Goodwood Residence / WOHA

Architects: WOHA
Location: Bukit Timah Road, Singapore
Architect In Charge: Richard Hassell Wong Mun Summ
Design Team: Pearl Chee, Alan Lau, Cheah Boon, Kwan Goh, Soon Kim, Hong Feng Lin, Kwong Lay Lay, Balaiyan Sivakumar, Shandy Loh, Anapat Chanadisai
Area: 69,350 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Patrick Bingham-Hall

Mechanical & Electrical Engineers: Rankine & Hill Singapore Pte Ltd
Civil & Structural Engineers: DE Consultants (S) Pte Ltd
Quantity Surveyors: WT Partnership (Singapore)
Facade Consultant: Aurecon Singapore
Landscape Architect: ICN Design International
Lighting Consultant: Lighting Planner Associates Pte Ltd
Signage Designer: Duet Design Pte Ltd
Interiors (Function Rooms): Miaja Design Group Pte Ltd
Acoustic Consultant: Acviron Acoustics Consultants Pte Ltd
Piling Contractor: Ryobi-Kiso Pte Ltd
Main Contractor: Poh Lian Construction (Pte.) Ltd (1st Main Contract), Lian Beng Construction (1988) Pte Ltd (2nd Main Contract)
Client/Developer: Su Zheng, Mei Zhou Yubai
Kitchen Appliances: BSH
Kitchen Cabinets: DesignStudio
Wardrobes: DesignStudio
Sanitary Wwares: Carrera
Ironmongery: Dline Asia
Stones: Polybuiling / Stonrich / T&L
Electrical & Security: APP
Systems: ISS Hydroculture
Softscape Subcontractor: Otis Elevator
Lift Subcontractor: DIS
Acmv Subcontractor: AVA Global / Lian Beng Construction
Cost Piling Contract: $11,319,000
Cost 1st Main Contract: $191,930,000
Cost 2nd Main Contract: $55,000,000

From the architect. Set amidst an enclave of black and white houses just off the prime Orchard/Scotts Road area, and against a verdant 20-hectare backdrop of greenery, the 210-unit Goodwood Residence is conceived on a macro scale as a breathing space – a rarity in high density urbanised Singapore – and an extension of the Goodwood Hill tree conservation area that it shares a boundary of 150m with. Articulated as two 12-storey L-shaped blocks, the 2.5-hectare development dialogues with the hill that it embraces and merges with in a language of openness and continuity made expressive by varying degrees of scale and privacy.

All units are one apartment thick, with the blocks configured like boundary walls that define and enclose a series of courtyards that first draws its residents through an intimately scaled tree-lined boulevard that wraps around a pair of foliage screened tennis courts, leading to a formally scaled cobblestone entrance courtyard featuring a cluster of majestic raintrees, and finally opens out from under the canopies, like a clear forest glade, into an expansive central open lawn/ swimming pool. This spacious courtyard that visually merges into Goodwood Hill, measures some 100m across opposite blocks, which enhances the privacy of its residents while offering excellent views towards the lush greenery. It is the main community gathering place and breathing room of the development, complete with club house facilities (concierge, reading lounge, private function room and pools) that parallel that of serviced apartments. Smaller landscaped courtyards branching off the sheltered walkways are further extended into the basement carpark as entry points, making pleasant the homecoming experience with natural day light, fresh air and planting.

On a building scale, distinct strata of living experiences are crafted. The ground floor units are designed as a new typology of “landed housing apartments”, with lofty ceilings, generous outdoor pool terraces and specially devised auto-sliding gates/garden windows that are a modern interpretation of a traditional haha wall, allowing owners control over the degree of privacy and views out into the central lawn. Overlooking the central courtyard on the 2nd and 3rd storeys, are 15 units designed with treehouse cabanas perched amidst the treetop canopies, immersing its inhabitants in close-range nature. Rising above this tree line are the mid-levels (4th-11th storeys), which have overlapping double volume balconies – semi indoor/outdoor spaces reminiscent of the projected drawing studios of the black and white colonial houses from which to fully enjoy the expanse of openness and panoramic views towards Goodwood Hill. This culminates in the 12th storey penthouses that are sky-bungalows complete with generous roof/pool terraces that effectively recreate a new ground level with the added advantage of unobstructed city views and cooling breezes at elevated height.

Inspired by patterns of traditional Asian woven textiles and the roll up bamboo chicks of the black and white colonial houses in the vicinity, all typical apartment units (2nd storey upwards) feature fine aluminium fins orientated at 45 degrees to north-south, that are devised as operable façade screens which not only provide vertical sun shading without compromising on ventilation, but also allows user-controlled amounts of privacy as well as facade animation. Planters of 1m width, coupled with projecting balconies of either 2.7m or 4.5m depth, further provide vertical greenery and horizontal shading for the apartments below.

Conceived with sustainable design principles from the very onset, the project showcases several other (below listed) innovative environmental features and demonstrates that the introduction of such green measures, which cost only 1% more in construction cost, need not come at a high premium if adopted early in the design process. The estimated savings from these implementations are approximately $600,000 on annual utility bills for the home and the common areas, which is equivalent to 20% reduction in the monthly maintenance cost. Goodwood Residence has been awarded the prestigious GreenMark Platinum Award by the Building and Construction Authority of Singapore.

Green Space & Green Living

Complementing and extending the green of Goodwill Hill are 55 existing trees which are preserved, along with approximately 500 new trees that are native to Southeast Asia. This is reinforced by some 1,700sqm of vertical landscaping and the grand central lawn at the heart of the development. Almost 80% of the estate is dedicated to landscaping and communal facilities.

Smart Water Management

To mimimise the use of potable water, a self-sustaining irrigation system that harvests rainwater, irrigation water run-off and underground water to irrigate the plants during the wet and dry seasons is devised. This is made possible due to the site’s high water table and foothill location. Reed planting beds that act as filters further provide a natural bio-filtration process along the water migration route in order to improve water quality before it is stored for the next cycle of irrigation.

User Friendly Dual Pneumatic Chutes

Separate refuse chutes for organic waste and recyclable waste are provided side by side at the common service lobbies for the convenience of residents and are connected to a development-wide pneumatic waste system, eliminating the need for multiple refuse collection points within the estate.

Zero Building Waste Concept

100% of the internal walls of Goodwood Residence are built from reclaimed aggregates that originated from the pre-existing building walls and structures.

Goodwood Residence / WOHA © Patrick Bingham-Hall Goodwood Residence / WOHA © Patrick Bingham-Hall Goodwood Residence / WOHA © Patrick Bingham-Hall Goodwood Residence / WOHA © Patrick Bingham-Hall Goodwood Residence / WOHA © Patrick Bingham-Hall Goodwood Residence / WOHA © Patrick Bingham-Hall Goodwood Residence / WOHA © Patrick Bingham-Hall Goodwood Residence / WOHA © Patrick Bingham-Hall Goodwood Residence / WOHA © Patrick Bingham-Hall Goodwood Residence / WOHA © Patrick Bingham-Hall Goodwood Residence / WOHA © Patrick Bingham-Hall Goodwood Residence / WOHA First Storey Plan Goodwood Residence / WOHA Third Floor Plan Goodwood Residence / WOHA Cabana 4 Bedroom Unit Plan Goodwood Residence / WOHA Typical 4 Bedroom Unit Plan Goodwood Residence / WOHA Typical 4 Bedroom Unit Plan Goodwood Residence / WOHA Section AA Goodwood Residence / WOHA Section BB Goodwood Residence / WOHA Part section

Tea Mountain by A1 Architects

A1 Architects have recently completed a tea shop named Tea Mountain, located in Prague,
Czech Republic.

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Description from the architects

The shop called Tea Mountain, recently opened in Prague, brings a new experience how to enjoy the tea, next to contemporary style of serving it is also traditional gustation of high quality tea imported from Japan, South Korea, India, Taiwan or China. One of the main issues of a1architects and the owners discussion was how to present the tea in its best to wider audience in a delicate yet friendly manner.

Shop interior
two worlds, two atmospheres….
The seating and drinking happens under the dark vault with its calm appearance and just next to it in bright earthy colours one could buy or watch the presentation of tea.

The space of two orginal 19th century vaults is divided by gold-plated arch line situated almost inthe centre of the shop.

The black plaster with added pieces of coal and straw creates an ambient atmosphere and it gets out the customer in his first step into another atmosphere out of the busy street. The following part of the shop is rather light to unable one to focus on details of the tea presentation.

The seating at the table in the black part is acompanied with charred columns with inbuilt gilt cavity which serves as a spot light and brings beautiful warm yellow light on the table.

The counter and display shelves are made out of ash wood with exceptional details like inbuilt limestone tea tray, rope handles or charred cover of the scale, all these small unique pieces could be rather seen in a second glance and await pacient visitor.

Refined details and simple work of layering are the main features of the Tea Mountain shop design.

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Design: A1 Architects

This Your Father’s License

THIS IS YOUR FATHER'S LICENSE

Architects are highly intelligent people. They are the members of a noble profession who in dictionaries referred as master builders.

They are taught and talk a specialized language, they have skills to design and visualize three dimensionally, and intern long years to be called as “architects” after passing series of examinations in order to legally practice “architecture.”

I am an architect, thanks to membership fee paying institution I work for, an AIA member, and over the years I have gone through all those rigorous checkpoints to get there.

I can legally design any building from houses to skyscrapers, sign and seal the drawings of those buildings, taking full responsibility of their design.

My professional training and expertise almost guarantees that they won't fail under most circumstances and I am the captain of the team consisting of many hardhat wearing professionals and builders who ask questions about the building under construction and look at m...

Minimalist Japanese Residence Making the Most of a Narrow Site: House F

architecture house f Minimalist Japanese Residence Making the Most of a Narrow Site: House F

Architect Kenji Ido of Ido, Kenji Architectural Studio completed House Fin, a minimalist Japanese residence located in Osaka. The house was especially envisioned for a couple in an urban narrow site, neighbored by a mixed-use area where small houses, small factories, and small office buildings coexist. The clients requested a garden in the south side of the site and decided to make a three-level building overlooking the green spaces. They aimed at a quiet, comfortable space, with plenty of natural lighting and a certain feeling of security.

design house f Minimalist Japanese Residence Making the Most of a Narrow Site: House FThe minimalist Japanese design approach can be observed throughout the interiors of this Osaka home. With walls painted in white, a feeling of space was subtly achieved. The wooden stairway, shelves and doors add a warm touch. It is truly inspiring to see how the architect managed to transform a 53 square meter surface into a perfect home for two.  [Information received via e-mail by Architect Kenji Ido; Photography by Takumi Ota]
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International Urban Design Ideas Competition – Trenčín – City on the River

is currently facing changes connected with the relocation of the railway track directly within the city centre as part of the modernisation of the European railway corridor, with planned completion in 2016.

Therefore, the City of Trenčín seeks fresh and innovative urbanistic solutions that will overcome transportation barriers and connect the historic city centre with the riverfront, giving the city a new growth impulse and enhancing its expression. The winning proposals will form the base for a new Central City Zone Masterplan, which the municipality intends to develop following the results of the competition.

Interested participants can register free of charge on the competition website www.2014.trencin.sk until 4 March 2014. The submission deadline for competition entries is 24 April 2014.

Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative

Architects: SKEW Collaborative
Location: Shanghai,
Architect In Charge: Eunice Seng, H. Koon Wee, Darren Zhou
Design Team: Zhao Wenju, Sam Cheng
Area: 110 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of

From the architect. The alteration and addition of Wulumuqi Road Apartment took advantage of what was an interpretation of a local policy of urban beautification in the city of Shanghai. There was a city-wide policy (平改坡) where pitched red-clay tiled roofs were being added to the flat reinforced concrete roofs of modern commune housing that were considered dull and devoid of civic or traditional character. The drab housing that qualified for this alteration tends to be housing blocks that were built hastily by the Communist Party in the 1940s and 50s. However, the site for this project was a particularly poorly built Lilong housing block of the 1930s.

In the re-design of this top-floor apartment, the original flat roof was partially demolished to give way to an attic addition. This attic took reference from the vernacular form of the dormer window found in the neighborhood. The triangular form of the dormer window roof served as an archetypal form that was rigorously applied to this project – with all of its implications of structure, envelope and geometry. The addition of an attic bedroom and study meant that the main floor can be freed up as an enlarged loft-like living space with an open kitchen, instead of its original walled up bedrooms and living room.

VERNACULAR PRIMER

On a formal level, the triangulation of the roof plane – necessary in a dormer window in order to bring daylight into the attic – was extrapolated to give shape to the ceilings, walls and new staircase. Indirect artificial lighting was achieved by concealing lights along the edges of overlapping triangles that made up the walls and ceilings. The staircase took on a similar form, where each tread and baluster was separately articulated to mark the culmination of these graduating and transformative triangle surfaces.

NEW PROGRAMMING & FORMS FOR CONTEMPORARY LIVING

On the programmatic level, the new continuous form not only gave rise to the fluid expression of the staircase, but it also gave an organizational logic to other functional needs of the apartment, such as roof level access to a small outdoor roof patio, as well as a passively cooled interior, where hot air is able to rise and escape through the new attic windows. The rest of the apartment was kept relatively plain and simple, where the existing industrial steel windows, wooden flooring and white plaster walls were retained, in anticipation of the unfolding elements from the new attic space.

HISTORICAL CONTEXT

This project sets out to blend into its surrounding by adopting the city’s policy of generating more pitched roof housing with civic character. Without being embroiled in an aesthetic debate of what constitutes a more contemporary language of architecture, this project simply took the pitched red-clad tiled roof as the Shanghai 1930s modern vernacular, and reconstructed a new narrative around this genealogy.

The construction of the new attic roof was done with recycled red clay tiles, bricks and timber beams from demolished buildings in the vicinity, and a local builder was hired to build it in the old fashion way, using traditional and affordable sheet metal flashings and roof valley gutters and perimeter gutters. The design of this project adds a twist to the adaptation of the dormer window and pitched roof vernacular. Apart from visually connecting to the 1930s modern heritage of Shanghai, this project connects more deeply to the socio-economic roots of its surroundings by searching out the old generation of trades and craftsmen who could not only put their skills to good use, but also rebuild with recycled materials from a city undergoing rapid demolition and transformation.

SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES

The main contribution this project makes towards green building practices would be the maximum use of recycled building materials and the retention of the original architecture. The desire to go with local recycled materials and craftsmen also meant that the carbon footprint could be kept at a minimum. The majority of the added attic structures and building materials, such as recycled clay tiles, bricks and timber beams, came from neighboring sites undergoing demolition.

The other notable challenge was how the original architectural fabric was retained to ensure the character of the architecture was protected. For example, original steel windows were retained in favor of standard aluminum windows, but these steel windows had to be retrofitted with insulated glazing and seals. Because the old steel window frames had very small sectional profiles, the absence of a thermal break became a less problematic issue. Supplementary heating systems and radiators were also placed along the perimeters where the fenestrations are, to minimize heat loss and gain.

Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Courtesy of SKEW Collaborative Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Courtesy of SKEW Collaborative Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Courtesy of SKEW Collaborative Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Courtesy of SKEW Collaborative Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Courtesy of SKEW Collaborative Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Courtesy of SKEW Collaborative Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Courtesy of SKEW Collaborative Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Courtesy of SKEW Collaborative Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Courtesy of SKEW Collaborative Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Courtesy of SKEW Collaborative Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Floor Plan Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Site Plan Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative South Elevation Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Detail Wulumuqi Road Apartment / SKEW Collaborative Diagram

My Ultimate Guide to Landing Your First Job in Architecture

This past December I was invited to speak at AIAS Forum 2013; the American Institute of Architecture Students national convention. This year the event was held in Chicago… Yes, Chicago in December, and yes, we were snowed-in for days. While we waited for the airports to open, I had the opportunity to speak in length […]

Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP

Architects: Associated Architects LLP
Location: Yarm School, The Friarage, Yarm, Stockton-on-Tees TS15 9EJ,
Area: 4228.0 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of Associated Architects LLP

Structural Engineer: Shire Consulting
M&E Engineer: LEDA
Quantity Surveyor: LPS
Main Contractor: Miller Construction
Total Cost: £20m

From the architect. Earlier this year Associated Architects completed the Princess Alexandra auditorium, an integral part of their overall masterplan for the school. The zinc clad performance hall won a 2013 RIBA North East award and has become a thriving arts venue in the North East.

A double-height entrance foyer, maximising stunning views of the River Tees, connects the fan-shaped flexible auditorium, capable of seating up to 800, to a new riverside academic block containing classrooms, and multi-use dance and drama group activities spaces.

The flexibility of the Auditorium was achieved through the use of robust acoustic separating constructions and specialist fit out equipment, such as telescopic seating, an acoustically separating sliding proscenium partition which divides the Auditorium and Stage Studio Theatre into two independent teaching spaces, and an orchestra pit elevator able to be set to various levels.

The masterplan site proved to be extremely sensitive, with listed buildings, conservation areas, potential flooding, nationally significant archaeology, protected species and asbestos, standing between inception and completion. During all this, the careful implementation of the phased works programme meant the school was able to remain fully operational, even during construction operations. 

The Princess Alexandra Auditorium, was unveiled by its namesake, who was treated to a 15 minutes excerpt from Les Miserables, by students from the school.

The Headmaster, Mr David Dunn, said: “We are extremely honoured to be naming the auditorium after Princess Alexandra. It is most fitting that Princess Alexandra, so well known for her support of the performing arts, agreed to open the facility and gave the blessing for it to bear her name.”

Barbora Bott, Lead Architect on project said: “Although the site offered some interesting challenges, we’ve delivered a flexible design, that’s attractive as well as practical, providing students of Yarm School the facilities to realise their full potential.”

Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Courtesy of Associated Architects LLP Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Courtesy of Associated Architects LLP Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Courtesy of Associated Architects LLP Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Courtesy of Associated Architects LLP Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Courtesy of Associated Architects LLP Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Courtesy of Associated Architects LLP Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Courtesy of Associated Architects LLP Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Courtesy of Associated Architects LLP Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Courtesy of Associated Architects LLP Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Courtesy of Associated Architects LLP Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Courtesy of Associated Architects LLP Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Courtesy of Associated Architects LLP Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP East Elevation Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Diagram 3D Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Site Plan Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Details Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Section - Details Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Elevations Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Floor Plan - Details Princess Alexandra Auditorium / Associated Architects LLP Section A

Refugee Housing Unit Selected as Finalist for World Design Impact Prize

An IKEA prototype for a modular “Refugee Housing Unit” has been selected as one of three finalists for the International Council of Societies of Industrial Design’s (Icsid) 2014. The pilot project was lauded for providing a “temporary shelter in which facilitates ‘a feeling of normality’ for families living in refugee camps.” The project will be measured against a “BioLite HomeStove” and “ABC Syringe” before an overall prize winner is announced. You can learn more about the unit here and preview the competing innovations here.

Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, Colombia

Olaya House David Ramirez Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaOlaya House is a residential project completed by David Ramirez in 2011 near Medellin (the second largest city in Colombia). The dwelling inspires serenity, embarking the inhabitants on a trip away from the urban landscape. Olaya House invites you to enjoy the outdoors. Catching the attention of those who prefer organic homes, which capture the essence of nature, it showcases a fluid interior, with clear bounds between the service, social and private areas.

Alley Olaya House and greenery Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaThe organic feel resides from the exterior, openness, natural earthy colours, stone wall (which separates the social area from the private one) and the wide terraces perceived as extensions of the living areas. “It is of great structural importance for the house, this wall allows inside a social bathroom and two separate chimneys one services the main bedroom while the other one the main lounge. The house facades are built in pail Milano bricks, that provide great strength to the volume and combined with the huge windows allows you to have a permanent communication between the inside and outside of the dwelling. ” All levels are connected through a simple sculptural staircase, allowing vertical circulation throughout the house.

Terrace Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaDeck and greenery Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaBricks Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaOpen space plan Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaEarthy colours Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaWooden deck Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaKitchen corner Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaTransparency Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaDouble height ceiling Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaLiving room detail Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaLiving room corner Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaStaircase interior Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaTop floor Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaView from above Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaNarrow corridor and window Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, ColombiaBathroom elegance Olaya House Project Inspiring Serenity: Olaya House Near Medellin, Colombia

 

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Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco’s Golden State Warriors’ Stadium

Snøhetta has released an updated, more “slimmed-down” version of the Golden State Warriors’ Stadium, which is scheduled to debut on a preeminent San Francisco waterfront site for the 2017-18 NBA basketball season. Located on Piers 30-32, just walking distance from the downtown Financial District and easily accessed by a variety of public transportation, the revised design has shaved off over 30,000 square feet of the venue’s total square footage and increased public open space to nearly 8 acres, 60 percent of the 13 acre site. 

The 695,000 square foot arena plans to please the masses by replacing the existing, “crumbling” pier with a network of open parks and plazas, complete with stunning Bay Bridge views. Not only will the 125-foot, disk-shaped stadium cater to Warriors’ needs, but it will also provide 90,000 square feet of retail space and a state-of-the-art events pavilion. 

“From the beginning, we’ve said this arena will be world-class, incorporating the best in design, and sustainability,” said Peter Guber, Co-Executive Chairman of the Warriors. “Snøhetta and AECOM have done a masterful job designing an arena and public space that will serve as the model for a 21st century digital sports and entertainment center.”

“This new updated design lives up to the importance of this incredible waterfront site and fuses together the vision of the Golden State Warriors with the landscape of the bay and the input we’ve heard over the past several months from neighbors, community leaders and regulatory agencies,” said Craig Dykers, Architect and Founding Partner of Snøhetta. “Each design we’ve introduced has built on previous versions to create a place that provides for everyone: fans, pedestrians, bicyclists, tourists, local residents and the diverse community of San Francisco.”

Architects: Snøhetta
Location: 599 The Embarcadero, San Francisco, CA 94105, USA
Pavilion Height: 125 ft
Pavilion Seating Capacity: 18,064
Total Open Space: 60% of site (7.6 acres)
Open Space At Pier Level: 3.9 acres
Retail : 90,000 GSF
Parking Spaces: 500
Bike Parking Spaces: 300
Area: 695000.0 ft2
Year: 2017
Photographs: Snøhetta

Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 3.0: Arrival onto Pier; Rendering by steelblue. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 3.0: North Towards Bay Bridge; Rendering by steelblue. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 3.0: Event Plaza; Rendering by steelblue. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 3.0: Over the Green; Rendering by steelblue. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 3.0: Grass Beach; Rendering by steelblue. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 3.0: Embarcadero Looking; Rendering by steelblue. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 3.0: Brannan Street Wharf; Rendering by steelblue. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 3.0: Aerial from Bay; Rendering by steelblue. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 3.0: Updated Site Plan; Rendering by steelblue. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta Snøhetta Unveils Version 3.0 of San Francisco's Golden State Warriors’ Stadium Version 2.0. Image © Snøhetta