cold Air Is Dry Air

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Relative humidity is what everyone likes to talk about. It gets the attention, but it can be a bit confusing, especially when the temperatures drop. For example, at one point yesterday, we had a relative humidity (RH) of 97%. Seems humid, eh? It's not really. Not in terms of how much water vapor is actually in the air, that is. The psychrometric chart below shows how this works.

psychrometric chart humidity temperature 600

The two points I've highlighted on the chart are:
  • Point A: 32° F, 100% RH
  • Point B: 70° F, 20% RH
They're connected by the arrow, indicating that when that cold, seemingly humid, outdoor air leaks into a home by infiltration, it warms up. Let's assume that the mass of air leaking in doesn't gain or lose any water vapor molecules along the way.

The psychrometric chart rocks!

On the psychrometric chart, an unchanging number of water molecules means the movement is purely horizontal. The temperature changes but the absolute humidity does not. But as that mass of air warms up, the relative humidity does change.
Henry Gifford wearing his psycrhometric chart T-shirt
Continue reading "Cold Air Is Dry Air"

Rectangular Box House in Brasilia Revealing Inspiring Decorating Ideas

architecture Box House  Rectangular Box House in Brasilia Revealing Inspiring Decorating IdeasWhen planning the Box House in Brasilia, the architects at 1:1 arquitetura:design mainly aimed for a “new way to occupy space and form”. The result is a compact and welcoming home, displaying a simple rectangular geometry: “The main volume was created as a concrete box, with enough personality; the entries of the box are marked with a rusty steel form. Inside the building we used a fun mix of textures, colors and Brazilian design furniture from Marcus Ferreira, Paulo Alves and Aristeu Pires”, explained the project developers.
design Box House Rectangular Box House in Brasilia Revealing Inspiring Decorating IdeasAll interiors are filled with personality and let out an overall sense of comfort and serenity. The neutral color finishes were also brought inside for a harmonious uniformity, yet here they are remarkably complemented by creative patterns and bold decorative items. The living zone connects with the courtyard through floor to ceiling glass doors, allowing fresh air and plenty of natural light inside when needed.  [Photos by: Cesar Edgard]
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Dezeen’s A-Zdvent calendar: Arata Isozaki

Advent-calendar-Arata-Izozaki

Letter I stands for Japanese architect Arata Isozaki in the ninth window from our A-Zdvent calendar of architects. Isozaki's most famous projects include the Museum of Modern Art in Gunma, but he more recently completed an inflatable mobile concert hall in collaboration with artist Anish Kapoor and the Qatar National Convention Centre, where tree-like columns support an overhanging roof (pictured).

See more architecture by Arata Isozaki »