First Images of What is Set to Become the Largest Botanic Garden in the World Revealed

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Exterior view of Northern Habitat Biome. Image via ©Arup/Grimshaw Exterior view of Northern Habitat Biome. Image via ©Arup/Grimshaw Bold, innovative and set to become the largest botanic garden in the world, images of Oman’s future light-filled oasis in the desert have been revealed. A collaboration between Arup, Grimshaw, and Haley Sharpe Design delivers the architecture, engineering, landscaping, and interpretive design in a scheme of over 420 hectares for the Oman Botanic Garden.
Aerial View. Image via ©Arup/Grimshaw Aerial View. Image via ©Arup/Grimshaw

The gardens, with guidance offered by His Majesty Sultan Qaboos bin Said Al Said will celebrate the country’s botanic diversity in the foothills of the Al Hajar Mountains. Here, an ancient seabed is still visible after it was elevated to 100m above sea level by tectonic activity. The scheme uses the diverse landscape to its advantage, working within the undulating land and natural ridges and ravines to generate walkways and inform building elements.

Exterior view of the Southern Habitat Biome. Image via ©Arup/Grimshaw Exterior view of the Southern Habitat Biome.
Southern Habitat Biome. Image via ©Arup/Grimshaw
Northern Habitat Biome. Image via ©Arup/Grimshaw
Habitats Pavilion. Image via ©Arup/Grimshaw
Visitor's Centre pavilions and cable car structure. Image via ©Arup/Grimshaw
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Satellite Images Ranks Europe’s Greenest (and Not so Green) Cities

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Courtesy of Philipp Gärtner Courtesy of Philipp Gärtner

With a growing global trend of rural to urban migration, a focus on an understanding of parks, gardens and general green space in city centers is more important than ever. While a move to an urban center can offer improved access to employment, schooling, healthcare and cultural opportunities, it can come at a cost of increased stress and noise and decreased access to open space, fresh air and nature. For urban and forestry researcher Phillipp Gärtner, this raised the question of which European capital cities have the greenest space.

Courtesy of Philipp Gärtner Courtesy of Philipp Gärtner

Using a method that processes satellite imagery and detects pixel types, Gärtner has generated the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) for 43 of Europe’s capital cities. The NDVI analyses remote sensing measurements to determine whether a target area contains live vegetation or not. For consistency, the area analyzed is a 5-mile radius

Courtesy of Philipp Gärtner
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Take in The Views With This Prefabricated Curved Glass Sliding Doors

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Courtesy of LUMISHELL Courtesy of LUMISHELL Born from a system of sliding, curved glass doors, and inspired by its potential presence in nature, this house takes new technology and uses it in a beautiful way. LUMISHELL is a collaboration between a young engineer and architect, Christophe Benichou, and LUMICENE, a company developing curved and reversible glass windows.  The result is a small, pre-fabricated accommodation unit that capitalizes on the nature of the curved windows to generate living and bedroom spaces.  The house rolls in on itself, creating privacy between the three areas and allowing the full rotation of the windows, which can spin to open up each wing to the outside.
Courtesy of LUMISHELL Courtesy of LUMISHELL

The effect is a kind of cocoon-like curved pavilion. Private and open, compact and airy, mirrors are strategically placed to bring the panoramic views inside and speak to the aluminum-clad skin of the exterior.

Courtesy of LUMISHELL Courtesy of LUMISHELL
Courtesy of LUMISHELL
Courtesy of LUMISHELL
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You Can Now Buy a Shipping-Container Tiny House from Amazon (But Should You?)

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via Amazon via Amazon The conversion of shipping containers to living spaces is not a new concept—but being able to purchase them online and have them delivered by e-commerce giant Amazon is. Deliveries by the Seattle-based (and seemingly endlessly expanding) company are becoming a staple for most American households: dogs have never barked so much at the postman, porches have never been so littered with empty boxes, and never before has almost every product on the market been available from one place without even having to leave the house. In spite of this consumer revolution, homes on demand constitutes new territory for the platform. So what does it look like when an entire house is delivered on the back of a truck?
via Amazon via Amazon

MODS International, a third party Wisconsin-based seller on Amazon, are now offering fully converted new shipping containers complete with a bedroom, a shower, a toilet, a

via Amazon
via Amazon
via Amazon
via Amazon
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LA’s Natural History Museum to Expand With Transparent “Front Porch” Additions

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Natural History Museum West Wing at Night (view from southwest): From the exterior, passers-by can view the museum’s new public facilities, including a flexible theater and an interdisciplinary education center for urban nature, culture, and history. A rooftop restaurant offers panoramic vistas of the Los Angeles basin that include the Downtown skyline, San Gabriel Mountains, Baldwin Hills and the Santa Monica Mountains.. Image Courtesy of Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Natural History Museum West Wing at Night (view from southwest): From the exterior, passers-by can view the museum’s new public facilities, including a flexible theater and an interdisciplinary education center for urban nature, culture, and history. A rooftop restaurant offers panoramic vistas of the Los Angeles basin that include the Downtown skyline, San Gabriel Mountains, Baldwin Hills and the Santa Monica Mountains.. Image Courtesy of Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (NHM) has released concept designs for the new NHM West/South Project – a scheme designed by LA firm Frederick Fisher and Partners (FF&P) in the first step towards a 10-year revitalization of the NHM as Exposition Park’s historic hub. The extensions would focus on the west and south sides of the museum, supporting new uses and reimagining the programs and spaces of its famous Ice Age fossil site at the La

NHM South Façade (south elevation): The museum’s southwestern perimeter is re-envisioned as a welcoming “front porch” extending from Bill Robertson Lane to the existing South Entrance. Along this accessible path, a new Welcome Center and redesigned circulation and landscape elements create a more seamless transition between indoors and out, increasing the museum’s connection to the community and making it a true urban “place.”. Image Courtesy of Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
 New Lobby, Welcome Center and Theater Entrance: A new entrance on the southwest corner provides direct access from Exposition Park’s South Lawn into NHM’s new immersive theater for performances, screenings, lectures, satellite-transmitted scientific expeditions from around the world, and a variety of community gatherings. Visually and physically connected to the existing museum building’s ground level temporary exhibition Gallery and first floor Welcome Center loggia, this new entrance also allows for access to the theater and restaurant outside of museum hours.. Image Courtesy of Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
Courtesy of Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
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S9 Architecture’s Dock 72 Tops Out in Brooklyn

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Courtesy of S9 Architecture Courtesy of S9 Architecture S9 Architecture’s Dock 72, a 17-storey commercial office project expected to bring 4,000 workers to the Brooklyn Navy Yard area, has been topped out this month marking the completion of the building’s steel superstructure. Over 350 construction workers, local business leaders, community representatives and public officials attended the ceremony, which ended with the raising of the final beam signed by all the members of the Dock 72 team.
Courtesy of S9 Architecture Courtesy of S9 Architecture
Courtesy of S9 Architecture Courtesy of S9 Architecture

With completion expected in the summer of 2018, the project is part of an ongoing commercial renewal at the Yard, serving as a hub for emerging creative and technology industries. There is a focus on urban and public amenity to encourage innovation and collaboration between occupants, with the inclusion of a specialty food hall, a health and wellness center, a conference centre, multiple lounges for socializing and meetings, a

Courtesy of S9 Architecture
Courtesy of S9 Architecture
Continue reading "S9 Architecture’s Dock 72 Tops Out in Brooklyn"

S9 Architecture’s Dock 72 Tops Out in Brooklyn

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Courtesy of S9 Architecture Courtesy of S9 Architecture S9 Architecture’s Dock 72, a 17-storey commercial office project expected to bring 4,000 workers to the Brooklyn Navy Yard area, has been topped out this month marking the completion of the building’s steel superstructure. Over 350 construction workers, local business leaders, community representatives and public officials attended the ceremony, which ended with the raising of the final beam signed by all the members of the Dock 72 team.
Courtesy of S9 Architecture Courtesy of S9 Architecture
Courtesy of S9 Architecture Courtesy of S9 Architecture

With completion expected in the summer of 2018, the project is part of an ongoing commercial renewal at the Yard, serving as a hub for emerging creative and technology industries. There is a focus on urban and public amenity to encourage innovation and collaboration between occupants, with the inclusion of a specialty food hall, a health and wellness center, a conference centre, multiple lounges for socializing and meetings, a

Courtesy of S9 Architecture
Courtesy of S9 Architecture
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Cardboard Pavilion “Get High Without Drugs” Wins FabFest Prize

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Quirky, innovative and visceral, Get High without Drugs was awarded first place in the fabrication category at this year’s International Fabrication Festival (FabFest) in London.  Mollusk-like and mysterious from the outside, the form of the pavilion emerges from the combination of a zonohedron and a dome. Seventy-two hexagonal surfaces were formulated into fold-able nets that could then be digitally fabricated from flat-sheets and assembled into load-bearing modules. A puzzle-like routine drove the assembly of the modules into the pavilion’s dome-like form.
© GET HIGH WITHOUT DRUGS © GET HIGH WITHOUT DRUGS
© GET HIGH WITHOUT DRUGS © GET HIGH WITHOUT DRUGS

Each module was constructed using corrugated cardboard and a reflective film lines the interior, turning the space into a kaleidoscope, and reflecting, warping and distorting what’s going on around it. The visual illusions and disorientation generated by the interior space engaged visitors in a colorful and diverse experience, altering their perspective of the outside world. The ever-changing colors

Modelo impreso en 3D. Image © GET HIGH WITHOUT DRUGS
Top / Bottom View
Elevation
Components
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Cambridge To Oxford Connection: Ideas Competition Reveals Gallery of Finalists

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© Shortlisted Teams and Malcom Reading Consultants © Shortlisted Teams and Malcom Reading Consultants The National Infrastructure Commission and Malcolm Reading Consultants have revealed an online gallery of the four final design concepts for The Cambridge to Oxford Connection: Ideas Competition. The competition, which launched in June, focuses on the 130-mile corridor connecting Cambridge, Milton Keyes, Northampton, and Oxford. It acknowledges the presence of world-leading universities, highly skilled workers and tech firms, but also the corridor’s failure to function as a connected economic zone. A total of 58 teams from the UK and abroad entered the competition, anonymously submitting proposals for how the corridor might be developed in the future. A jury of leaders in the areas of economics, infrastructure, design, and placemaking announced the shortlist in August and the winner of the competition is expected to be announced next month. The four finalists are:

Barton Willmore – The CaMKoX Innovation Hive Delivery Guide
© Barton Willmore and Malcolm Reading Consultants
© Barton Willmore and Malcolm Reading Consultants
© Fletcher Priest Architects and Malcolm Reading Consultants
© Fletcher Priest Architects and Malcolm Reading Consultants
© Mae and Malcolm Reading Consultants
© Mae and Malcolm Reading Consultants
© Tibbalds Planning & Urban Design, Mikhail Riches, Featherstone Young, Marko and Placemakers, Expedition Engineering & Khaa and Malcolm Reading Consultants
© Tibbalds Planning & Urban Design, Mikhail Riches, Featherstone Young, Marko and Placemakers, Expedition Engineering & Khaa and Malcolm Reading Consultants
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