#ArchinectMeets @the_architecture_photographer

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/2e/2e2d3f5db5a8d8fc07e8cfc50d5421a1.png?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><a href="https://archinect.com/features/tag/1198457/archinectmeets" >#ArchinectMeets</a> is a series of interviews with members of the architecture community that use Instagram as a creative medium. With the series, we ask some of Instagram&rsquo;s architectural photographers, producers and curators about their relationship to the social media platform and how it has affected their practice.
Social media has undeniably affected the way we perceive, interpret and share opinions about architecture today. Using our own account, @Archinect, as a site for image curation and news content, we wanted to ask fellow Instagram users how they navigated the platform. We spoke to Paul Eis (@the_architecture_photographer), an architecture student and photographer based in Linz, Austria. His consistently colorful Instagram portfolio is a clever response to the monotonous social housing blocks in East Berlin; where they were uniformly grey, Eis made them multiply colorful. Where they were crumbling, ruinous and apparently indifferent to watching eyes, Eis meticulously transfo...

#ArchinectMeets @casualtimetravel

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/bb/bb12a81811521a01f4d4acbe50d3930f.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><a href="https://archinect.com/features/tag/1198457/archinectmeets" >#ArchinectMeets</a>&nbsp;is a series of interviews with members of the architecture community that use Instagram as a creative medium. With the series, we ask some of Instagram&rsquo;s architectural photographers, producers and curators about their relationship to the social media platform and how it has affected their practice.
Social media has undeniably affected the way we perceive, interpret and share opinions about architecture today. While we use our own account, @Archinect, as a site for image curation and news content, we wanted to ask fellow Instagram users how they navigated the platform. We spoke to Sinziana Velicescu, the photographer behind @casualtimetravel. Sun-bleached stucco and anonymous warehouses reveal the Los Angeles periphery as an undoubtable influence on Velicescu's photography, which perhaps lends it a unique presence on the image-based platform: though the fabled city is often represented in Hollywood blockbusters as a glittering Edenic backdrop, @casualtimetravel presen...

#ArchinectMeets @joaocarlostalves

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/50/50007cf246edb08a92bbdac24d45b113.png?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />#ArchinectMeets is a series of interviews with members of the architecture community that use Instagram as a creative medium. With the series, we ask some of Instagram&rsquo;s architectural photographers, producers and curators about their relationship to the social media platform and how it has affected their practice.&nbsp;
Social media has undeniably affected the way we perceive, interpret and share opinions about architecture today. Using our own account, @Archinect, as a site for image curation and news content, we wanted to ask fellow Instagram users how they navigated the platform as well as their thoughts on social media's impact on architecture. We spoke with Joāo Carlos Alves, the curator of @joaocarlostalves. An architect born in Portugal and currently living and working in Geneva, Switzerland, he produces imaginative architectural renderings specifically for Instagram in his spare time. Sharing his detailed imagery to the platform several times a month, Alves relishes Continue reading "#ArchinectMeets @joaocarlostalves"

#ArchinectMeets @collpol19

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/b5/b5f98ffec6933eeb8e5a0a3d864c326d.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />#ArchinectMeets is a series of interviews with members of the architecture community that use Instagram as a creative medium. With the series, we ask some of Instagram&rsquo;s architectural photographers, producers and curators about their relationship to the social media platform and how it has affected their practice.&nbsp;
Social media has undeniably affected the way we perceive, interpret and share opinions about architecture today. Using our own account, @Archinect, as a site for image curation and news content, we wanted to ask fellow Instagram users how they navigated the platform as well as their thoughts on social media's impact on architecture. We spoke with Collin Pollard (@collpol19), a photographer and image producer based in the San Francisco based area. Though Pollard has only been posting his work online for a year, its bold coloring and rugged yet minimal surfaces have quickly gained him a following.

#ArchinectMeets @__benthomas

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/77/778ce9f3f8438d061f02f9cfd85dcd56.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><a href="https://archinect.com/features/tag/1198457/archinectmeets" >#ArchinectMeets</a> is a series of interviews with members of the architecture community that use Instagram as a creative medium. With the series, we ask some of Instagram&rsquo;s architectural photographers, producers and curators about their relationship to the social media platform and how it has affected their practice.&nbsp;
Social media has undeniably affected the way we perceive, interpret and share opinions about architecture today. Using our own account, @Archinect, as a site for image curation and news content, we wanted to ask fellow Instagram users how they navigated the platform as well as their thoughts on social media's impact on architecture. We spoke with Ben Thomas (@__benthomas), a photographer and based in Australia. His career has taken him all over the world, including a trip to Dubai for the New Yorker. Through his work, he hopes to provide a way for people to consider the relationships that they Continue reading "#ArchinectMeets @__benthomas"

#ArchinectMeets @sssscavvvv

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/e2/e26550713430063975e28df10d2fc35c.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><a href="https://archinect.com/features/tag/1198457/archinectmeets" >#ArchinectMeets</a>&nbsp;is a series of interviews with members of the architecture community that use Instagram as a creative medium. With the series, we ask some of Instagram&rsquo;s architectural photographers, producers and curators about their relationship to the social media platform and how it has affected their practice.
Social media has undeniably affected the way we perceive, interpret and share opinions about architecture today. While we use our own account, @Archinect, as a site for image curation and news content, we wanted to ask fellow Instagram users how they navigated the platform. We spoke to Ryan Scavnicky, the meme extraordinaire behind @sssscavvvv. Marshall Mcluhan's maxim, "the medium is the message," is nowhere more tested than with his class-bending Instagram posts, where a cryptic essay on Object Oriented Ontology can be interrogated by a forcefully skewed image under Clip Art text.  Between his Instagram and his teaching fellowship at the School of Continue reading "#ArchinectMeets @sssscavvvv"

#ArchinectMeets @terriblefloorplans

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/91/912a894f32452f17197369e0ee06bff4.png?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />#ArchinectMeets is a series of interviews with members of the architecture community that use Instagram as a creative medium. With the series, we ask some of Instagram&rsquo;s architectural photographers, producers and curators about their relationship to the social media platform and how it has affected their practice.&nbsp;
Social media has undeniably affected the way we perceive, interpret and share opinions about architecture today. Using our own account, @Archinect, as a site for image curation and news content, we wanted to ask fellow Instagram users how they navigated the platform as well as their thoughts on social media's impact on architecture. We spoke with the curator of @terriblefloorplans, a careful collection of careless things, a repository of odd architectural content published daily on Instagram. With only 41 floor plans posted at the time of this writing, the anonymous curator has quickly gained a following among those users of Continue reading "#ArchinectMeets @terriblefloorplans"

A Victory Under The Sun Must Also Be Against It

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/d1/d1ee474b63fde45121703136a02c550b.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><p>Imitative solar panels - designed by companies including <a href="https://archinect.com/news/article/149993737/mit-startup-creates-camouflage-solar-panels" >Sistine Solar</a> and <a href="https://archinect.com/news/article/149975987/say-goodbye-to-clunky-solar-panels-and-hello-to-tesla-s-sleek-new-glass-solar-roof-tiles" >Tesla</a>&nbsp;- call into question the relationship between infrastructural aesthetics and the urgent need to conserve material resources in the current climate. Can conservation really only be sold in a dress? Is the conflation of the two our only way out of the environmental crisis?&nbsp;</p>          

#ArchinectMeets @lerichti

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/d2/d2585e41622912641d966a5026153510.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />#ArchinectMeets is a series of interviews with members of the architecture community that use Instagram as a creative medium. With the series, we ask some of Instagram&rsquo;s architectural photographers, producers and curators about their relationship to the social media platform and how it has affected their practice.
Social media has undeniably affected the way we perceive, interpret and share opinions about architecture today. Using our own account, @Archinect, as a site for image curation and news content, we wanted to ask fellow Instagram users how they navigated the platform.
We spoke to Philipp Heer (@lerichti), a freelancer photographer whose work primarily focuses on contemporary architecture in Switzerland and the neighboring European countries. His website states that his complete work can be found on Instagram, a profile he has kept active for nearly four years.

#ArchinectMeets @archiveofaffinities

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/0e/0ef9ea0490c420dc6dc33d099762b535.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />#ArchinectMeets is a series of interviews with members of the architecture community that use Instagram as a creative medium. With the series, we ask some of Instagram&rsquo;s architectural photographers, producers and curators about their relationship to the social media platform and how it has affected their practice.&nbsp;
Social media has undeniably affected the way we perceive, interpret and share opinions about architecture today. Using our own account, @Archinect, as a site for image curation and news content, we wanted to ask fellow Instagram users how they navigated the platform. We begin the series with Andrew Kovacs (@archiveofaffinities), a professor of architecture at UCLA and owner of the blog Archive of Affinities. Kovacs has treated this blog - divided between Instagram, Twitter and Tumblr - as his own personal strategy for "making architecture from architecture" against a field of notoriously uncompromising budgets, clients and deadlines. History often lays bare architecture t...

As Incoming Dean of the College of Architecture, Art and Planning of Cornell University, Meejin Yoon Shares Her Insights From Her Own Experience as an Architecture Student

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/2c/2cedad0d62c63aba27e2a1ffd05589a4.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><p>At the beginning of upcoming Spring semester, Meejin Yoon is the dean of the <a href="https://archinect.com/schools/cover/1544387/cornell-university" >College of Architecture, Art and Planning of Cornell University</a>. According to the Cornell Chronicle, Yoon is the first woman named to the position since the college was formed in 1896.</p>           

The Venice Biennale Swamp Pavilion, Part II: Futurity Island

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/f6/f6aa87fc19bdbc9a089c9f9dc448577d.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />Earlier this month, we featured the first week of events from the Venice Biennale's <a href="http://www.swamp.lt/" >Swamp School</a>: <a href="https://archinect.com/features/article/150076761/the-venice-biennale-swamp-pavilion-part-i-swamp-radio" >Swamp Radio</a>,&nbsp;a series of acoustic space explorations, radio experiments, environmental sound recordings and data sonification.&nbsp;
Futurity Island, the Swamp School's second week of events, was held from June 25th to the 30th. It provided its participants with a space and a series of field trips to speculate on urban and material futures and imagine radically new forms of interdisciplinary. Given the recent news of Miami's precarious fate as well as that of other coastal cities and islands, the discussions that took place seemed especially apt.  Given the urgency of collective response, the organizers of the Swamp School, Gediminas Urbonas and Nomeda Urbonas, intended to inspire a single question among its participants: "how can we co-live with the swamp?"

The Archinect Outpost Guide to the Los Angeles Arts District

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/0f/0f077689c160b9156da05971ec7c9e70.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />The Arts District holds special significance in Los Angeles. From its origins as a vineyard to a twice-dilapidated blight on the city, the Arts District is now the home of SCI-Arc, Hauser &amp; Wirth and the locally beloved Bread Lounge.&nbsp;
The Archinect Outpost - our retail initiative featuring a collection of small-run, independently published architecture and design publications - opened its polygal doors on June 15th with the intention of living up to the quality of its newfound neighbors in the Arts District. Now available at the Outpost is our free guide of the Arts District, featuring a walking guide for those unfamiliar with the area. Our selection is based on the customer feedback we received during Archinect Outpost's first two months of operation, most of whom had never been to Los Angeles, and fewer still had been to the Arts District. Check out some highlights from our recommended walking Continue reading "The Archinect Outpost Guide to the Los Angeles Arts District"

The Venice Biennale Swamp Pavilion, Part I: Swamp Radio

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/c9/c983c10f1157542aff5c69935b40e046.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />Though Venice has been the home of <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/871008/2018-venice-biennale" >the eponymous Biennale</a> since 1895 and the site of Western trade since roughly 400 AD, its longer history as a swamp is often overlooked. Its parcel of land and sea in Northeast Italy is notably hot, humid and rife with mosquitos, and has been since time immemorial.&nbsp;The ecosystems that depends on its swampy soil and vapor are threatened by human settlement, which has made it one of the most popular tourist destinations in modern history.
The Swamp Pavilion, Lithuania's contribution to the 2018 Venice Biennale, is a networked effort to highlight the intersection of human and natural history present in Venice in the middle of what is commonly referred to as the 'Anthropocene.' Organized by Gediminas Urbonas and Nomeda Urbonas, the Swamp School has developed new theories and pedagogies in the format of a 'school,' through public interventions, field trips, workshops, Continue reading "The Venice Biennale Swamp Pavilion, Part I: Swamp Radio"

The Brochures of the Venice Architecture Biennale

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/6f/6f06429a2774ba4345c45c81455a08ad.JPG?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />For 16 nonconsecutive years,&nbsp;architecture has had a starring role at the <a href="https://archinect.com/features/tag/763369/venice-architecture-biennale" >Venice Biennale</a>, located at the Southeast tip of Venice Italy. Countries from around the world represent their best architectural research and design; first within designated buildings on two campuses and second - if they strike a chord with visitors - throughout social media channels. What is often strewn across the internet are only the most daring designs and the most apparent research intentions:&nbsp;full-scale prototypes, immersive ephemera and provocative statements as big as the walls that contain them.
What the social media universe rarely gets to see from the Biennale, however, are the pamphlets that its visitors collect ravenously as they pass from pavilion to pavilion. These print documents reveal a significant amount of information relative to the individual pavilions (an significantly more than the photos of those pavilions themselves); some of them have short stories, a few are Continue reading "The Brochures of the Venice Architecture Biennale"

Is Instagram changing the way we design the world?

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/df/dfadc76987b22aa8f227133816992835.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>&ldquo;Designing from Instagram for Instagram seems like a snake eating its own tail. Everywhere looks like everywhere else and the eye grows tired of bananas or concrete tiles or mirror rooms.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>The built environment, this article from Bella Mackie&nbsp;suggests, is increasingly being designed as a 'backdrop;' a stage for those masses which might otherwise be disinterested in the fields of aesthetics and art production. This phenomenon can be felt when traveling the world just as apparently as in one's own backyard.&nbsp;
If the pressures of photogeneity are indeed shaping the built environment, how can depth and meditation be championed as a reflex? Or, alternatively, how might the architectural practice boldly go forth into a culture of the superficial?

From the Archinect Outpost: Offshore Studio’s Christoph Miler reveals the ideas behind Migrant Journal

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/98/98ebdd8335d49346bc8c10dfd5fcba56.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em><p>The first [journal] came out in 2016 and focused on the countryside and the movement of borders. The most recent, the fourth, titled Dark Matter, is about the invisible and illegal aspects of migration. One feature Christoph shows is a photo essay by Javier Corso, documenting the petrol smuggling trade between Nigeria and Benin.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Christoph Miller, a founder of <em><a href="https://migrantjournal.com/" rel="nofollow" >Migrant</a></em> &mdash; one of the journals we are proud to feature at the <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/1149443/archinect-outpost" rel="nofollow" >Archinect Outpost</a> &mdash; provides insights into the origins and intentions of his journal as it reflects the culture and politics of 21st century migration.&nbsp;</p>