Could the photos and videos taken by visitors to the Vessel really become its private property?


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/1c/1cad5df75239d487a34f77d189ec9aeb.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />The Hudson Yards development has been the subject of much recent criticism, but it is a notice in its Terms &amp; Conditions that has crossed the line for many of its visitors. Effective March 19th, one would find this warning article on the Vessel's website:

7. NOTICE OF FILMING OR RECORDING. I agree that all photographs, audio recordings, and video footage taken of me while at the Vessel, and any derivative works (“Recordings”), will be the sole property of Company. As the owner of the Recordings, Company has the unconditional, irrevocable right (exercisable by Company or by third parties on Company’s behalf) to reproduce, display and use the Recordings, including for advertising, marketing and promotional purposes, in all media and formats, whether now known or later developed. I further authorize Company to store the Recordings on a database and transfer the Recording to third parties in conjunction with security and Continue reading “Could the photos and videos taken by visitors to the Vessel really become its private property?”

As we celebrate its 130th birthday, we look at the copycats inspired by the Eiffel Tower


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/67/674d3fa545a9d268b52ffc61aa91d0d5.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>"Beyond its strictly Parisian statement, it touches the most general human image-repertoire: its simple, primary&nbsp;shape confers upon it the vocation of an infinite cipher ... [Gustave] Eiffel saw his Tower in the form of a serious&nbsp;object, rational, useful; men return it to him in the form of a great baroque dream which quite naturally touches&nbsp;on the borders of the irrational."</em>

– Roland Barthes, “The Eiffel Tower,” 1964

Who would have guessed that the Eiffel Tower, a widely despised structure at the time of its completion exactly 130 years ago, would not only become an icon, but the icon of icons? Did its image become so pervasive in the modern era because it is not a sacred monument, as Roland Barthes had observed, but rather a secular one? Is it because it signaled the escalation of the Industrial Revolution, both in its simplicity and its ingenuity of structural form?

Whatever Continue reading “As we celebrate its 130th birthday, we look at the copycats inspired by the Eiffel Tower”

The Technological Sublime of Non-Human Spaces: A Review of Liam Young’s "Machines Landscapes"


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/35/35b40717d6dddc4ecb48862b4ca681a7.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />A significant number of buildings around the world are deliberately uninhabitable by humans. They are, however, designed absolutely towards the service of human needs. The unusual conditions of these buildings, including those of telecommunications networks, automated agriculture and data centers are explored in&nbsp;<em><a href="https://outpost.archinect.com/store/machine-landscapes-architectures-of-the-post-anthropocene?category=Books" >Machine Landscapes: Architectures of the Post-Anthropocene</a></em>, a timely publication by Liam Young, the&nbsp;Australian-born architect operating in the spaces between design, fiction and futures, currently teaching at the <a href="https://archinect.com/sciarc" >Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc)</a>.

Liam Young and Geoff Manaugh will present their thoughts on the book at Architect Outpost March 23rd at 7pm, followed by a book signing. Machine Landscapes can be preordered from Archinect Outpost here.

You can RSVP here to reserve your spot at the event. 

Archinect Outpost to host artist Thomas Demand for book signing of The Complete Papers


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/4f/4ff5f4c150ee4f810c25ceb4fd67f87c.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />Join us at&nbsp;<a href="https://outpost.archinect.com/" rel="nofollow" >Archinect Outpost</a>&nbsp;on March 29th, from 7-9pm to host artist <a href="https://archinect.com/features/article/150118193/uncanny-perspectives-paper-realities-lectures-with-thomas-demand" rel="nofollow" >Thomas Demand</a> and <a href="https://outpost.archinect.com/store/the-complete-papers-thomas-demand?category=Books" rel="nofollow" >The Complete Papers</a>, the comprehensive survey of the artist's photographs to date.<em>&nbsp;</em>Published by&nbsp;MACK Books, The Complete Papers&nbsp;is an extensive volume encompassing all of Thomas Demand&rsquo;s work over the past 28 years, together with the most critical texts written about his practice.&nbsp;

Thomas Demand will be in attendance to sign books. Limited copies of the book will be available for purchase at the event, first come first serve, or you can reserve a copy from our online store, to pick up at the event or have shipped to you.

Thomas Demand, Space Simulator, 2003. Chromogenic Print On Diasec

The book includes previously unseen early works from 1990, together with reference reproductions on every one of his pieces. A newly commissioned interview with Russell Ferguson, new texts by Jeff Wall and Continue reading “Archinect Outpost to host artist Thomas Demand for book signing of The Complete Papers”

Michael Kimmelman on the travesty of Hudson Yards


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/37/3772570a41f8f9594398bfa3b9faff1f.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>"[Hudson Yards] is, at heart, a supersized suburban-style office park, with a shopping mall and a quasi-gated condo community targeted at the 0.1 percent.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Ahead of the opening of the long anticipated Hudson Yards complex in New York City, New York Times architecture critic Michael Kimmelman spared little time in sharing his disgust with its turn out.&nbsp;
Rendering of the Vessel, by Thomas Heatherwick

Kimmelman picks the complex apart building by building, including those by some of the biggest names in practice today such as Diller and Scofidio, Thomas Heatherwick and Norman Foster. Of Heatherwick’s Vessel, Kimmelman writes that it is “purportedly inspired by ancient Indian stepwells (it’s about as much like them as Skull Mountain at Six Flags Great Adventure is like Chichen Itza),” and that “the object — I hesitate to call this a sculpture — is a 150-foot-high, $200 million, latticed, waste-basket-shaped stairway to nowhere,

Continue reading “Michael Kimmelman on the travesty of Hudson Yards”

Geoff Manaugh joins Liam Young at Archinect Outpost to discuss the just-released book Machine Landscapes: Architectures of the Post-Anthropocene


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/c9/c9bed83718b105d0a40a96b6cc44144c.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />Join us at <a href="https://outpost.archinect.com/" rel="nofollow" >Archinect Outpost</a> on March 23th, from 7&ndash;9pm to host <a href="https://archinect.com/news/article/142284988/stories-from-the-anthropocene-archinect-sessions-one-to-one-4-with-liam-young" rel="nofollow" >Liam Young</a> and his newly edited book: <em>Machine Landscapes: Architectures of the Post-Anthropocene</em>.

Young and Geoff Manaugh will be in attendance to present their thoughts on the book, followed by a book signing. Machine Landscapes can be preordered from Archinect Outpost here.

You can RSVP here to reserve your spot at the event. 

From the publishers at Wiley Books: “Machine Landscapes surveys the architectural spaces in the world that are now entirely empty of people. The data centers, telecommunications networks, distribution warehouses, unmanned ports and industrialized agriculture that define the very nature of who we are today are at the same time places we can never visit. Instead they are occupied by server stacks and hard drives, logistics bots and mobile shelving units, autonomous cranes and container ships, robot vacuum cleaners and internet-connected toasters, driverless tractors

Continue reading “Geoff Manaugh joins Liam Young at Archinect Outpost to discuss the just-released book Machine Landscapes: Architectures of the Post-Anthropocene”

The Candid Musings of a Seasoned Observer: A review of Craig Hodgetts’ ‘Swimming to Suburbia’


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/bf/bfdcc50303cc750dc5fb488c44f06c5a.png?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />In his collected book of essays, <em>Swimming to Utopia</em>, <a href="https://archinect.com/news/article/123222752/fast-forward-look-back-archinect-sessions-episode-21-featuring-craig-hodgetts-of-ucla-s-hyperloop-studio-and-remembering-michael-graves-with-colleague-patrick-burke" >Craig Hodgetts</a>&nbsp;appears to be a proud writer, though his career never seems to have depended on it. Throughout the book one finds writing written purely for the thrill of it, and that is precisely why it is arguably more pleasurable than so much other architectural criticism.

Archinect Outpost is hosting Swimming to Suburbia on Saturday, March 16th, from 7-9pm. You can preorder a copy of his book here and RSVP to the event here. Craig will be speaking about the book, followed by a book signing.

Le Corbusier’s built works have been exhaustively documented by Richard Pare


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/19/19408cbed8c35b14f13d3c3d283bc204.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><a href="https://archinect.com/features/tag/384523/le-corbusier" rel="nofollow" >Le Corbusier</a> has been the subject of countless books, but this is a first: Richard Pare visited every known building designed by the Swiss architect over his 60 year career.&nbsp;

Le Corbusier, The Built Work. Photography by Richard Pare

Published by Monacelli Press, Le Corbusier: The Built Work is also a significant feat for Richard Pare, its principal photographer. Pare traveled the world, from Le Corbusier’s only built work in America to his only built work in Tokyo and everywhere in between, to document the architect’s oeuvre in a way never before seen. The texts provided by historian Jean-Louis Cohen add a depth to projects that other publications had deemed too insignificant to document, let alone analyze in detail. 

Villa Savoye, by Le Corbusier. Photo by Richard Pare

Le Corbusier: The Built Work is available for purchase at Archinect Outpost

What should we do with beautiful, fascist buildings?


This post is by Shane Reiner-Roth from Archinect


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/70/70f4ac8e1209560fb6a9794ecf4f2780.JPG?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>By championing virtues such as speed, technology, youth, and flight, the Futurists worked to cement Italy&rsquo;s status as highly advanced and, thus, superior. In Asmara, the handsome structures built between 1935 and 1941 became multi-faceted tools of oppression.

Eight decades later, these Italian-designed edifices are still standing, albeit in need of rehabilitation. But preserving Asmara’s Futurist architecture necessarily preserves the fascist agenda that erected them in the first place…

Though the Futurists are featured in virtually every textbook on Modernism, their politics can be described as more than controversial. As they embraced speed, technology and scientific progress, the Italian group was also upfront about its misogyny, sympathetic towards fascist ideologies and eager to shed lessons learned from the past. 

The Futurist Alfa Romeo building in Asmara, Eritrea

The Futurists built a significant number of buildings based on their principles in Asmara, a city in the African country Eritrea, that remain Continue reading “What should we do with beautiful, fascist buildings?”

Turns out, Walter Gropius was more warm and fuzzy than we remember him to be


This post is by Shane Reiner-Roth from Archinect


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/1f/1fcba3eee2f5f506ae987cf6e507df42.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />Though he was described by architectural historians as "humorless," Walter Gropius "was&nbsp;in fact a charismatic figure,"&nbsp;<a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/mar/01/rebel-with-a-cause-how-the-founder-of-bauhaus-changed-the-world" rel="nofollow" >according to The Guardian's&nbsp;Fiona MacCarthy</a>. His life and career are shrouded in myths of solemnity and passionlessness, though the fact remains that he imparted a significant and long-lasting passion towards founding the Bauhaus as well as his own career as an architect.&nbsp;

Drawings of the Bauhaus School in Dessau, by Walter Gropius

Gropius was poetic in his writing (as MacCarthy highlights a passage from his Bauhaus Manifesto: “Together let us desire, conceive, and create the new structure of the future, which will one day rise toward heaven from the hands of a million workers like the crystal symbol of a new faith”),  expressionist in his early work, and an advocate of healthy debate in his fabled school of art and design. And while Tom Wolfe famously criticized the architect as a Continue reading “Turns out, Walter Gropius was more warm and fuzzy than we remember him to be”

Meet Lydia Kallipoliti, Author of "The Architecture of Closed Worlds" and Special Guest at Archinect Outpost


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/fa/fabea12fd54620cde2cd2a6498b8b3dc.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />You may have seen <a href="https://archinect.com/features/article/150122834/37-fearless-moments-of-modern-history-a-review-of-the-architecture-of-closed-worlds" >our review</a> of Lydia Kallipoliti's book, The Architecture of Closed Worlds, or you may be planning to attend <a href="https://outpost.archinect.com/events/2019/3/6/archinect-outpost-presents-lydia-kallipolitis-the-architecture-of-closed-worlds-or-what-is-the-power-of-shit" >our event for the book tomorrow</a>&nbsp;featuring Kallipoliti and Lars M&uuml;ller, the publisher of her book,&nbsp;but you may not have known about her work and research that led to the landmark publication.&nbsp;

Buy the book | RSVP to the event

Meet Lydia Kallipoliti, Author of "The Architecture of Closed Worlds" and Special Guest at Archinect Outpost


This post is by Shane Reiner-Roth from Archinect


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/fa/fabea12fd54620cde2cd2a6498b8b3dc.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />You may have seen <a href="https://archinect.com/features/article/150122834/37-fearless-moments-of-modern-history-a-review-of-the-architecture-of-closed-worlds" >our review</a> of Lydia Kallipoliti's book, The Architecture of Closed Worlds, or you may be planning to attend <a href="https://outpost.archinect.com/events/2019/3/6/archinect-outpost-presents-lydia-kallipolitis-the-architecture-of-closed-worlds-or-what-is-the-power-of-shit" >our event for the book tomorrow</a>&nbsp;featuring Kallipoliti and Lars M&uuml;ller, the publisher of her book,&nbsp;but you may not have known about her work and research that led to the landmark publication.&nbsp;

Buy the book | RSVP to the event

Significant works of 2019 Pritzker Prize laureate Arata Isozaki


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/0b/0b68d5b16ac20e3800038908d26a6f3e.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><a href="https://archinect.com/features/tag/1279922/arata-isozaki" rel="nofollow" >Arata Isozaki</a> was just awarded the 2019 <a href="https://archinect.com/features/tag/697783/pritzker" rel="nofollow" >Pritzker Prize</a> at the age of 87. Isozaki once famously said that "the most important thing an artist can do is confront society with something it has never seen before, something in a sense improper."&nbsp;As a&nbsp;full life of work lies behind the Japanese architect, we can witness the shifts and patterns of his multi-decade career as it has been committed to the level of unfamiliarity and newness that Isozaki has long sought to imbue in his work.<br>

1. Ōita Prefectural Library, Ōita, Japan, 1962-66

Ōita Prefectural Library, photo courtesy of Yasuhiro Ishimot

As a young architect, Isozaki was influenced by the then-popular style of brutalist architecture, and he applied it when given the opportunity to design the library in his hometown of Ōita on the island of Kyushu. Far away from Tokyo, he did not consider himself a member of the Metabolist movement due

Continue reading “Significant works of 2019 Pritzker Prize laureate Arata Isozaki”

Archinect Outpost to host Swimming to Suburbia, Craig Hodgetts’ book of essays


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/eb/eb7d7cd4f3bebe9690abb0e5048383ef.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />Join us March 16th at Archinect Outpost to celebrate&nbsp;<em>Swimming to Suburbia</em>, the latest book of essays by UCLA professor <a href="https://archinect.com/hplusf" rel="nofollow" >Craig Hodgetts</a>. Hodgetts will be joined in a conversation by Todd Gannon, the editor of Swimming to Suburbia and Section Head of Architecture at the Ohio State University (OSU).&nbsp;

The book is available for presale here, to be signed by Craig Hodgetts and Todd Gannon at the event.

Craig Hodgetts and Lester Walker. Architectural Design 40 April 1970, 178

Widely known for his award-winning design work, the Los Angeles-based architect Craig Hodgetts has distinguished himself as one of the key voices of his generation through trenchant commentary and visionary speculation on architecture and design. This volume gathers an array of theoretical polemics on buildings and cities, critical assessments of major projects and personalities, and other writings that showcase Hodgetts’ unique position as both a central figure in the discipline Continue reading “Archinect Outpost to host Swimming to Suburbia, Craig Hodgetts’ book of essays”

Archinect Outpost to host Swimming to Suburbia, Craig Hodgetts’ book of essays


This post is by Shane Reiner-Roth from Archinect


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/eb/eb7d7cd4f3bebe9690abb0e5048383ef.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />Join us March 16th at Archinect Outpost to celebrate&nbsp;<em>Swimming to Suburbia</em>, the latest book of essays by UCLA professor <a href="https://archinect.com/hplusf" rel="nofollow" >Craig Hodgetts</a>. Hodgetts will be joined in a conversation by Todd Gannon, the editor of Swimming to Suburbia and Section Head of Architecture at the Ohio State University (OSU).&nbsp;

The book is available for presale here, to be signed by Craig Hodgetts and Todd Gannon at the event.

Craig Hodgetts and Lester Walker. Architectural Design 40 April 1970, 178

Widely known for his award-winning design work, the Los Angeles-based architect Craig Hodgetts has distinguished himself as one of the key voices of his generation through trenchant commentary and visionary speculation on architecture and design. This volume gathers an array of theoretical polemics on buildings and cities, critical assessments of major projects and personalities, and other writings that showcase Hodgetts’ unique position as both a central figure in the discipline Continue reading “Archinect Outpost to host Swimming to Suburbia, Craig Hodgetts’ book of essays”

Archinect Outpost to host Swimming to Suburbia, Craig Hodgetts’ book of essays


This post is by Shane Reiner-Roth from Archinect


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/eb/eb7d7cd4f3bebe9690abb0e5048383ef.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />Join us March 16th at Archinect Outpost to celebrate&nbsp;<em>Swimming to Suburbia</em>, the latest book of essays by UCLA professor <a href="https://archinect.com/hplusf" rel="nofollow" >Craig Hodgetts</a>. Hodgetts will be joined in a conversation by Todd Gannon, the editor of Swimming to Suburbia and Section Head of Architecture at the Ohio State University (OSU).&nbsp;

The book is available for presale here, to be signed by Craig Hodgetts and Todd Gannon at the event.

Craig Hodgetts and Lester Walker. Architectural Design 40 April 1970, 178

Widely known for his award-winning design work, the Los Angeles-based architect Craig Hodgetts has distinguished himself as one of the key voices of his generation through trenchant commentary and visionary speculation on architecture and design. This volume gathers an array of theoretical polemics on buildings and cities, critical assessments of major projects and personalities, and other writings that showcase Hodgetts’ unique position as both a central figure in the discipline Continue reading “Archinect Outpost to host Swimming to Suburbia, Craig Hodgetts’ book of essays”

Kevin Roche dies at age 96


This post is by Shane Reiner-Roth from Archinect


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/2d/2da61010258711ad45240fc37987d47e.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />Kevin Roche (1922-2019) had a lasting influence on the American architecture scene. After moving here from his native Ireland in 1948, Roche studied under Mies van Der Rohe, another significant European emigr&eacute;, and quickly found his footing in the country's largest cities, producing numerous designs for New York City, New Haven and Indianapolis.

In 2015, we spoke with Roche about his life-long career as an architect. As Amelia Taylor-Hochberg wrote at the time, “Roche is a hero of the long-game – during his sixty-five year career in the U.S. (and counting), he has trained or worked alongside seminal architectural vanguards Charles and Ray Eames, Mies van der Rohe and Eero Saarinen, and on projects for such heavyweight clients as the Federal Reserve, MIT, Ford, Deutsche Bank and IBM. Still practicing today at age 92, Roche is a force to be reckoned with, thanks to an unflagging work ethic and realist approach

Continue reading “Kevin Roche dies at age 96”

"Architecture for your body:" the Half-Timbered T-Shirt designed by Sam Jacob Studio


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/4c/4cfe21c98a4f2f0e8dd84fcf5a98d88a.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />When we were considering what to carry at <a href="https://outpost.archinect.com/" rel="nofollow" >Archinect Outpost</a>, our retail shop and event space in Downtown Los&nbsp;Angeles, the <a href="https://outpost.archinect.com/search?q=sam%20jacob&amp;f_collectionId=5b3ebd7cf950b7d5cd4bdee1" rel="nofollow" >products designed by Sam Jacob Studio</a> immediately sprang to mind. Though they were, without question, designed with architects with mind, they were designed to appeal to style-conscious consumers in general.&nbsp;

Medieval Half-Timbered Façade in England. Photographer Unknown.

One product in particular that borders the architecture/non-architecture line is the Half-Timbered T-Shirt. While its patterning and name indicate that its influence is the half timbered architecture common in Jacob’s native England. Popularized between 1450 and 1650, half-timber façades were originally designed to strengthen the structural skeleton of 2-3 story buildings most notably in England (though the method did find its way to parts of China and Japan). 

As half-timbering has been popularized in the modern era, its function as structural bracing has been eliminated, leaving only the aesthe…

What ever happened to pleasurable design? Looking back on Alessandro Mendini’s career


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/1b/1b4dee4509c64f30876051c138a7e6e9.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>Exuberant design was [Alessandro] Mendini&rsquo;s specialty. Mendini died last week, age 87, and his death leaves a void in the school of thought that favored emotion and surprise over the cold efficiency that has come to dominate much of design, calibrated as it is to the precise and bottomless needs of the technology industry.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Trained as an architect with a passion for design, <a href="http://bustler.net/news/4190/alessandro-mendini-receives-the-latest-european-prize-for-architecture" rel="nofollow" >Alessandro Mendini</a>&nbsp;(1931-2019) will be remembered as an advocate for the function of pleasure in design. Mendini and other Italian architects and designers championed a vibrant postmodernism throughout the second half of the 20th century, but Mendini's work was uniquely pervasive in the modern design world.&nbsp;
Anna, designed by Alessandro Medini

Medini’s Anna corkscrew (above) was one of the most popular items in the Alessi lineup when it was designed in 1994. Of the design, Fast Company’s Suzanne Labarre wrote that “as you stab the screw Continue reading “What ever happened to pleasurable design? Looking back on Alessandro Mendini’s career”

Jose Sanchez launched The Blindspot Initiative to a full house at Archinect Outpost


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            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/55/55f12b7d7e868ab1e24347933897c9f5.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />We would like to thank everyone that attended the launch of Jose Sanchez's book, The Blindspot Initiative. During the packed-house event Jose spoke about the intention of the book and was followed by&nbsp;<a href="https://archinect.com/behnazfarahi" rel="nofollow" >Behnaz Farahi</a>, Biayna Bogosian of <a href="https://archinect.com/somewheresomething" rel="nofollow" ><em>Somewhere Something</em></a> and <a href="https://archinect.com/sciarc/release/sci-arc-features-exhibition-by-m-casey-rehm-in-the-sci-arc-gallery" rel="nofollow" >Casey Rehm</a> of <em><a href="http://www.kinch-d.com/" rel="nofollow" >Kinch</a></em>.&nbsp;

Published by EvoloThe Blindspot Initiative contains a forward by generative software designer Casey Reas and texts by Jose Sanchez, David Gerber, Jenny Wu, Kate Davies and Mostafa Elsayed. 
Purchase The Blindspot Initiative at Archinect Outpost

Jose Sanchez presenting The Blindspot Initiative

The event was also unique in that it was the first virtual reality demonstration set up at Archinect Outpost. On the virtual reality device set up in the top space, Sanchez presented Block’hood, a city building simulator video game that focuses on ideas of ecology, interdependence and decay. The game invited players to envision a neighborhood, by building structures out of a catalog of 200+ blocks. 

Virtual Reality se…