Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private Residence

House by Remy Meijers Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceRemy Meijers decorated the interior of this house, called Manor by the River. An interior is more than just a collection of fine furniture. It has to feel like a second skin. In order to feel like a home, it has to exude calm and serenity. It’s definitely not an easy job to obtain the perfect balance between neat and serene and create that perfect living environment. For Manor by the River, the Dutch designer decided to bring a sense of freedom by playing with height and space. Tall ceilings and wide windows enhance the feeling of breeziness, while the natural soft tones of colour make the interior feel cozy and comfortable.

Details House1 Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private Residence“This one-hundred-year-old manor, which until recently had been used as office premises, is restored to its former glory. Also the original interior layout was used as the basis for the new floor-plan design. Characteristic features include the wide central corridor on the various levels. Marble floors and ornamental ceilings echo the house’s rich history.” The decoration items, like the vases and the chandeliers, add a touch of sophistication and grace. The furniture feels precious while the kitchen looks fully equipped and modern.

View1 Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceDetails Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceWhite Interior Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceKitchen1 Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceStaircase1 Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceStairs And Glass Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceOffice Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceFrame Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private Residence Details Kitchen Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceDecor Elements Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceKids Room Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceWood And Leather Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceStorage Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceShower Cabin Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceFun Tub Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceBathroom1 Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceGrey Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceDetails Bathroom1 Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceBathroom for Kids Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private ResidenceGarden Breezy Ambience Defining The Manor by the River Private Residence

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Furniture Inspired by Wooden Boxes and Broomsticks

Furniture Inspired by Wooden Boxes and Broomsticks

The LivingBlock collection is more or less a series of furniture made up of boxes and four sticks. While that’s the general idea that Madrid-based designer Antonio Serrano Bulnes had when he created the line for Mad Lab, the idea comes from his childhood where he played with wooden boxes and pieces of broomsticks.

Furniture Inspired by Wooden Boxes and Broomsticks in home furnishings Category

The cubed storage units are assembled in unusual shapes and not your typical tall rectangular bookshelves. The legs pierce through the cubes making way for a very cool and intentional design element. Each piece is produced without hardware, only glued finger joints and then finished with natural waxes.

Furniture Inspired by Wooden Boxes and Broomsticks in home furnishings Category

The company is all about sustainability and recycling and that’s how they approach everything they produce. The materials are locally sourced also.

Furniture Inspired by Wooden Boxes and Broomsticks in home furnishings Category

Furniture Inspired by Wooden Boxes and Broomsticks in home furnishings Category

Furniture Inspired by Wooden Boxes and Broomsticks in home furnishings Category

The other pieces are made much the same way with the legs fit through the table and seat tops.

Furniture Inspired by Wooden Boxes and Broomsticks in home furnishings Category

Furniture Inspired by Wooden Boxes and Broomsticks in home furnishings Category








MoMA’s Le Corbusier Exhibit is Must-See, Says Critic Alexandra Lange

Although critiquing the exhibit for some “critical flaws” – namely the choice of theme and the lack of explanatory text – ’s review for The New Yorker praises the MoMA’s Le Corbusier exhibit, “An Atlas of Modern Landscapes,” as a “must-see” thanks to its varied displays, which show “the terrific span of Le Corbusier’s career in , space, and scale [...] If current architects take anything from the exhibition [...]  it should be the power of those big, gestural drawings, where visual and verbal argument vividly come together.” Read the rest of Lange’s critique at The New Yorker. 

Looking Back at the Success of Harbor Point

HarborPoint-Model_HERO.jpg(90) Harbor Point was failed public housing—until it was rebuilt as the nation's first mixed-income community by developer Joe Corcoran and architect Joan Goody. Twenty-five years later, what can we learn from this visionary project?

Buckminster Fuller’s Gold Dome to be preserved

The Gold Dome building based on Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome will be preserved. TEEMCO, an Oklahoma-based environmental professional engineering firm has purchased the architecturally historic Gold Dome building located on legendary Route 66. As one of the first geodesic domes in the world, the Gold Dome is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places.



It was a dome of many firsts: the first dome to have a gold-anodized aluminum roof, the first above-ground geodesic dome, and the first Kaiser Aluminum dome used as a bank. Due to these forward thinking attributes, the building was billed as the “Bank of Tomorrow.”

You’d Go Back In Time For These Kids’ Rooms

You’d Go Back In Time For These Kids’ Rooms

If there’s one place people aren’t afraid to use color it’s the kid’s room. Suddenly, the most bland and beige of them go primary or princess pink. We prefer more creative color palettes for the kiddies, like sky blue accented with earth tones or clear reds and blues tempered with orange and a good dose of gray. If you’ve gotta go pink or purple, be sure it’s with plenty of white, and try adding black as an anchor. Here are a trio of little people places along with palettes created on Colourlovers for this week’s CMYLK.

Youd Go Back In Time For These Kids Rooms in interior design Category

Photo by Lucas Allen

Youd Go Back In Time For These Kids Rooms in interior design Category

Photo via Living Etc.








Ice Rink of Liège / L’Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand

Architects: L’Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand
Location: Liege, Belgium
Gappa Structure: Yves Weinand, Arianit Shevelli Fluids: BET Nicolas Ingénieries
Area: 7,410 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Marc Detiffe

Technical Control: SECO L’Escaut Project Team: David Crambert, Annelies Kums, Michaël Bianchi, Olivier Bastin, Claire Laborde, François Lichtlé, Déborah Vanderlinden, Tilman
Health And Safety Coordinator: SIXCO
General contractor: Moury Construct
Timber structure: Lamcol

From the architect. At the root of the project: a round, fluid and generous shape, as a metaphor of a universe of ice. As its construction progressed: a sea monster, a whale covered with 200,000 aluminum scales.

Public/Private

The new ice rink of Liège is embedded into a crevice of the Médiacité, private real estate development project which came to redevelop a former industrial site on the right bank of the Meuse. It inherits several constraints that it clarifies in an autonomous and unitary form, until incorporating the access to the mall’s car park in its climax: the whale’s head.

As the opacity of the building is essential to insulate it from the heat,

it is its entire body, by its nature, its material and its shape that means

the relational dimension it wants to maintain with its environment. Moreover, the composition of its outer shell (on the mass-spring-mass principle) achieves a noise attenuation of 50db and protects the residents of the adjacent street.

Apart from a succession of portholes to the street sidewalk that suggest the activity of the strange object, the only transparent opening in the façade,

is this bay as big as an antechamber that realizes a frank and larger indoor/outdoor contact.

On the one hand, the public building is integrated into the multitude of store names of the mall, as the main entrance is located at the “gallery” side. On the other hand, through its secondary entrance, it is inserted at the back of the service street of the shopping centre, giving a more positive urban value to this dead end. This « public mammal », stranded behind a scene dedicated to consumers, plays with the shimmering of its metal skin and the glare of its white interior to attract citizens and encourage them to skate.

The whale’s head above the car park entrance

The main access to the car park of the mall is located at the only “end cap”, identity pointer of the rink. This dome is the most curved and spectacular area of the façade, where the careful scheme of the scales is revealed. This volume rises gently to allow cars to go. A load bearing element straight out of the 70’s reminds us of the glorious past of Liège, a when car was queen in town planning as in some architectural projects (residence Simenon and its included petrol station, residence Belvedere with its architectural ramp). Today,

it is no longer welcome, but it is still omnipresent in the city. Why should we deny it? Let us honor it by adding the atmosphere of New York in the 20’s and its “diners”.

The interior space of the rink focuses on the heart of the matter: functionality, economy and pleasure.

Guided tour

In the Médiacité, at the entrance to the ice rink, a white light shower of 1000 lux indicates the direction of the world of ice. Once past the airlock chamber, we dive into an ambient temperature of 16 ° C all year round.

In the whale’s stomach

Upon arrival in the foyer, the whole rink and volume of the building is visible through a transparent metal wall. Here you can sometimes have a hint at amateurs, sometimes hockey teams or figure skaters. The skating area is directly accessible from the foyer. We get our skates, pull them on and are ready to slide!

The “wood room” adjacent to the rink is a recreation room with a solid oak flooring. One can enjoy Liège waffles, perhaps even Lacquemants in October?

As visitors, walking along the metal wall until the end, we are reaching the first floor and its cafeteria. On the way, by looking through the mesh, the kinetics of storage is shown: skate drying and sharpening.

While climbing the stairs, we discover the dome and a large window with rounded edges, and finally the carcass of a marine mammal… Ah yes, the whale!

If we’re coming by car, we quickly identify that it is the glued laminated timber structure#E completely laid bare before our eyes that creates the strange shape previously penetrated. Are we inside the Venturi’s duck?… The scales ratio is therefore increased tenfold. Just a quarter turn to the right#8 and the rink, surrounded with its 1200 seats, presents itself to our eyes. The inhabitants of Liège will recognize the seats of the former ice rink from Coronmeuse, hosted in the “Grand Palais des fêtes”, built for the Universal Exhibition of 1939.

During events, the cafeteria is transformed into a XXL taproom, integrating the walkway along the façade that merges with the rink volume: the domestic scale of the

bar is then confronted with the massiveness and the emotion of a hockey match or a figure skating gala.

Thirsty racehorse

The pleasure of the skater, the player, the spectator and the visitor is made for by the space, but also by the performance of this tool: an outer shell with an insulation factor of K22, equivalent to a passive house ; 2 refrigeration units developing 1000kW coupled with 4 sets of air coolers ; a ventilation system#12 of the room with a flow rate of 60,000 m3/h for dehumidifying the air of the rink ; 80 spotlights ensuring a perfect homogeneity of 1200 lux during matches and competitions, particularly when broadcasted.

Formidable engineering was necessary to allow this sea monster to perform at a high level, but also to reuse consumed energy: heat pump, ventilation system and hot water tank recovering a part of the heat produced by the refrigeration units, a piping system as a Tichelmann loop to better distribute the cooling liquid under the rink and thus consume less.

During the preliminary studies, a connection to the heating system of the shopping centre was also considered to carry away part of the generated heat. It can still be done later if the centre wishes.

Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand © Marc Detiffe Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand First Floor Plan Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Second Floor Plan Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Roof Floor Plan Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Ground Floor Plan Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Basament Floor Plan Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Site Plan Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Elevation Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Elevation Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Section Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Section Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Section Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Section Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Section Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Detail Ice Rink of Liège / L'Escaut Architectures + BE Weinand Detail

Dominique Perrault / Moleskine

From the Publisher. A selection of materials produced by DPA Studio for two international contests for museums, showing how unfinished works can also become remarkable experiments. , maquettes, notes and diagrams narrate these endeavors.

, the author of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France in Paris and of the Ewha Womans University in Seoul, received many prestigious prizes and awards including: “Grande Médaille d’or d’Architecture” in 2010, “Seoul Metropolitan Architecture Award” for EWHA Womans University in Korea, “World Architecture Award” in 2002, “Mies van der Rohe prize” in 1997, “French national Grand Prize for Architecture” in 1993.

Content

- Writings
- [In]Complete projects
- In the pal of the hand of Dominique Perrault
- Interview with Dominique Perrault
- Drawings
- City of Culture of Galicia
- Fondation Pinault for Contemporary Art
- Composition practice
- Biography

Publisher: Moleskine SpA
Editors: Francesca Serrazanetti, Matteo Schubert
Contribution Texts: Rafaël Magrou, Gilles de Bure 
Size: 5 x 8.25 x 0.65(inches); 13 x 21 x 1.7(cm)
Format: Matte coated paper, Clothbound, raw cardboard + cloth on spine 
Pages: 144 (+100 colour illustrations)
ISBN13: 978-88-6613-472-5

White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands

White Contemporary House  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Meet the exquisite all-white Bemmel Residence, located in Bemmel, the Netherlands. Built on two levels, the lovely rectangular home is an oasis of tranquility, that meets the expectations of the owner. He asked for a minimalist home and an office, both characterised by breeziness and transparence. The project was handled to Bob Ronday and Maxim Winkelaar and this is what they come up with: “We have made a design that exactly suits the wishes of our client. We have used big window frames so there is from the inside a nice view at the surroundings. The large porch at the rear of the house strengthened the inside-out relationship. The residence is well insulated en there is a heat pump installation. Next to the house is a natural swimming pool.” The infinity swimming pool integrates perfectly into the house’s minimalist design line.

Details White House  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands The interior is very neat and modern, also “dressed up” in white. The contemporary minimalism characterises the entire living space: the living room, the bedrooms and the bathrooms, even the semi-open porch with its cut outs. Despite the “sterile” kind of look, the house is an inspiration for those who are fond of great examples of minimalist design. The glass panels, replacing the classic walls aim to connect the interior to the exterior.

Windows  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Infinity pool  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Terrace1  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Details Terrace  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Table2  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Details Kitchen1  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Kitchen2  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Neat  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Details Staircase  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Stairs3  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Wooden Stairs  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Neutral Colours1  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Grey1  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Details Bathroom2  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands Bathroom5  White Contemporary Villa Integrating an Office in the Netherlands

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Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute

Located in the core area of Chenggong New C.B.D, the main challenge for the design of the Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center was to integrate the local cultures plus various functional programs into one contemporary yet harmonious form. Designed by team members Wang Wensheng, Damian Donze and Sidney Gong of the Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute, their winning proposal takes on an abstract path to integrate the local cultures. More images and architects’ description after the break.

The Culture Department of Yunnan Province has conceived the Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center as a multi-functional international cultural exchange place in order to increase the protection of the national cultural heritage, to strengthen the cultural relics, to take full advantage of the rich cultural resources of Yunnan Province, and to deepen cultural exchange and cooperation with Southeast Asia. The project is 6-stories/36m high, and has a floor area of about 35,000 square meters.

In the preliminary analysis, we extracted two main aspects for the building to focus on. First, the different local cultural identities with their traditional dresses, dances and songs. Second, the Hani rice terraces together with the local subtropical plant diversity.

The method for the manifestations of cultural identity was an important issue for us. Many cases show that a growing number of new cultural buildings try to directly imitate traditional buildings or even objects. Generally speaking, these new buildings build with new methods and new materials can’t successfully portray the original. Hence, we decided to refrain from that method in order to take on a more abstract path which is more fitting to today’s situation.

The footprint of the building was simply derived from the building site while the interior got divided into four, round parts that were cut by the building outline. This dialog between the outside and the interior creates a rich spatial effect. The contour of each segment enlarges towards the top, in a cone-like manner, to the point where they finally intersects. The resulting public atrium is illuminated by a number of skylights that let the sun shine in. Though the four segments could function individually, they are interconnected with many pedestrian bridges to ensure the possibility of free movement throughout the building.

For the facade, we tried to implement the local cultures in an abstract way. It is made up of alternating perforated and non-perforated metal panels that cover and protect the building, yet let sunlight enter and lets people see outside. At each entrance, however, the facade opens up, much like a theater curtain, and creates the entrance situations. The facade acts like a dress for the building, and in its own way, takes reference from the local minorities. Even more so at night when the LEDs of the facade create a colorful play, almost as if the building was dancing it’s own dance.

Kunming, having a mild climate all year around, is an ideal location to create an extensive landscape design. Our focus didn’t stop at the site itself, though; we gave special attention to the roof. Taking reference from the surrounding subtropical nature and the Hani terraces, we created a green roof garden. Most of the roof is laid out like a small park and is reserved for the offices on the top floors. Right in the middle of the garden, however, there is a great exterior amphitheater with 1000 seats that can host big cultural events.

The underground contains mechanical rooms and an underground parking garage with 169 parking lots. The first floor of the building is mostly open to the public and accommodates national culture and art displays, heritage protection spaces and a cafe. From here the building gets divided up into four parts: the exhibition center in the North, the art academy in the East, the theater in the South and the art studios in the West.

Exhibition Center:

Each floor has different types of exhibition spaces for topics such as heritage, culture, art and photography. The top two floors, however, are occupied by a cinema complex which contains a 100 seat cinema, a 70 seat cinema and four 56 seat cinemas. This segment is accessible through two panorama elevators as well as the central escalators that are located between the exhibition segment and the theater segment.

Art Academy:

The lower floors contain an art school/education center while the top three floors contain volunteer offices and accommodation for the aforementioned school.

Theater:

Located in this segment are: a medium-sized theater with 700 seats, suitable for dramas, dances, symphonies and other multi-functional activities; a small theater with 300 seats, suitable for theatrical performances and film viewings; a convention center and an amphitheater on the roof with 1000 seats. To be able to cope with the large flow of people at the beginning and at the end of a performance, four elevators were strategically located at two main entrances while additional support was created with the escalators in the center. All the backstage functions such as: the backstage, a V.I.P. room, admin offices, production studios and rehearsal studios are located in the back and have their own circulation flow.

Art Studios:

This segment contains A.V. labs as well as art studios. It is accessible through its own elevator.

Architects: Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute
Location: Kunming, China
Design Team: Wang Wensheng, Damian Donze, Sidney Gong
Site Area: 17,540m2
Total Area: 42,005m2
Far: 1.97
Footprint: 38.05%
Size: Green Area 9,214m2; Above Ground 34, 500m2; Underground 7,505m2; 1st Floor 7,200m2; 2nd Floor 5,700m2; 3rd Floor 6,000m2; 4th Floor 6,300m2; 5th Floor 6,500m2; 6th Floor 3,200m2
Total Height: 36m
Floors: 6 + Underground
Car Parking: 169
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute

Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute masterplan. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute 1st floor plan. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute underground floor plan. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute 2nd floor plan. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute 3rd floor plan. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute 4th floor plan. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute 5th floor plan. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute 6th floor plan. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute roof plan. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute section. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute facade diagram. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute circulation diagram. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute traffic diagram. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute functions diagram. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute Southwest International Ethnic Culture and Art Center Winning Proposal / Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute shape diagram. Image Courtesy of Tongji Architectural Design and Research Institute

P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S’ Latest Expressive, Experimental Pavilion: Textile Room

This article originally appeared in ’s Point of View Blog as “Working at the Crystalline Level.

Los Angeles-based is among the most intriguing and progressive firms working in architecture today. They seem relentless in pushing boundaries in areas like ultra-light-weight high-tech materials and immersive media. They are also very thoughtful and patient in the way they approach design.

This is good because what they are engaged in and the way they work takes time. By collaborating with engineers and innovators in different industries they are slowly changing the way architecture is carried out and conceived on material and ontological levels. They don’t do spec homes, they do what’s new, and sometimes try to do what hasn’t been done yet.

Founder and co-principal Marcelo Spina and co-principal Georgina Huljich both teach, he at SCI-ARC and she at UCLA, where they pursue research interests with students and then reflect that back into their small but energetic practice tucked away in one of Los Angeles’ rustic urban edges, Atwater Village.

One thing to recently emerge from this office is the experimental carbon fiber pavilion they call Textile Room.

It’s one of the first things you notice when you walk into, “A New Sculpturalism: Contemporary Architecture from Southern California,” the controversy-plagued show currently underway at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles.

The project, a crystal-shaped, quasi-rigid object, seemingly physically and experientially blurs the line between hard and soft, tactile and tectonic, intimate and public, and hints at future possibilities for extreme lightweight high-tech materials in architecture on a broader scale. It behaves like a “room” in that you step into it, but it is more like an event, a deeply engaging space for the senses.

P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S was selected for the show by curator, Christopher Mount, for their interest in integrating digital design, fabrication, and experimental materials. They were asked to propose a pavilion that would embody the spirit of the show: addressing the on-going formal and material innovation that defines architecture in Southern California, particularly Los Angeles.

By partnering with high-performance sail-makers, North Sails, P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S was able to develop a custom carbon fiber surface layered and patterned through robotic manufacturing. Spina and Huljich worked closely with North Sails’ Flexible Composite division to develop and refine the properties of this ultra-lightweight and tension-resistant material.

But they didn’t stop there. They engaged it as an expressive surface to produce dense and shimmering environmental effects through video projection. For this they tapped Casey Reas, video artist. Reas produced a continuous, generative video collage assembled from clips of movies set in Los Angeles that feature the city, its growth and transformation. Film sequences were cut into strips and positioned onto the carbon fiber grid of the pavilion. Textile Room becomes activated through this re-presentation of Los Angeles’ urban infrastructure and architecture as the film clips interact with the material properties of the carbon fiber’s weaves and tapes.

Rayner Banham’s The Four Ecologies (1971) and related BBC documentary Rayner Banham Loves Los Angeles (1972) and Thom Andersen’s documentary Los Angeles Plays Itself (2003) are the foundation for this component of Textile Room. The film clips are grouped into themes that feature different areas of the city and shift from day to night. From a list of nearly 50 films, two dozen were selected to represent the city. They range from Double Indemnity (1944) to more recent films like Jackie Brown (1997), from classic dramas to action thrillers. Many of the films focus on driving and moving through the city with a quick pace, such as Gone in 60 Seconds (1974), Speed (1994), and The Fast and the Furious (2001) and the tradition of noir films, such as Point Blank (1967) and Drive (2011).

This integration of advanced manufacturing, architectural design, and digital media points to an alternative mode of production for architecture, extending well beyond traditional approaches to design and construction. This has far-reaching implications for how buildings and spaces could be conceived and constructed.

Huljich sees the project as a way forward for larger things. “It’s about patterned materiality and 2D effects at the crystalline level,” she says. “The idea that surface articulation can be achieved at the internal level of material rather than form is something we hope to be able to do in our larger work.” This is the primary reason why they work so closely with industry to advance the materials and technologies they hope to deploy architecturally. She adds, “They are not quite there yet, but hopefully one day.”

As an example, the knowledge gained from Textile Room, directly fed into the development of their new project currently underway at SCI-Arc’s Arts District campus, the iconic landmark event space called League of Shadows.

P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S designed League of Shadows to be a neighborhood attractor. “We believe that if executed correctly, the pavilion could potentially activate a new node within the downtown area,” says Spina. Like Textile Room, League of Shadows exploits material and technological advances to produce dynamic environmental effects. The architecture itself will be technology in action and a communicator of new media, occupying a prominent corner in one of LA’s most rapidly transforming neighborhoods.

What P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S gains from their novel use carbon fiber is a range of variables they can manipulate to great effect as designers. As Spina says, “The material is not neutral at all, but rather something we can engage creatively. We saw a lot of possibility for texture, phenomenal translucency and material articulation, and our intention was to tease these things out through a project like this.”

Textile Room will be on display at MOCA’s Geffen Contemporary through September 16.

Project Team

Architect:P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S / Marcelo Spina & Georgina Huljich

Project Architect:Daniele Profeta

Design Team:Matthew Kendall, Robert Panossian, Ashley Sholder, Viola Ago, Mike Wang, Jeff Giuducci, Harrison Steimbuch, Andrew Choi

Media Projection:Casey Reas / CB Reas Studio

Advanced Material Manufacturing:Bill Pearson / North Sails

Structural Engineering:Matthew Melnyk / Nous Engineering

Structure Fabrication:Tortoise Industries

Photography and Video:Monica Nouwens

Click here to view the embedded video.

Textile Room 03 FULL from Metropolis Magazine on Vimeo.

Guy Horton is a writer based in Los Angeles. In addition to authoring “The Indicator”, he is a frequent contributor to The Architect’s Newspaper, Metropolis Magazine, The Atlantic Cities, and The Huffington Post. He has also written for Architectural Record, GOOD Magazine, and Architect Magazine. You can hear Guy on the radio and podcast as guest host for the show DnA: Design & Architecture on 89.9 FM KCRW out of Los Angeles. Follow Guy on Twitter @GuyHorton.