Benedetta Tagliabue wins 2013 RIBA Jencks Award

Benedetta Tagliabue, the head architect of Miralles Tagliabue EMBT in Barcelona, has been selected as the recipient of the 2013 RIBA Jencks Award. Architectural theorist and writer Charles Jencks of the judging panel made the announcement on Oct. 16. The Jencks Award is given every year to an individual who has recently made a major international contribution to both the theory and practice of architecture.

Tagliabue will receive the award on Tuesday, Nov. 19 at the RIBA in London, where she will also give a public lecture, chaired by Charles Jencks. To purchase tickets for the event, click here.

From the RIBA press release:

"Benedetta Tagliabue studied architecture at the Istituto di Architettura di Venezia (IUAV) and is now director of architecture firm Miralles Tagliabue EMBT, founded in 1994 in collaboration with Enric Miralles, and based in Barcelona and Shanghai. Benedetta’s studio works in the fields of architecture, design of public spaces, rehabilitation, interior and ...

Banksy Loves New York

Screen shot 2013-10-16 at 10.50.24 AM

Banksy loves New York. How else to explain the month-long “artists residency” the once elusive British street artist has embarked upon on this side of the Atlantic? With his project, entitled Better Out than In, Banksy has taken it upon himself to make his presence felt on the streets of New York City on each and every day during the month of October. Predictably, his genius at self-promotion has ensured breathless sightings, sneering critiques, daily press reports, and the inevitable defacing by other street artists none too impressed by Banksy’s mainstream acceptance. No matter; as these photos of his Oct 7th mark in Brooklyn attests, Banksy, the counter-cultural figure is a full-fledged cultural star. And the merits of his messaging—in New York or elsewhere—are almost wholly beside the point.day-07-detail-fullday7ipadheartbanksy-177-1-1

Images: Banksyny

Snack Bar by Hou de Sousa

Snack Bar is an outdoor Chinese food and drinks stall located within the courtyard of the Paseo San Francisco shopping center in Cumbaya, Ecuador.

The project was designed to be comfortable, secure, transparent, and easy to assemble. We avoided enclosing the space, due to the hot and dry local climate, as well as the heat radiating from the cooking equipment. The design had to be open air, but security was also a factor. A cage was wrapped around the work space, allowing for plenty of natural ventilation, while simultaneously providing a security barrier. The transparency of the cage additionally benefited the client, who also owns a sit-down restaurant across the hallway, and wanted to maintain an unobstructed visual connection between both restaurants.

Snack Bar's design is simple; a box within a box. The interior core is dark and blends in with the surrounding surfaces of the mall, while the outer shell stands out in sharp contrast. Steel bars were welded into a bamboo fore...

Still Alive by Antonio Aricò for Seletti

Still Alive by Antonio Aricò for Seletti

When thinking about artistic themes, what often comes up is the still life and Antonio Aricò’s latest collection deals with that timeless idea. Designed for Seletti, Still Alive was inspired by those inanimate objects and natural shapes that painters put together as subject matter.

Still Alive by Antonio Aricò for Seletti in style fashion home furnishings art Category

The end results are a series of elements that you can arrange and combine into your own still life, each that you can use and play with. The user is invited to explore the objects creatively, becoming part of your daily routine.

Still Alive by Antonio Aricò for Seletti in style fashion home furnishings art Category

The set includes a tall wooden pitcher, a wooden vase, a cup made of brass, a wooden pencil box, a porcelain bottle, a wooden pyramid-shaped box, and a magnifying glass sphere. Each piece sits into its own carved-out place on the wooden base when you’re done playing. The objects not only look good, they’re functional.

Still Alive by Antonio Aricò for Seletti in style fashion home furnishings art Category








AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi

Construction of the Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família began in 1882, more than a century ago. The temple is still under construction, with completion expected in 2026. It is perhaps the best known structure of Catalan Modernisme, drawing over three million visitors annually. Architect Antoni Gaudi worked on the project until his death in 1926, in full anticipation he would not live to see it finished. 

Gaudi was appointed architect in 1883 at 31 years of age, following disagreements between the temple’s promoters and the original architect, Francisco de Paula del Villar y Lozano. He maintained del Villar’s Latin cross plan, typical of Gothic cathedrals, but departed from the Gothic in several significant ways. Most notably, Gaudi developed a system of angled columns and hyperboloidal vaults to eliminate the need for flying buttresses. Rather than relying on exterior elements, horizontal loads are transferred through columns on the interior.

La Sagrada Familia utilizes three-dimensional forms comprised of ruled surfaces, including hyperboloids, parabolas, helicoids, and conoids. These complex shapes allow for a thinner, finer structure, and are intended to enhance the temple’s acoustics and quality of light. Gaudi used plaster models to develop the design, including a 1:10 scale model of the main nave measuring five meters in height and width by two meters in depth. He also devised a system of strings and weights suspended from a plan of the temple on the ceiling. From this inverted model he derived the necessary angles of the columns, vaults, and arches. This is evident in the slanted columns of the Passion facade, which recall tensile structures but act in compression.

Gaudi embedded religious symbolism in each aspect of La Sagrada Familia, creating a visual representation of Christian beliefs. He designed three iconic facades for the basilica, the Glory, Nativity, and Passion facades, facing south, east, and west, respectively. The sculpting of the Nativity facade recalls smooth, intricate corbelling and was overseen by Gaudi. The Passion Facade is characterized by the work of Josep Maria Subirachs, whose angular sculptures extend the modernist character of the temple. The sculptor Etsuro Sotoo is responsible for the window ornaments and finials, which symbolize the Eucharist.

The central nave soars to a height of 45 meters, and is designed to resemble a forest of multi-hued piers in Montjuïc and granite. The piers change in cross section from base to terminus, increasing in number of vertices from polygonal to circular. The slender, bifurcating columns draw the eye upward, where light filters through circular apertures in the vaults. These are finished in Venetian glass tiles of green and gold, articulating the lines of the hyperboloids.

Once completed, La Sagrada Familia will feature eighteen towers composed to present a unique view of the temple from any single vantage point. Four bell towers representing the Apostles crown each facade, reaching approximately 100 meters in height. At the north end, a tower representing the Virgin Mary will stand over the apse. The central tower will reach 72 meters in height and symbolize Christ, surrounded by four towers representing the Evangelists.

Even as construction continues, older portions are undergoing cleaning and restoration. The temple has relied entirely on private donations since its inception, and has seen many delays due to lack of funding. A particularly significant setback occurred during the Spanish Civil War, when Gaudi’s workshop was destroyed, including much of the documentation he left behind.

Subsequent generations of craftsman and architects have relied on the remaining drawings and plaster models to advance the project, adhering to Gaudi’s vision as closely as possible. As a result, the design of the temple is a collaboration spanning centuries. Gaudi himself viewed the project as the collective work of generations. “I will grow old but others will come after me. What must always be conserved is the spirit of the work, but its life has to depend on the generations it is handed down to and with whom it lives and is incarnated.” [1]

In recent decades, La Sagrada Familia has adopted contemporary digital design and construction technologies. Architects and craftsmen use Rhinoceros, Cadds5, Catia, and CAM to understand the complex geometries and visualize the building as a whole. Plaster models are still used as a design tool, now generated by a 3-D printer to accelerate the process. A digitally rendered video was recently released showing La Sagrada Familia’s expected appearance upon completion.

[1] Basílica de la Sagrada Família. La Fundació de la Junta Constructora del Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família. Website. 7 October 2013.

AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi The Passion Facade © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi © John Kennan AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi © John Kennan AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada  Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi © Jose Gonzalvo AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi The Nativity Facade © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi The Passion Facade © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada  Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi © amazinao AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi Detail of the Nativity Facade © Famke Veenstra AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi Detail of the Passion Facade © Renate Dodell AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi Passion Facade sculpture © Eugene Zhukovsky AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi Detail of the Passion Facade doors © Todd Heiden AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi Eucharistic symbol © Eugene Zhukovsky AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi The Choir © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada  Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi © Renate Dodell AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi © Renate Dodell AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi © Renate Dodell AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi Tiled vault © Renate Dodell AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi The Crypt © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi Bell tower interior © Renate Dodell AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi Construction of the apse walls completed 1893 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi 1925 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi 1953 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi 1974 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi 1992 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi 1995 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi Construction of the aisle vaults, 1997 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi Construction of the aisle vaults, 1997 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi 2002 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi 2003 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi 2005 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi Construction of the central towers, 2007 © Todd Heiden AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi 2009 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi 2013 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi Longitudinal Section AD Classics: La Sagrada Familia / Antoni Gaudi Ground Level Plan

Architects: Antoni Gaudi
Location: Carrer de Mallorca, 401, 08013 , Spain
Architect: Antoni Gaudi
Present Chief Architect: Jordi Fauli
Former Chief Architects: Jordi Bonet, Francesc de Paula Quintana i Vidal, Isidre Puig i Boada, Lluís Bonet i Garí, , Francesc de Paula del Villar y Lozano
Deputy Chief Architects: Carles Buxadé, Joan Margarit, Josep Gómez Serrano
Technical Consultants: Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology
Project Department: Jordi Coll, Andrés de Mesa
Sculptors: Etsuro Sotoo, Josep Maria Subirachs
Stained Glass: Joan Vila-Grau
Photographs: © photographs of the Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família: Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família Board of Works. All rights reserved. Any reproduction and/or modification of photographs of the Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família without the prior written consent of the Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família Board of Works is completely forbidden.
Area: 4500.0 sqm
Photographs: Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família, John Kennan, Jose Gonzalvo, amazinao, Famke Veenstra, Renate Dodell, Eugene Zhukovsky, Todd Heiden

Cupertino council clears huge Apple ‘spaceship’ campus for liftoff

Apple's proposed new spaceship-shaped headquarters got a super-charged blast-off Tuesday night when the Cupertino City Council voted unanimously to approve the 2.8-million-square-foot behemoth beside Interstate 280, fulfilling a dream of co-founder Steve Jobs, hatching an iconic landmark for Silicon Valley, and promising more congestion in an already traffic-challenged region for decades to come.



ADFF 2013

Tonight is the kickoff of the 2013 Architecture and Design Film Festival at Tribeca Cinemas in NYC. Between today and Sunday 25 short and feature-length films are being screened in the festival's fifth year.



Some choice films include:

And here is an Ideabook at Houzz that I put together on the film festival:

Marshall Brown: The Speculative City

Marshall Brown is an architect, urban designer and principal of Marshall Brown Projects. His practice has worked on several projects in Chicago, including the Navy Pier redevelopment and a master plan for the neighborhood of Washington Park. He is also currently Director of the Master of Landscape Architecture program at Illinois Institute of Technology.

He recently founded the urbanism, art and culture think tank NEW PROJECTS in collaboration with curator Stephanie Smith. In 2003 he founded the Yards Development Workshop, a studio that set out to hi-jack Frank Gehry’s Atlantic Yards project in Brooklyn,New York. Marshall Brown’s work has been exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit and Western Exhibitions in Chicago.

Brown is on the editorial board of the Journal of Architectural Education and has lectured at the Chicago Humanities Festival, University of Michigan, Northwestern University, the Graham Foundation, and the Arts Club of Chicago. His projects and essay...

Escape velocity

From the previous post to this one, only one week had passed.  I can’t remember what all happened that semester, but I am pretty sure no studio work was done that week.  I mean, I’m basing that statement on the “last modified” date of my archived files… probably accurate…


Anyway.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This post and most Design Research posts after this will be referencing the pdf compilation moves toward the final final book. 

The full pdf for this process stage may be found at the link below.

http://issuu.com/christopherperrodin/docs/christopher_perrodin_dt_f12_11612

I will only be showing portions of the pdf's on here, cus otherwise it's a lot.  And then the next few posts will be showing refining of presentation and layout via comparison.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A lot of stuff happened.  The week of the previous post I had started reading The Harvard Design School Guide to Shopping / Harvard Design School Project on the City 2.  (Has anyone found Proje...

The Alphabet of Damián Ortega

The Alphabet of Damián Ortega

A breathtaking installation by Mexican-born artist Damián Ortega, now on view at the Gladstone Gallery in New York, requires a triple take.

Upon entering, 25 twisted and suspended forms immediately inspire wonder and curiosity, both in how they float (near invisible wire hung from impressively high ceilings) and what, if anything, the forms represent. Not knowing is the first great experience of this work and I encourage you to thumb through the photos below before reading another word.

The Alphabet of Damián Ortega in news events art Category

Damián Ortega, “Harvest”, 2013

What takes a surprising amount of time to notice is the floor, on which 25 letters of the alphabet are “written” in shadow. It is unbelievable that such abstract three-dimensional shapes translate so precisely into two-dimensional letters, and how I personally didn’t even notice for the first 5 minutes. Additionally, there are different degrees of “blur” in the shadows caused by the various distances from the floor that heighten this effect of handwriting, as if the ink faded with the speed of a massive pen. As a total experience, it’s a question of just how arbitrary AND exact our written language can be.

The Alphabet of Damián Ortega in news events art Category

Damián Ortega, “Harvest”, 2013

The Alphabet of Damián Ortega in news events art Category

Damián Ortega, “Harvest”, 2013

The Alphabet of Damián Ortega in news events art Category

Damián Ortega, “Three Letters”, 2013

Exiting the shadowy space, three “tools” on a pedestal (ignored on my way in) prompt a third viewing. The implication is that every piece in the gallery was bent by these tools or tools like them (a friend visiting from Mexico informed me that they are the shapes of common construction tools every worker carries). Suddenly the dents and scratches on the large sculptures demand attention. No longer is the author a mythical giant, but a real person(s) accomplishing amazing feats of incredible precision.

What: Damián Ortega: Harvest
Where: Gladstone Gallery, 530 West 21st St, New York, NY
When: September 13, 2013 – October 26, 2013 (Tue-Sat 10-6)

All Images: Copyright Damián Ortega, photographed by David Regen, Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels.








Filter Between Busy Street and Quiet Garden: Ecole Normale House in Bordeaux

architecture project ecole normale house Filter Between Busy Street and Quiet Garden: Ecole Normale House in BordeauxModern architecture has adapted to crowded cityscapes in a variety of manners. On Freshome, we see more and more private homes that act like filters or “buffer zones” between the street and commonly surprising courtyards. This is also the case with Ecole Normale House, a contemporary residence envisioned by FABRE/deMARIEN Architects in Bordeaux, France. The 210 square feet home is completely protected by a brick facade with a just some slits allowing light to penetrate inside. On the opposite side however, it opens up through sliding glass doors to an inner garden with swimming pool and outdoor lounge areas.
exterior project ecole normale house Filter Between Busy Street and Quiet Garden: Ecole Normale House in BordeauxAccording to the architects, “the construction is simple using concrete and glass as main materials. Beam-column system, floor slab, steps, seat, and concrete shelves are sheltered by large window frames in aluminum giving all spaces an inside-out feeling”. The residence is structured on two levels, with access to the rooms provided by a central spiral staircase. [Photography by Stéphane Chalmeau]
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You're reading Filter Between Busy Street and Quiet Garden: Ecole Normale House in Bordeaux originally posted on Freshome.

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Filter Between Busy Street and Quiet Garden: Ecole Normale House in Bordeaux

architecture project ecole normale house Filter Between Busy Street and Quiet Garden: Ecole Normale House in BordeauxModern architecture has adapted to crowded cityscapes in a variety of manners. On Freshome, we see more and more private homes that act like filters or “buffer zones” between the street and commonly surprising courtyards. This is also the case with Ecole Normale House, a contemporary residence envisioned by FABRE/deMARIEN Architects in Bordeaux, France. The 210 square feet home is completely protected by a brick facade with a just some slits allowing light to penetrate inside. On the opposite side however, it opens up through sliding glass doors to an inner garden with swimming pool and outdoor lounge areas.
exterior project ecole normale house Filter Between Busy Street and Quiet Garden: Ecole Normale House in BordeauxAccording to the architects, “the construction is simple using concrete and glass as main materials. Beam-column system, floor slab, steps, seat, and concrete shelves are sheltered by large window frames in aluminum giving all spaces an inside-out feeling”. The residence is structured on two levels, with access to the rooms provided by a central spiral staircase. [Photography by Stéphane Chalmeau]
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You're reading Filter Between Busy Street and Quiet Garden: Ecole Normale House in Bordeaux originally posted on Freshome.

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