These CNC Prototypes Were 3-D Mapped From Natural Forms

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Ishi Kiri / Fasetto. Image Courtesy of Anoma Ishi Kiri / Fasetto. Image Courtesy of Anoma

Anoma, headed by EDIDA-winning Indian artist Ruchika Grover, is a product design studio that explores the potential of natural stone. Its surfaces, sculptures, and installations, are created through a unique process, which combines digital manufacturing and traditional hand craftsmanship. 

Proceso de Fabricación. Image Courtesy of Anoma Proceso de Fabricación. Image Courtesy of Anoma

Grover usually begins by illustrating rough concepts on paper. She is continually inspired by natural forms and textures which manifest strongly in Anoma’s work. For example, the studio’s Foliage collection of surfaces highlights the often overlooked vein patterns on leaves. During its conceptualization, six species of plants were shortlisted – the Bodhi, the Maple, the Monstera, the Birch, the Elm, and the Lily – and samples of their leaves were three-dimensionally mapped in the studio. Next, informed by extensive botanical studies, Grover interpreted the natural vein networks into subtle patterns, sizably scaling them

Foliage / Maple. Image Courtesy of Anoma
Ishi Kiri / Rokakku. Image Courtesy of Anoma
The breathing surfaces / Xylem. Image Courtesy of Anoma
Foliage / Birch. Image Courtesy of Anoma
Kinetic #07. Image Courtesy of Anoma
Continue reading "These CNC Prototypes Were 3-D Mapped From Natural Forms"

8 Annoying Things All Architects Do

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© Andrea Vasquez © Andrea Vasquez Contrary to how Hollywood movies portray the quintessential architect—creative, sensitive, and virtually flawless—architects are a diverse bunch of fallible people. This stems from the fact that the study and practice of architecture are wrought with several “perils.” Architecture school is a beast, if not the profession at large, and it essentially reinvents the psyche of its students by simultaneously breaking them down and building them up—say hello to unresolved issues! While this process produces bright intellectuals with a deep understanding of architecture’s place in society, it can also end up shaping architects into pretentious snobs. Young architects invariably graduate with a distinct outlook on life. Pair that with a largely thankless job and architects soon discover that they can only relate to other architects. Rare friends who bravely stand by an architect through thick and thin deserve a strong pat on the back because architects, despite
© Andrea Vasquez
© Andrea Vasquez
© Andrea Vasquez
© Andrea Vasquez
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Massive River Development Plan Hopes to Rejuvenate India’s Relationship to the Ganges

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View of the Ghats. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis View of the Ghats. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis Delhi-based firm Morphogenesis has recently completed a proposal for a project that will rehabilitate and develop the ghats (a flight of steps leading down to a river) and crematoriums along a 210-kilometer stretch of the Ganges, India’s longest river. The project, titled “A River in Need,” is part of the larger National Mission of Clean Ganga (NMCG), an undertaking of the Indian Government’s Ministry of Water Resources which was formed in 2011 with twin objectives: to ensure effective abatement of the river’s pollution and to conserve and rejuvenate it.
View of the Ghats. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis View of the Ghats. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis

The Ganges is venerated as a living goddess by India’s 966 million Hindus who strongly believe in the river’s self-healing properties; to have one’s ashes scattered in the river is symbolic of achieving eternal liberation from the cycle of reincarnation. But

Typical Ghat on Low Water Level. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Ganges and the Hindu Tradition. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Intervention Zones. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Hydrological Issues. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
View of the Crematorium. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Typical Ghat on Normal Water Level. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Colonnades for Uninterrupted Water Flow. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Sectional Organization of Program. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Smart Columns to Create Shaded Space. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Continue reading "Massive River Development Plan Hopes to Rejuvenate India’s Relationship to the Ganges"

Massive River Development Plan Hopes to Rejuvenate India’s Relationship to the Ganges

    <figure>
View of the Ghats. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis View of the Ghats. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis Delhi-based firm Morphogenesis has recently completed a proposal for a project that will rehabilitate and develop the ghats (a flight of steps leading down to a river) and crematoriums along a 210-kilometer stretch of the Ganges, India’s longest river. The project, titled “A River in Need,” is part of the larger National Mission of Clean Ganga (NMCG), an undertaking of the Indian Government’s Ministry of Water Resources which was formed in 2011 with twin objectives: to ensure effective abatement of the river’s pollution and to conserve and rejuvenate it.
View of the Ghats. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis View of the Ghats. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis

The Ganges is venerated as a living goddess by India’s 966 million Hindus who strongly believe in the river’s self-healing properties; to have one’s ashes scattered in the river is symbolic of achieving eternal liberation from the cycle of reincarnation. But

Typical Ghat on Low Water Level. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Ganges and the Hindu Tradition. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Intervention Zones. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Hydrological Issues. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
View of the Crematorium. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Typical Ghat on Normal Water Level. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Colonnades for Uninterrupted Water Flow. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Sectional Organization of Program. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Smart Columns to Create Shaded Space. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Continue reading "Massive River Development Plan Hopes to Rejuvenate India’s Relationship to the Ganges"

Massive River Development Plan Hopes to Rejuvenate India’s Relationship to the Ganges

    <figure>
View of the Ghats. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis View of the Ghats. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis Delhi-based firm Morphogenesis has recently completed a proposal for a project that will rehabilitate and develop the ghats (a flight of steps leading down to a river) and crematoriums along a 210-kilometer stretch of the Ganges, India’s longest river. The project, titled “A River in Need,” is part of the larger National Mission of Clean Ganga (NMCG), an undertaking of the Indian Government’s Ministry of Water Resources which was formed in 2011 with twin objectives: to ensure effective abatement of the river’s pollution and to conserve and rejuvenate it.
View of the Ghats. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis View of the Ghats. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis

The Ganges is venerated as a living goddess by India’s 966 million Hindus who strongly believe in the river’s self-healing properties; to have one’s ashes scattered in the river is symbolic of achieving eternal liberation from the cycle of reincarnation. But

Typical Ghat on Low Water Level. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Ganges and the Hindu Tradition. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Intervention Zones. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Hydrological Issues. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
View of the Crematorium. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Typical Ghat on Normal Water Level. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Colonnades for Uninterrupted Water Flow. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Sectional Organization of Program. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Smart Columns to Create Shaded Space. Image Courtesy of Morphogenesis
Continue reading "Massive River Development Plan Hopes to Rejuvenate India’s Relationship to the Ganges"

A Tour Through the Many Doorways of India

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Pahara Village in Uttar Pradesh. Image © Priyanshi Singhal Pahara Village in Uttar Pradesh. Image © Priyanshi Singhal The door: despite being one of the most fundamental architectural elements, the immense significance these portals hold in architecture and culture can hardly be questioned. Historically, empires erected gigantic gateways to welcome visitors and religious shrines installed doors with ornate embellishments to ward off evil just as contemporary governments have built arches to commemorate important events. In this photo-series, however, architect Priyanshi Singhal directs her focus to doors in a humbler vein—those of homes and hole-in-the-wall shops. Armed with her camera, she travels through narrow winding streets in age-old Indian towns and villages—characterized by their mixed land-use—as she studies and documents the inherent relationship between architectural tradition, culture, and a people. A door and its chaukhat (threshold) hold deep spiritual meaning in India’s traditional vastu shastra system of architecture. Furthermore, Singhal’s work provides us a brief glimpse of the
Gokul, Mathura. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pushkar. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Old Bhopal. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pedhambli Village in Gujarat. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Mathura. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Kolkata. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Gokul, Mathura. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Kolkata. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Ahmedabad. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pedhambli Village in Gujarat. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Gokul, Mathura. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Ahmedabad. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Mathura. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pushkar. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Kolkata. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pushkar. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Kolkata. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pedhambli Village in Gujarat. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Mathura. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pushkar. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pushkar. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Old Bhopal. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pedhambli Village in Gujarat. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pedhambli Village in Gujarat. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pushkar. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pushkar. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pahara Village in Uttar Pradesh. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Kolkata. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Ahmedabad. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pushkar. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pushkar. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pushkar. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
Pushkar. Image © Priyanshi Singhal
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Bauhaus Houses, Eritrea’s Capital and Ahmadabad’s Walled City Among 20 Cultural Sites Added to UNESCO’s World Heritage List

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Jama Masjid, Ahmadabad. Image© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jama_Masjid,_Ahmedabad_01.jpg'>Wikimedia user Bernard Gagnon</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.5</a> Jama Masjid, Ahmadabad. Image© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jama_Masjid,_Ahmedabad_01.jpg'>Wikimedia user Bernard Gagnon</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.5</a> UNESCO’s World Heritage Committee, currently holding its forty-first annual session in the Polish city of Krakow, inscribed twenty new cultural sites on its World Heritage List, including the historic city of Ahmedabad in India, archaeological sites in Cambodia and Brazil, and a “cultural landscape” in South Africa. The Committee also added extensions to two sites already on the list: Strasbourg in France, and the Bauhaus in Germany. On the other hand, the historic center of Vienna was inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger as the Committee examined the state of conservation of one-hundred-and-fifty-four of its listed sites.
Teen Darwaza, one of the walled city's gates. Image© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Teen-Darwaza.jpg'>Wikimedia user Nichalp</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.5</a> Teen Darwaza, one of the walled city's gates. Image© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Teen-Darwaza.jpg'>Wikimedia user Nichalp</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/deed.en'>CC
Jaali at Sidi Saiyyad Mosque. Image© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jali_at_Sidi_Saiyyed_Mosque_02.jpg'>Wikimedia user Bernard Gagnon</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 2.5</a>
Valongo Wharf Archaeological Site. Image© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cais_do_Valongo_e_da_Imperatriz.jpg'>Wikimedia user Halley Pacheco de Oliveira</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Asmara. Image© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Asmara_(8351468351).jpg'>Wikimedia user David Stanley</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Tarnowskie Góry Lead-Silver-Zinc Mine. Image© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/polandmfa/8231434027/in/photolist-dxofyk-dxof8t-dxofCX-gShjMH-o3Ri8H-a2fT2K-9Y1Ekt-6WLC5j-a2iJ1o-a2g2di-9Y1Dp6-a2fSfa-a2fMXe-a2fJG2-a2iUvf-a2fNz4-a2g3eK-a2fQqP-a2g444-a2fKVM-a2ign3-dxtGhJ-dxofZr-dxtGzo-dxtGdQ-dxtFLh-dxtGnd-a2iZsQ-a2iBVE-9Y1EPD-a2fKmH-9Y1D4B-o5VJyp-a2fLX6-o43tas-9Y4wxq-9Y1RHH-9Y4Amq-9Y1Gpz-a2iAVG-a2fZba-9Y1QVc-9Y4BoQ-9Y4DXW-9Y1HAR-a2feFn-a2inqN-a2fjzR-a2fsAr-a2fqk4'>Flickr user PolandMFA</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>
The Kulangsu International Settlement. Image<a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tcitp_d823_kulangsu_settlement_and_amoy_in_the_background.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain)
Student Halls at the ADGB Trade Union School in Bernau . Image© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bernau_bei_Berlin_ADGB_Schule_Wohntrakte_vorne.jpg'>Wikimedia user Dabbelju</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
The historic centre of Vienna. Image© <a href='http://whc.unesco.org/en/documents/114397'>UNESCO author Francesco Bandarin</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO</a>
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IKEA’s SPACE10 Lab Reimagines Craftsmanship Through Digital Techniques

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Picking up on the debate surrounding digitization in fabrication and its impact on traditional crafts, Copenhagen-based SPACE10, the future-living laboratory created by IKEA, recently invited three architects—Yuan Chieh Yang, Benas Burdulis, and Emil Froege—to explore the potentials of CNC milling for traditional craft techniques. The architects came up with three divergent yet equally innovative solutions to address the fundamental issue that plagues digital production: an apparent lack of a "human touch." In a Post-Fordist world increasingly dominated by customization, this investigation holds obvious importance for a company which deals primarily in mass-produced ready-to-assemble products; however, with its advocation for the infusion of dying classical craft techniques into the digital manufacturing process, the experiment could be meaningful for many other reasons.
Jesse Works with 1 to 2 Scale Model Jesse Works with 1 to 2 Scale Model

The project aimed to find a way to create objects with a distinct aesthetic: ones that had the unique

Laminated Wood Joint Prototype
Benas Installs Panels
Direct Sunlight Hits Benas' Panels
 Reflected Light from the Copper Lamp During the Evening
1 to 2 Scale Model (Parts Collected)
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The Demolition of Delhi’s Hall of Nations Reveals India’s Broken Attitude to Architectural Heritage

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© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/33834913@N00/409859817'>Flickr CC user Panoramas</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/33834913@N00/409859817'>Flickr CC user Panoramas</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a> On the morning of April 24th, Delhi’s architecture community reacted in shock and disgust to the news that the city's Hall of Nations and the four Halls of Industries had been demolished. Bulldozers had worked through the previous night at the Pragati Maidan exhibition grounds in central Delhi, where the Indian Trade Promotion Organisation (ITPO) razed the iconic structures to the ground, ignoring pleas from several Indian and international institutions. The Hall of Nations, the world’s first and largest-span space-frame structure built in reinforced concrete, holds special significance in India’s post-colonial history—it was inaugurated in 1972 to commemorate twenty-five years of the young country’s independence. The demolition was met with widespread condemnation by architects and historians alike, not just because of the loss of an important piece of Delhi's
© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pragati_Maidan,_Hall_6.JPG'>Wikimedia user Kprateek88</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
The Purana Qila, less than 200 meters from the Hall of Nations site, is covered by the Heritage Conservation Committee due to its age.. Image© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/robphoto/2748901660'>Flickr user robphoto</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Image by <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pragathi_maidan_Delhi1.jpg'>Wikimedia user Rameshng</a> in public domain
© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pragatimaidanhall6.jpg'>Wikimedia user Raulcaesar</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
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