Spotlight: Toyo Ito

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Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu As one of the leading architects of Japan's increasingly highly-regarded architecture culture, 2013 Pritzker Laureate Toyo Ito (born June 1, 1941) has defined his career by combining elements of minimalism with an embrace of technology, in a way that merges both traditional and contemporary elements of Japanese culture.
© Yoshiaki Tsutsui © Yoshiaki Tsutsui

Born in what is now Seoul when Korea was under Japanese rule, Ito's family moved to Japan itself when he was just two years old; he would eventually attend the University of Tokyo, where his prize-winning undergraduate thesis secured him a place in the office of Kiyonori Kikutake, a founder of Metabolism and one of the leading Japanese architects at the time.

Yatsushiro Municipal Museum. Image © Tomio Ohashi Yatsushiro Municipal Museum. Image © Tomio Ohashi
Sendai Mediatheque. Image © Nacasa & Partners Inc. Sendai Mediatheque. Image © Nacasa & Partners Inc.

Toyo Ito founded his

Tama Art University Library. Image © Iwan Baan
Taichung Metropolitan Opera House. Image © Lucas K. Doolan
Tower of Winds. Image © Tomio Ohashi
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ADEPT and KARRES + BRANDS Wins Contest to Design One of Germany’s Largest Masterplans

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© ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS © ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS

ADEPT and KARRES + BRANDS have won the international competition to design Oberbillwerder, a new masterplan district in the city of Hamburg. Offering around a million square meters of housing, business, shopping, public buildings, and recreational activities, the Oberbillwerder plan is the largest single development plan in Germany since Hafencity, which contains around 1.7 million square meters of new space (including the Hamburg Elbphilharmonie) and is also currently being completed in Hamburg.

© ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS © ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS

The proposal developed alongside Transsolar and titled in full "Oberbillwerder—The Connected City" places its focus on transport connectivity, especially for pedestrians, cyclists, and users of public transport. In the plan, a green artery runs throughout the street layout and will provide access to all the neighborhoods, public buildings, and recreational activities of the new masterplan, while the proposal also features rapid connections to central Hamburg.

© ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS © ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS

In tandem with these transport

© ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS
© ADEPT, KARRES+BRANDS
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2018 Venice Biennale Winners: Eduardo Souto do Moura, Switzerland, Great Britain, Jan der Vylde, Rahul Mehrotra, Andra Matin

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Courtesy of the Venice Biennale Courtesy of the Venice Biennale The curators of the 2018 Venice Biennale Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara of Grafton Architects have announced the winning contributions to the 16th International Architecture Exhibition. Selected with the help of jury members Frank Barkow, Sofia Von Ellrichshausen, Kate Goodwin, Patricia Patkau, and Pier Paolo Tamburelli, the winners of the Golden Lion for Best National Participation went to Switzerland. Meanwhile, in the Freespace exhibition curated by Farrell and McNamara at Venice's Arsenale, Eduardo Souto de Moura will take home the Golden Lion for Best Participant in the International Exhibition.

Best National Participation

Golden Lion: Switzerland

Svizzera 240 - House Tour. Image © Italo Rondinella Svizzera 240 - House Tour. Image © Italo Rondinella

The Golden Lion for the national pavilions was awarded to Switzerland, whose pavilion was praised for presenting "a compelling exhibition which was enjoyable while tackling the critical issues of scale in domestic space."

Honorable Mention: Great Britain

Great Britain Pavilion, "Island". Image © Italo Rondinella Great Britain Pavilion, "Island". Image
Eduardo Souto de Moura. Image © Francesco Galli
architecten de vylder vinck taillieu. Image © Italo Rondinella
RMA Architects. Image © Italo Rondinella
Andra Matin. Image © Francesco Galli
Courtesy of the Venice Biennale
Continue reading "2018 Venice Biennale Winners: Eduardo Souto do Moura, Switzerland, Great Britain, Jan der Vylde, Rahul Mehrotra, Andra Matin"

10 Chapels in a Venice Forest Comprise The Vatican’s First Ever Biennale Contribution

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Aerial view. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Aerial view. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu With the opening of the 16th Venice Architecture Biennale comes a look at the first ever contribution by the Holy See, an exhibition that brings together architects to design chapels that, after the Biennale, can be relocated to sites around the globe. Located in a wooded area on the Venetian island of San Giorgio Maggiore, 10 chapels by architects including Norman Foster, Eduardo Souto de Moura, and Smiljan Radic, are joined by the Asplund Chapel by MAP Architects. This 11th structure serves as a prelude to the other chapels, while reflecting on Gunnar Asplund's 1920 design for the Woodland Chapel. The Asplund Pavilion, like the Woodland Chapel that inspired it, is intended as a “place of orientation, encounter, meditation, and salutation.” The interior hosts an exhibition of drawings by Gunnar Asplund for the Woodland Chapel, accompanied by documents and models illustrating its concept and
Smiljan Radic. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Carla Juaçaba. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Javier Corvalán. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Sean Godsell. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Flores&Prats. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Eduardo Souto de Moura. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Francesco Cellini. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Norman Foster. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Andrew Berman. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Teronobu Fujimori. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
MAP Architects. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
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SOM to Design 2 Skyscrapers on Former Chicago Spire Site

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The site at 400 N Lake Shore Drive with the hole for the foundations of the Chicago Spire proposal. Image© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/orijinal/8329344372'>Flickre user orijinal</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> The site at 400 N Lake Shore Drive with the hole for the foundations of the Chicago Spire proposal. Image© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/orijinal/8329344372'>Flickre user orijinal</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Since construction was halted on the Chicago Spire, the Santiago Calatrava-designed skyscraper at 400 N Lake Shore Drive, the hole which was to become the tower's foundation has become something of a local punchline, variously being caricatured as the site of semi-ironic proposals for inner-city adventure playgrounds or the pit into which the city's other failed ventures can be metaphorically dumped. But according to a report by the Chicago Tribune, that narrative might be about to change, as their sources within the city government have confirmed that a proposal is in the works to bring two skyscrapers to the site, designed by David Childs of SOM, the lead architect behind 1 World Trade Center. Images of the proposal have
The original design for the Chicago Spire, which was scrapped in 2014. Image © Santiago Calatrava
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Designs by Adjaye Associates, BIG, DS+R Released for Adelaide Contemporary Museum

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© Adjaye Associates and BVN / Malcolm Reading Consultants © Adjaye Associates and BVN / Malcolm Reading Consultants Arts South Australia has unveiled 6 designs shortlisted in a competition for the Adelaide Contemporary, a new cultural destination in Australia's fifth-most populous city. The shortlist, which was announced in January, features a star-studded list of international practices, pairing some of Australia's most famous firms such as Woods Bagot, HASSELL, and Durbach Block Jaggers with international names such as Adjaye Associates, BIG, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, David Chipperfield Architects, and Ryue Nishizawa. The Adelaide Contemporary is planned to transform the site of the former Royal Adelaide Hospital (oRAH), and will feature exhibition, research, and education spaces situated in a public sculpture park and community meeting place. The museum will also notably host the Gallery of Time, a first-of-its-kind space to exhibit Aboriginal art alongside art from Europe and Asia, inviting visitors to see Australian art in a global context. The
© Adjaye Associates and BVN / Malcolm Reading Consultants
© BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group and JPE Design Studio / Malcolm Reading Consultants
© David Chipperfield Architects and SJB / Malcolm Reading Consultants
© Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Woods Bagot / Malcolm Reading Consultants
© HASSELL and SO-IL / Malcolm Reading Consultants
© Khai Liew, Office of Ryue Nishizawa and Durbach Block Jaggers / Malcolm Reading Consultants
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Spotlight: Rafael Moneo

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National Museum of Roman Art. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/pictfactory/2842858053'>Flickr user pictfactory</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> National Museum of Roman Art. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/pictfactory/2842858053'>Flickr user pictfactory</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> As the first ever Spanish architect to receive the Pritzker PrizeRafael Moneo (born 9 May 1937) is known for his highly contextual buildings which nonetheless remain committed to modernist stylings. His designs are regularly credited as achieving the elusive quality of "timelessness"; as critic Robert Campbell wrote in his essay about Moneo for the Pritzker Prize, "a Moneo building creates an awareness of time by remembering its antecedents. It then layers this memory against its mission in the contemporary world."
Image <a href='http://www.abc.es/20120509/cultura-arte/abci-rafael-moneo-201205091211.html'>via Diario ABC, S.L.</a>. Image <a href='http://www.abc.es/20120509/cultura-arte/abci-rafael-moneo-201205091211.html'>via Diario ABC, S.L.</a>.

When he was young, Moneo was more attracted to philosophy and painting than architecture, however it was the influence of his father - an industrial designer - that eventually led to him pursuing a career in architecture. He graduated

Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, Los Angeles. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/cwsteeds/5324514176/'>Flickr user cwsteeds</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
National Museum of Roman Art. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/pictfactory/2840558654'>Flickr user pictfactory</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
L’Auditori amb els Grans D’Europa. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/francesc_2000/4116798705/'>Flickr user Francesc_2000</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
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Spotlight: Herzog & de Meuron

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VitraHaus. Photography by Iwan Baan © Vitra VitraHaus. Photography by Iwan Baan © Vitra Led by Jacques Herzog (born 19 April 1950) and Pierre de Meuron (born 8 May 1950), most descriptions of Herzog & de Meuron projects are almost paradoxical: in one paragraph they will be praised for their dedication to tradition and vernacular forms, in the next for their thoroughly modern innovation. However, in the hands of Herzog & de Meuron this is no paradox, as the internationally renowned architectural duo combine tradition and innovation in such a way that the two elements actually enhance each other.
Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron Courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

Before establishing Herzog & de Meuron in 1978, both Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron studied architecture at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich) with Aldo Rossi and Dolf Schnebli. Early recognition came for projects such as the Blue House and the Stone House, but a particular

The Beijing National Stadium. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Beijing_national_stadium.jpg'>Wikimedia user Peter23</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
1111 Lincoln Road. Image © Nelson Garrido, Reprinted with permission from MBeach1, LLLP.
Perez Art Museum. Image Courtesy of Arcophotos
Elbphilharmonie Hamburg. Image © Iwan Baan
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Take a Deep Dive into Hong Kong’s Unique, Chaotic Urban History Through this Documentary Series

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© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hong_Kong_Island_Skyline_2009.jpg'>Wikimedia user WiNG</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hong_Kong_Island_Skyline_2009.jpg'>Wikimedia user WiNG</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Hong Kong is a unique city. With its unlikely history as a British Colony, its position as a global hub city, and its spectacular geography, the dense, lively streets of Hong Kong feature a variety of urban phenomena that can't be found anywhere else in the world. In this series of video essays, New Office Works probes the urban character of Hong Kong with stunning depth, uncovering histories and explanations that bring new intrigue to an urban fabric that is, both literally and figuratively, already heavily layered. The title of the series, Middle Man, references Hong Kong's status as a city that mediates between east and west, calling back to the "compradors" that helped the city to grow in the 19th century by translating for traders—middlemen in the most literal sense. Rooted in this
Continue reading "Take a Deep Dive into Hong Kong’s Unique, Chaotic Urban History Through this Documentary Series"

Spotlight: Peter Behrens

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The AEG Turbine Factory. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Berlin_AEG_Turbinenfabrik.jpg'>Wikimedia user Doris Antony</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> The AEG Turbine Factory. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Berlin_AEG_Turbinenfabrik.jpg'>Wikimedia user Doris Antony</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> If asked to name buildings by German architect and designer Peter Behrens (14 April 1868 – 27 February 1940), few people would be able to answer with anything other than his AEG Turbine Factory in Berlin. His style was not one that lends itself easily to canonization; indeed, even the Turbine Factory itself is difficult to appreciate without an understanding of its historical context. Despite this, Behrens' achievements are not to be underestimated, and his importance to the development of architecture might best be understood by looking at three young architects who worked in his studio around 1910: Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, and Walter Gropius.
Peter Behrens portrait taken by Waldemar Titzenthaler c.1913. (Public domain) Peter Behrens portrait taken by Waldemar Titzenthaler c.1913. (Public domain)

Born in Hamburg, Behrens moved to

The Peter Behrens House at the Darmstadt Artists' Colony. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/16782093@N03/4238259133'>Flickr user Metro Centric</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
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Self-Driving Uber Car Kills Pedestrian in Arizona

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© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Uber_self_driving_car.jpg'>Wikimedia user Diablanco</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Uber_self_driving_car.jpg'>Wikimedia user Diablanco</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Since the concept of driverless cars first became a serious prospect, a lot of attention has been given to the possibility of their malfunction—if an autonomous vehicle damages property or even harms a human, who is at fault? And, given a worst-case scenario, how should a vehicle's software choose between whose lives it prioritizes, the passenger or the pedestrian? This last question even became the basis for the Moral Machine, an online platform created by the MIT Media Lab that essentially crowdsources public opinion on different variations of the classic trolley problem thought experiment. However, all of these questions had been considered largely theoretical until last night when, as The New York Times reports, a woman was struck and killed by an autonomous vehicle in Tempe, Arizona. In what is believed to
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Spotlight: Louis Kahn

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Salk Institute. Image © Liao Yusheng Salk Institute. Image © Liao Yusheng Louis Kahn (February 20th 1901 – March 17th 1974) was one of the United States' greatest 20th century architects, known for combining Modernism with the weight and dignity of ancient monuments. Though he did not arrive at his distinctive style until his early 50s, and despite his death at the age of just 73, in a span of just two decades Kahn came to be considered by many as part of the pantheon of modernist architects which included Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe.
Louis Kahn Looking at His Tetrahedral Ceiling in the Yale University Art Gallery, 1953. Gelatin silver print. Image © Lionel Freedman. Yale University Art Gallery Archives Transfer Louis Kahn Looking at His Tetrahedral Ceiling in the Yale University Art Gallery, 1953. Gelatin silver print. Image © Lionel Freedman. Yale University Art Gallery Archives Transfer

Kahn was born Itze-Leib Schmuilowsky in Pärnu, in what is now Estonia. His family emigrated to Philadelphia when he was just a child, where Kahn would remain for the rest of his life, completing many of his

Exeter Library (Class of 1945 Library). Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ryan_d_cole/1812130328'>Flickr user ryan_d_cole</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>
Exeter Library (Class of 1945 Library) . Image via Wikimedia (Image from United States Library of Congress in public domain. Author Carol M Highsmith)
National Assembly Building of Bangladesh. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:National_Assembly_of_Bangladesh,_Jatiyo_Sangsad_Bhaban,_2008,_8.JPG'>Wikimedia Commons user Lykantrop</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Indian Institute of Management. Image © <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Louis_Kahn_Plaza.jpg'>Students of IIMA via Wikimedia</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY 3.0</a>
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Proposed Bridge in Sweden Will Turn a River Into a Public Amphitheater

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Courtesy of Erik Andersson Architects Courtesy of Erik Andersson Architects Kalix, a small town in Northern Sweden, has plans to replace its current bridge over the river in 2019. As part of the process, The Swedish Traffic Administration commissioned Erik Andersson Architects to design an initial study for a bridge that would not only replace the existing bridge's functions, but also add new elements to turn the new bridge into a gathering space and public amenity for the town.

The resulting design by Erik Andersson is a simple but ingenious solution which sees car and bicycle traffic occupying the bridge's top deck, while pedestrians are separated onto a path below, on the south side of the bridge. By dropping the pedestrian path, the road deck can act as a roof for the pedestrians in bad weather.

Courtesy of Erik Andersson Architects Courtesy of Erik Andersson Architects

However, the design's signature move is in the bridge's supporting arches, which extend like buttresses to slope down to the river.

Courtesy of Erik Andersson Architects
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Janet Echelman Suspends Time-Inspired Net Sculpture Over Madrid’s Plaza Mayor

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© João Ferrand © João Ferrand American artist Janet Echelman's latest sculpture is currently on display at Madrid's Plaza Mayor. Titled "1.78 Madrid," the piece is the latest of Echelman's suspended thread sculptures, and the newest piece in her Earth Time Series begun in 2010. On display until February 19th, the piece was unveiled on Friday to mark Madrid's 400th anniversary.
© João Ferrand © João Ferrand

Hanging above the plaza's statue of King Philip III of Spain, the piece explores the idea of time, and our interconnectedness with the physical systems which influence our relationship with time itself. The number 1.78 in the artwork's title refers to 1.78 microseconds, the amount of time that a day on Earth was shortened as a result of the 2011 Earthquake in Japan.

© João Ferrand © João Ferrand

“In the last four hundred years, people have gathered at Plaza Mayor to witness bull-fights and Spanish Inquisition burnings,” said Echelman. “Today we gather

© João Ferrand
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Snøhetta Designs Energy-Positive Lakeside Hotel in the Arctic Circle

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© Snøhetta/Plompmozes © Snøhetta/Plompmozes Snøhetta has unveiled its design for "Svart," a hotel for sustainable tourism company Arctic Adventure of Norway. Located within the Arctic Circle, on the edge of Norway's Holandsfjorden fjord at the base of the Svartisen glacier, the building is designed to the "Powerhouse" building standard, a system developed by Snøhetta and a group of collaborators for creating energy-positive sustainable buildings.
© Snøhetta/Plompmozes © Snøhetta/Plompmozes

Designed in a distinctive ring shape that allows visitors to feel in touch with the surroundings, the structure of the building was inspired by traditional Norwegian fishing structures: the “fiskehjell,” an A-shaped wooden structure for drying fish, and the “rorbue,” a type of seasonal house used by fishermen. These two references contributed to the building's supporting structure of poles that support the building above the water while making minimal contact with the ecosystem. These supports also enable a walkway around the ring of the hotel that visitors will be

© Snøhetta/Plompmozes
© Snøhetta/Plompmozes
© Snøhetta/Plompmozes
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BIG and Carlo Ratti Associati Reveal Design for One of Singapore’s Tallest Buildings

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© BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group & VMW © BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group & VMW

Bjarke Ingels Group and Carlo Ratti Associati have broken ground on 88 Market Street, a new skyscraper at the heart of Singapore's business district. Transforming a site which was previously occupied by a parking structure from the 1980s, the 280-meter-tall building will include plentiful greenery both on its facades and internally. Inside, the building will include offices, 299 serviced residential units, and ancillary retail space.

© BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group © BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group

The building's key design move is in the vertical fins rising the height of the tower, which are pulled open at certain locations to expose the tropical vegetation inside the building. At the ground floor, visitors to the building will be met with a public "rainforest plaza" and park, featuring a number of "activity pockets" which provide space for fitness sessions, art installations, or other community events. This park will flow into the "city room," a 19-meter-high entry space

© BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group
© BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group
© BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group
© BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group & VMW
© BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group
Continue reading "BIG and Carlo Ratti Associati Reveal Design for One of Singapore’s Tallest Buildings"

David Chipperfield Architects Selected to Design Tallest Tower in Hamburg

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Courtesy of David Chipperfield Architects Courtesy of David Chipperfield Architects

David Chipperfield Architects has won a competition to design the Elbtower, a 230-meter tall building in Hamburg that will be the city's tallest. Located on the eastern edge of the Hafencity, the sculptural building has a strong presence on the riverfront, forming a counterpoint to Herzog & de Meuron's Elbphilharmonie to the West. The building hosts office space in the tower, over a podium containing a bar, hotel, restaurant, retail and exhibition areas.

Courtesy of David Chipperfield Architects Courtesy of David Chipperfield Architects

The building comprises a podium which on one corner curves elegantly upward to form a glass tower. This tower tapers outward from its base, adding a powerful form to the Hamburg skyline. At its base, the building forms a number of connections to the city, linking to the train and underground station to the east and a bicycle-bridge over the canal to the north. At the meeting of these entrances, the

Courtesy of David Chipperfield Architects
Courtesy of David Chipperfield Architects
Courtesy of David Chipperfield Architects
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UNStudio Selected to Design New Cable Car in Gothenburg

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© Plompmozes © Plompmozes UNStudio has won a competition to design a new, 3-kilometer long cable car in the Swedish city of Gothenburg. The cable car's route, which will connect the old city on the south of the river with three locations to the north, will feature a total of six towers which have been designed around an adaptable, asymmetrical structural system intended to mimic the cranes in the city's shipyards. The expected opening date for the cable car is in 2021, with the new transportation system being inaugurated as part of the celebrations of Gothenburg's 400th anniversary.
© Plompmozes © Plompmozes

A cable car was proposed by the city as a way to significantly reduce travel times across the city with minimal impact upon the street level. The four stations, located at a bus and tram transfer node in Järntorget and at three other locations north of the river, feature faceted, floating roofs clad in wood provide a

© Plompmozes
Courtesy of UNStudio
Courtesy of UNStudio
Courtesy of UNStudio
© Plompmozes
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1 in 7 Women in Architecture Have Experienced Sexual Harassment in Past 12 Months, Reports AJ

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Courtesy of The Architects' Journal Courtesy of The Architects' Journal Around 1 in 7 women in UK architecture practices has experienced sexual harassment in the workplace in the past year alone, according to the results of the annual Women in Architecture survey conducted by The Architects' Journal. The poll of nearly 1,500 architects also found that more than half of women have experienced some form of discrimination ranging from bullying to workplace rules that leave them disadvantaged in the same period. The AJ's survey, which in previous years has largely focused on issues such as pay disparity between men and women, focuses this year more broadly on gender discrimination and sexual harassment—a response to the global shift in awareness organized around movements such as #MeToo and #TimesUp.
Courtesy of The Architects' Journal Courtesy of The Architects' Journal

Another question from the survey asked respondents whether they had witnessed sexual discrimination against another person in the past 12 months; once again, over

Courtesy of The Architects' Journal
Courtesy of The Architects' Journal
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Mexican Architect Frida Escobedo Selected to Design 2018 Serpentine Pavilion

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Interior render. Image © Frida Escobedo, Taller de Arquitectura, Renderings by Atmósfera Interior render. Image © Frida Escobedo, Taller de Arquitectura, Renderings by Atmósfera London's Serpentine Gallery has announced Mexican architect Frida Escobedo as the designer for the 2018 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in Hyde Park. Escobedo, known for her work in activating public spaces, will be the youngest architect to have participated in the Serpentine Pavilion program since it began in 2000. Her design features an enclosed courtyard created by two rectangular volumes positioned at an angle. With its interplay of light and water, the design is intended to evoke the sensation of Mexican domestic architecture, while using British materials and containing references to its London context.
Interior render. Image © Frida Escobedo, Taller de Arquitectura, Renderings by Atmósfera Interior render. Image © Frida Escobedo, Taller de Arquitectura, Renderings by Atmósfera

The pavilion will be constructed of cement roof tiles—chosen for their texture and dark color—stacked to form a celosia, a form of permeable wall common in Mexico. While the pavilion's courtyard will feature a triangular

Design drawing. Image © Frida Escobedo, Taller de Arquitectura
Continue reading "Mexican Architect Frida Escobedo Selected to Design 2018 Serpentine Pavilion"