Get Lectured: SCI-Arc Fall ’13

Archinect's Architecture School Lecture Guide for Fall 2013

Here on Archinect we just launched "Get Lectured", where we'll feature a school's lecture series--along with their snazzy posters--for the current season. Check back regularly to stay up-to-date and mark your calendars for any upcoming lectures you don't want to miss.

We'll be starting out with Archinect's Most Followed Schools profiles. Today's featured list is from the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc).

Want to share your school's lecture series? Send us your school's lecture series poster and details to connect@archinect.com.
 

Listed below are Lecture Series events only. All lectures will be held at the W.M. Keck Lecture Hall and are free of charge. No rsvp required.

SEPTEMBER

September 18, 7:00 pm
Graham Harman: Strange Objects Contra Parametricism

September 25, 7:00 pm
GRAFT: In Pursuit of Happiness


OCTOBER

October 2, 7:00 pm
Anton Garcia-Abril: Current Work

October 7, 7:00 pm
Guy Norde...

Take Breath Tea Pot by Pinyen Creative

Take Breath Tea Pot by Pinyen Creative

This teapot, called Take Breath, literally caused me to take an extra deep breath because, well, it’s breathtaking. Made of ceramic and wood, it definitely has a simple, soothing effect on the eyes, which echoes the very beverage that it has been designed to serve.

Designed by Pinyen Creative, a Taiwan-based design company, this tea pot will be shown along with some of their other work at Fresh Taiwan exhibition during Tent London.

Take Breath Tea Pot by Pinyen Creative in home furnishings Category

Take Breath Tea Pot by Pinyen Creative in home furnishings Category

Take Breath Tea Pot by Pinyen Creative in home furnishings Category

Take Breath Tea Pot by Pinyen Creative in home furnishings Category








Founders of Architecture for Humanity Step Down, Launch Five-year Plan

Click here to view the embedded video.

“It’s great to see something you started evolve into an institution. We are excited about the future of the organization and plan to continue lending support in whatever ways we can.” Kate Stohr, co-founder

Architecture for Humanity founders, Kate Stohr and Cameron Sinclair, will step down after 15 years of leading the based non-profit organization to focus on new ventures. Upon leaving, they have drafted a five year strategic vision, reiterating the organization’s purpose and needed areas of improvement. Matt Charney, Board President of Architecture for Humanity, is confident that ‘Kate and Cameron’s vision and years of dedication leaves the organization in a solid place.” To further expand operations, board directors will begin an international search for a new executive director by the end of September.

Kate Stohr, who currently serves as Board Advisor to Architecture for Humanity, will be leaving the organization on September 30, 2013 to return to her career in television and web production. , who currently serves as Executive Director, will actively lead the agency until April 6, 2014, the organization’s 15th Anniversary. After his transition, Sinclair will continue to support the organization and will focus on his own design and community development work.

View the full report at ArchitectureForHumanity.org

Artek Joins the Vitra Family

On September 6, 2013, Vitra announced it acquired Artek. The Finnish furniture company was established in 1935 by architect Alvar Aalto, his wife Aino,  Maire Gullichsen, and historian Nils-Gustav Hahl to produce furniture that promoted modern living. Over the company’s last 80 years, it has expanded its business to include rights to Ilmari Tapiovaara’s furniture […]

Guy Yanai’s Painted Chairs

eames512

We only just discovered the expressive paintings of Israeli artist Guy Yanai, whose small-scale oil on panel paintings range from illustrative to abstract. Naturally, we were pleasantly amused by these whimsical portraits of iconic Eames and Gerrit Rietveld chairs—skillfully rendered in dabs and strokes, their forms instantly recognizable as near-abstractions of line, shape and color.

RAR512chair-512

Images: Guy Yanai

Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways

Venice  Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Spotted first on Yatzer, the exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel is the place to stay when in Venice. Undoubtably, the so called Floating City is one of the most amazing places to visit, due to the romance surrounding it, its unique water canals, the historical buildings, its bridges and the stories. “Venice is a fabled destination with a glorious past. A city in northeast Italy, it is built atop 118 small islands separated by winding canals and linked by arching bridges. Once a major power in the Mediterranean, it is known today for the beauty of its setting, its architecture and its artworks.” The perfect spot to enjoy a memorable sunset, watching the sun slowly drifting into the water while feeling the scent of summer, this amazing city offers plenty of possibilities. For those in search of unique luxury experiences, we recommend to start their journey throughout Venice at the imposing and seductive Aman Canale Grande HotelFront View1 Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways A historical building, one of those places that reflect the wealth and the well-being of the old rich families, Palazzo Papadopoli houses the Aman resort. Built in the 16th century, the Palazzo features also two gardens, which is quite an interesting phenomenon, because rarely you’ll see green oasis in this city. At the hotel, one arrives (as expected) by boat. As soon as you step inside, the atmosphere overwhelms you. Frescos, reliefs, chandeliers, ballrooms, exclusive furniture – everything exudes luxury and elegance. Some of the rooms provide amazing views of the Grand Canal. Each room is unique and exclusive: from high ceilings to spectacular chandeliers, fireplaces like works of art, frescos and amazing decorations. Aman Canal Grande Hotel Italy Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Aman Canale Grande Hotel Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Grace Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Interior Aman Canal Grande Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Baroque  Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Ceiling Detail Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Sobriety Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Room With Decorations Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Library 1 Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Lovely Interior1 Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Chandelier Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Window View Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Library 1 Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Elegance Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Arts Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Opulence Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Details Room Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Details 2 Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Corner Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Bedroom3 Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Bathroom8 Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Neutral Nuances  Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Neutral Details Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Garden View Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways Beautiful Green Space Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways

You're reading Exclusive Aman Canale Grande Hotel in the City of Love and Waterways originally posted on Freshome.

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Mary Logan Is Dripping In Color

Mary Logan Is Dripping In Color

Mary Logan is a New Orleans based visual artist and an art educator who paints at the Aquarium Gallery and Studios. Her work is interesting in that despite the threads of bright, even neon, hues, the overall effect is somewhat moody, with plenty of blues, black, and gray, grounding the pieces. We made palettes of her abstract (some more than others) works using Colourlovers for this week’s CMYLK.

Mary Logan Is Dripping In Color in art Category

Mary Logan Is Dripping In Color in art Category








Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur

Architects: poly.m.ur
Location: , South Korea
Design Team: Seungjun Oh, Sunki Whang, Jaeho Song, Hyunju Lim, Jiin Kim
Area: 208.02 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Kyungsub Shin

Contractor: AI plus
M&E Engineer: Seorim Bangjae

From the architect. Honeybee Lounge is the nickname upon new multiplex cinemas located in Ilsan, one of satellite cities near Seoul. In general, new towns such as Ilsan built in the late 80’s, still following the modernistic regime, do not have evenly distributed open spaces. In other words while they have a gigantic central park in the middle of city, only limited green areas are provided near their community. In the end everyday life is not mixed so well with exterior activity to the extent that they prefer artificially controlled environments such as shopping malls to nature.

Taking this unbalanced public space as one of serious urban problems in Korea, we have been looking for the way how to utilize commercial spaces such as multiplex cinemas for the community. Would it be feasible to create a symbiotic relationship between commercial space and the public without asking for sacrifice? Honeybee Lounge is a proposal to counteract this urban problem for not merely those who use it as a cinema hall but also those who would like to engage in their community.

Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur © Kyungsub Shin Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur Floor Plan Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur Floor Plan Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur Floor Plan Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur Section Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur Section Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur Section Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur Section Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur Elevation

Hinterland Design Collection

Hinterland Design Collection

Visual artist, designer, and builder Riley McFerrin’s career has taken him through various cities and down multiple creative paths, all leading to his settling into the forests of British Columbia where the Hinterland Design aesthetic was born. The collection, inspired by hinterland (a region lying inland from a coast, as the dictionary says), is a series of functional objects for the home that double as art and “marry a modernist aesthetic with the spirit of the frontier.”

Hinterland Design Collection in home furnishings Category

Each design helps bring a little bit of the outdoors to the inside through the use of natural materials, like wood, and their organic, sculptural shapes.

Hinterland Design Collection in home furnishings Category

Scatter/Gather Pendant Light
A pendant named after the materials it’s made from – scattered wooden branches along the Pacific shoreline that are gathered up.

Hinterland Design Collection in home furnishings Category

Hinterland Design Collection in home furnishings Category

Hinterland Design Collection in home furnishings Category

Little Gem
A side table and sculpture for the indoors or out, all rolled into one crystalline-shaped form.

Hinterland Design Collection in home furnishings Category

Hinterland Design Collection in home furnishings Category

Hinterland Design Collection in home furnishings Category

Nurselog
A dual-purpose side table that can be used inside or out. Looks similar to the rainforest stumps that tend to grow moss and ferns from their tops, so this piece has a place to add a living element to its surface.

Hinterland Design Collection in home furnishings Category

Hinterland Design Collection in home furnishings Category

Good Side
Having one “good side”, this simple coffee table features diagonal slats on one side that reveal light through the gaps. The gaps are filled with either bright pink or matte black.

Hinterland Design Collection in home furnishings Category

Hinterland Design Collection in home furnishings Category

Scrimshaw
A tripod side table and reading lamp combined into one elegant form.








How to Bring China’s Ghost Towns Back to Life

In this article, originally published in ’s Point of View blog as “The Real Problem with China’s Ghost Towns” , author Peter Calthorpe explains the problems of these cities, predicts their grim future, and explores how the thoughtful planning behind the city of Chenggong could provide a more sustainable alternative. 

We’ve all seen the reports on “ghost town” developments in , showing acres of empty high-rise apartments and vacant shopping malls. These barren towns seem particularly ironic in a country planning to move 250 million people from the countryside to cities in the next 20 years. But this massive, unprecedented demand has been distorted by a number of factors unique to . Flawed financial incentives for cities and developers, along with the poor phasing of services, amenities, and jobs create most of the problems. In addition, ’s emerging middle class is very comfortable (perhaps too comfortable) investing in real estate, so people often buy apartments in incomplete communities but don’t move in, expecting that values will rise, or that they will live there someday. The result is a string of large, empty developments that remain speculative investments rather than real homes and communities. [See-through buildings are the worry now, but the real problems may come when they are full.]

While it’s hard to get data on vacancy levels in China, there are certainly many anecdotal examples across the country. An all-too-typical example is Chenggong, the new town planned for 1.5 million just outside of Kunming in the west. This freshly minted city boasts the growing Yunnan University, currently with 170,000 students and faculty; a new government center; and an emerging light industrial area. Under construction are the city’s new high-speed rail station and two metro lines connecting the historic city center.

The town has been growing at a robust 6% a year. There seems to be lots of activity to prime the pump, but even here there are scores of vacant buildings. Why? Foremost is Chinese tax policy: there are no local property taxes so cities derive most of their income from developing land. The incentive is to lease large tracts of land (land sales are illegal in China), even if the market and complementary services aren’t ready. Without an ongoing property tax, the long-term viability of the towns is a secondary consideration. Compounding this, the average Chinese worker, with their high savings rate, needs investment options. Lacking a transparent stock market, most workers prefer to own real estate if they can, both as an investment and as future home for a child. They often buy with cash, and with no debt and no property tax it’s easy to hold empty apartments. Additionally, the country has yet to see a drop in real estate values so the properties seem safe. (Sound familiar?)

In addition to these buy-now financial incentives, the transit in Chenggong isn’t complete, and many of the town’s services and schools are yet to come. Consequently, many people purchase apartments but stay in their old homes until the new community is complete or their child marries. The good news here: these tax, investment, and development policies can be easily corrected, and in fact the central government is considering new property taxes, limits to second home speculation, and a more strategic phasing of infrastructure.

Perhaps more significant than these market irregularities and flawed policies is the long-term viability and health of the new towns. Most development in China takes the form of superblocks with towers in the park-style gated communities.  At up to a quarter of a mile to an intersection and often eight lanes of automobile traffic across the street, walking and biking in these districts is difficult and dangerous. Driving then skyrockets worsening congestion, air pollution, carbon emissions, and household costs. In Jinan, a study showed a quadrupling of auto travel in the newer superblock developments.

In addition to these growing economic and environmental issues, these developments—some containing more than 5,000 dwellings—hold the seeds of rapid social decay. As we experienced in the West, this urban pattern isolates people in huge impersonal landscapes that lack identity, safety (no “eyes on the street”), community, and a human scale. We demolished a generation of social housing built on this model, and I believe the Chinese eventually will too.

Fortunately, Chenggong is experimenting with a new model of urban planning. With support from the national government and planning by the China Sustainable Transportation Center, our firm is redesigning 2,500 acres in the central district of the new town. The superblocks have been broken down to human-scale, traditional courtyard blocks.  The streets are smaller and more frequent—and many are auto free or dedicated for transit.  Parks are smaller but closer and safer with housing overlooking each.  Mixed-use buildings with sidewalk oriented shops and cafes rebuild the street-life that was once a hallmark of older Chinese communities. And ultimately jobs will balance with housing, avoiding the “bedroom community” disease that eroded suburbs all over the world.

This new pattern is in its “pilot” phase with government officials studying the results and policy implications. But there is every reason to believe timely corrections can be made, both in the incentives that distort the market and, perhaps most important, in China’s new cities. Creating the appropriate design DNA as well as the proper economic incentives will profoundly impact the long-term social, economic and environmental viability of urban centers that will be the largest and fastest growing in the history of mankind. For all of our sakes, let’s hope China gets it right.

Peter Calthorpe, a Berkeley-based architect and planner, heads up Calthorpe Associates. He is a founding member of the Congress for the New Urbanism and the author of several books, including his latest, Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change.

S2V 2013

S2V-02-BUILD
[Photo Credit: BUILD LLC]

For the past few years, a regular rhythm within our summer activities has been our annual charity ride from BUILD World Headquarters in Seattle up to Vancouver, British Columbia. We’re happy to report that the 2013 Seattle to Vancouver (S2V) invitational ride was an extraordinary success. All 22 cyclists crossed the 188 mile finish line with style: there wasn’t a single crash, the weather was pristine, and we raised over $28,000 for homeless mothers and children in Seattle. What an extraordinary way to build camaraderie, support a cause and get some exercise while you’re at it. Three birds, one stone — sign us up for next year! (For a peek at previous rides, check out our posts from years one, two, and three.)

S2V-04-BUILD
Top row L to R: Mike Abrahamson, Jeff Johnson, Andrew van Leeuwen, Kevin Eckert, Harry Arnold, Duff Bangs, T.A. McCann, Gary Plaunt, Greg Plaunt, Joe Kilbourne; Middle row L to R: Bill Reilly, Kristen McNeely, Sarah Holberg, Aaron Pambianco, Muffy Ritz, Glo Kimball; Sitting L to R: Chris Robinson, Carey Moran, Brian Boram, Bill Wiegand, Albert Shumm, Michael Smith, Bill Schlitter

S2V-01-BUILD
[Photo Credit: BUILD LLC]

Each year the ride becomes that much more important to our community for a variety of reasons. There’s always a need for additional resources within the social-profit organizations in town, and fostering these groups is a vital part of our social responsibility. The benefits of keeping fit are central to a healthy lifestyle (we’re not getting any younger) and it feels exceptional to be in peak performance at the height of summer. It’s also a great excuse to catch up with our pals and, with everyone’s busy schedule, S2V is one of the few opportunities each year that we get to spend time with some of our favorite people. The ride grows in number each year, and we’re looking forward to the 5 year marker in 2014.

S2V-01-Brian-Boram
[Photo Credit: Brian Boram]

S2V-01-Bill-Reilly
[Photo Credit: Bill Reilly]

Along with all of the charity, fitness and fun, S2V also takes a lot of action from both individuals and groups, and we’re grateful to each and every one of them. Here’s the play-by-play of how it all comes together:

We selected The Hope Center in downtown Seattle as the beneficiary for the second year in a row because their mission is so vital to the well-being of our city. For those of you not familiar with the organization, The Hope Center is a social-profit organization that provides a safe refuge for homeless mothers; they are committed to respect, dignity, hope, and compassion and we are entirely on board with those qualities. You can always give to the Hope Center on their website — bonus points for doing so in the name of S2V.

S2V-04-Kathleen
[Photo Credit: Kathleen Jones]

This year’s jersey is the product of the talented team over at JL Velo and some elbow grease from our man Charles Caldwell at BUILD World Headquarters. Being the design snobs that we are, the jersey is a considered and careful design process, and JL Velo’s David Fleischhauer did an excellent job of taking care of us — give them a shout if you’re in the market for jerseys.

S2V-Jersey-Front

S2V-Jersey-Back
[Image Credit: BUILD LLC]

One of the best parts of the ride is the day one lunch provided by Picnic in Seattle. Owner/chefs Jenny and Anson prepared delicious sandwiches, salads and snacks for the hungry crew and our noon-time appetites were highly appreciative of people who know good, healthy food. If you live in Seattle and have not visited their Phinney Ridge shop, you are missing out on a hot spot for food and wine.

S2V-03-BUILD
[Photo Credit: BUILD LLC]

Dinner on day one is always a celebrated event and Acme Farms and Kitchen in Bellingham didn’t let us down. A private family-style dinner was just what the doctor ordered after 108 miles of pedaling and the unforgiving terrain of Chuckanut Drive.

S2V-01-Jeff-Johnson
[Photo Credit: Jeff Johnson]

S2V-04-Brian-Boram
[Photo Credit: Brian Boram]

A big thanks goes out to Kevin Eckert for his organizational skills, to Josiah Johnson for making the hospitality arrangements, to Brian Boram for organizing the donations, and to BUILD intern Carey Moran who stepped up at the last minute to drive the team van. Also, a big thanks to Canada for hosting us.

S2V-02-Bill-Reilly
[Photo Credit: Bill Reilly]

S2V-03-Kathleen
[Photo Credit: Kathleen Jones]

Perhaps the most touching aspect of the entire ride is the trust that people put in us. The donations that friends, family and colleagues provided were just astounding this year. It was an absolute privilege representing these individuals; they’ve made a profound difference in our lives and they’ve caused positive change in our community. The following groups have our utmost gratitude:

The benchmark generosity that Greg & Margo Plaunt via their company Welland provided with a large donation (nearly ¼ of our total) undoubtedly spurred on our top donors, Bill Wiegand, and Paul Sturm & Flora Ling, to unforeseen levels of generosity.

Other companies that contributed at our $1000 sponsorship level include AJP Engineering, Bill Reilly Design, KMS Financial Services, RMB Vivid, Society Consulting and our very own BUILD LLC and Special Projects Division LLC.

We also had the generous support of previous individuals who were kind enough to give again this year including Albert Shum, Gavin Shearer & Elaine Chu, T. A. McCann, Ryan Linton, Leen Kashyap, Chase & Kate Jarvis, J. Michael Smith and Ten Pachi Salon.

Lastly, we welcome a series of new fundraisers including Modern Metal LLC, Harry & Caron Arnold, Helen Nelson and other thoughtful family members.

S2V-01-Duff-Bangs
[Photo Credit: Duff Bangs]

S2V-02-Duff-Bangs
[Photo Credit: Duff Bangs]

Cheers from Team S2V

Friday Five with Ilkka Suppanen of Studio Suppanen

Friday Five with Ilkka Suppanen of Studio Suppanen

Designer Ilkka Suppanen sits at the head of the class when it comes to Finnish design. Leading Helsinki’s Studio Suppanen since 1995, the designer has leant his skills to top-notch companies like Artek, Axis, Cappellini, Nokia, and Saab over the years. His well-rounded firm handles everything from interiors, architecture, and product design, covering the gamut and keeping their toes in all the design ponds. With countless awards under his belt, Suppanen continues to be a leader with some of the best, and most innovative, designs that Finland has to offer. Curious as to what keeps this busy designer inspired? This week’s Friday Five sheds some light.

1. Here are classic 12 meter wooden yachts in competition. I love the slender lines of the old yachts. For me it is amazing that sailing as an action has been basically the same since human beings went on the water with vessels.

2. This is a new boat that hydrofoils. It is like an insect or small animal that skims over the water. I have always been interested in technology that uses the forces of nature and lives in beautiful relationship with nature.

3. I love these container ships. They are so functional and whiteout aesthetics consideration: That they somehow become great because of that. Somehow the aesthetics kills natural beauty of objects.

4. I live the viking boats: They are so much more slender, faster, and lighter than the ships created later, like the ones Columbus used for exploring the new continent. I love this strategic approach to be lighter and faster.

5. Recent racing yachts remind me of a huge ballet dancer. It is dancing on the top of the water balancing the forces of wind, water, and waves. I really appreciate the brave and fearless people who are pushing something so traditional as a sailing boat beyond the boundaries of tradition.








Itahye Residence / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura

Architects: Apiacás Arquitetos,
Location: Santana do Parnaíba
Project Architects: Anderson Fabiano Freitas, Juliana Antunes
Project Team: Acácia Furuya, Pedro Barros, Cristina de Brito
Collaborators: Cibele Mion, Francisco Veloso, Otávio Filho, Pedro Paredes, Yuri Faustinoni
Project Area: 350 sqm
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Pregnolato & Kusuki

Construction: Apiacás Arquitetos

From the architect. Designed to be located in a suburb in the city of Santana do Parnaíba, in the state of São Paulo, the development of the project for this home was possible thanks to the collaboration of the client, who in an unusual way in these situations, considered positive the hypothesis of living in a house designed in a way to establish a clearer relationship to the street.

Another important issue was the desire to establish greater contact with the ground, as the lot had a steep slope. Thus, the project was designed from overlapping and perpendicular prisms, that according to their orientation, sometimes come into contact with the ground, and sometimes generate small courtyards.

The first prism, parallel to the street and in contact with the ground, contains the leisure area, sauna, jacuzzi and lounge, in addition to the entire infrastructure of the house (tanks, pumps and filters). The pool covers these areas.

The second prism, perpendicular to the street, contains all private and service areas; rooms, laundry, and TV room, which are at the same level as the garage. They are connected by a circulation around the courtyard, which in turn connects to the leisure area.

The roof slab determines the level of the living room and extends to the public promenade generating an internal street, and consequently another elevated courtyard with a direct view of the landscape .

Both prisms are enclosed by two parallel frames perpendicular to the street, which are the boundaries between internal and external areas. They are connected by an open passageway (the elevated courtyard) and another closed one (metal bridge), that link the following related programs: the first frame, closest to the access road, contains the kitchen and entrance courtyard, in the second frame are the living and dining rooms respectively.

The dining room is at half the level of the living room, and therefore serves as intermediate floor between the leisure, private, and kitchen areas.

The gap between the living room and the kitchen forms a suspended courtyard, facing the main view of the house: a large nature preserve that draws the landscape and turns out to be an important element guiding this project. The house was built in reinforced concrete and metallic frames, glass, and wood.

Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura Sketch Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura Sketch Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura © Pregnolato & Kusuki Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura Sketch Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura Sketch Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura Plan Level 1 Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura Site Plan Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura Plan Level -1 Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura Plan Level 0 Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura Southwest Facade Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura West Facade Residência Itahye / Apiacás Arquitetos + Brito Antunes Arquitetura Longitudinal Section

PROJECTiONE’s Engrained Parametrics

Brought to you with support from:   Designers in Indianapolis fabricate a graphic, splintered design. Indiana-based design/build studio PROJECTiONE employs a multidisciplinary approach to its work that runs the gamut from digital to analog fabrication. Founders Adam Buente and Kyle Perry craftily bridged that gap with Synthetic Grain, a set piece for the Young & […]