Spotlight: Geoffrey Bawa

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A courtyard in Bawa's campus for the University of Ruhuna. Image © Harry Sowden A courtyard in Bawa's campus for the University of Ruhuna. Image © Harry Sowden Despite his late entry into architecture, Geoffrey Manning Bawa FRIBA, (July 23, 1919 – May 27, 2003), explored modernism and its cultural implications and created a unique, recognizable style of design which had a lasting impact on architects across the world. Well versed in Modernist theory, Bawa was one of the original proponents of Tropical Modernism, a design movement in which sensitivity for local context combines with the form-making principles of modernism. Bawa’s architecture led to the formation of a new architectural identity and aesthetic for many tropical environments, and won him recognition and awards, including the Chairman’s Award of the Aga Kahn Special Chairman’s Award for Architecture (2001) and the title Deshamanya, in recognition of his contributions to his country by the government of Sri Lanka.
Geoffrey Bawa; unknown photographer. Image Courtesy of The Geoffery Bawa Trust in Colombo, David Robson and Anjalendran C. Geoffrey Bawa; unknown photographer. Image Courtesy of The
The gardens at Lunuganga. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lunuganga,_Bentota,_Sri_Lanka..JPG'>Wkimedia user Labeet</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Lunuganga. Image © David Robson
Interior of Lunuganga. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lunuganga,_Bentota,_Sri_Lanka._Interieur_2.jpg'>Wkimedia user Labeet</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Ena de Silva House. Image ©  Helene Binet
Geoffrey Bawa's photograph of the courtyard at the Ena de Silva House. Image © Geoffrey Bawa
An Aerial View of the Bentota Beach Hotel. Image Courtesy of The Geoffery Bawa Trust in Colombo, David Robson and Anjalendran C.
The Bentota Beach Hotel. Image © Harry Sowden
The Sri Lanka Parliament Building. Image © Harry Sowden
Gardens at the Sri Lanka Parliament Building. Image © Harry Sowden
The University of Ruhuna. Image © Harry Sowden
Kandalama Hotel, Dambulla. Image © Harry Sowden
The Kandalama Hotel lounge. Image © David Robson
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Spotlight: Pier Luigi Nervi

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Palazzetto dello sport. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ihavegotthestyle/221174130'>Flickr user ihavegotthestyle</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Palazzetto dello sport. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ihavegotthestyle/221174130'>Flickr user ihavegotthestyle</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Known as both an architect and an engineer, Pier Luigi Nervi (June 21, 1891 – January 9, 1979) explored the limitations of reinforced concrete by creating a variety of inventive structural projects; in the process, he helped to show the material had a place in architecture movements of the coming years. Nervi began his career in a time of technological revolution, and through his ambition and ability to recognize opportunity in the midst of challenge, he was able to have an impact on several disciplines and cultures.
Image <a href='https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stadio_Artemio_Franchi#/media/File:PNervi1.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain) Image <a href='https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stadio_Artemio_Franchi#/media/File:PNervi1.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain)
Palazzetto dello sport. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/lulek/11420370036'>Flickr user lulek</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a> Palazzetto dello sport. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/lulek/11420370036'>Flickr user lulek</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a>

Nervi was born in Sondrino, Italy, and studied Civil Engineering at the University of Bologna

UNESCO Headquarters. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/french-disko/3712216223'>Flickr user french-disko</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a>
George Washington Bridge Bus Station . Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GWBridge-BusTerm.jpg'>Wikimedia user Seidenstud</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Torino Esposizioni. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/alobooom/15555030467'>Flickr user alobooom</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
Pirelli Tower. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ikkoskinen/4824881170/'>Flickr user ikkoskinen</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Stadio Artemio Franchi. Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stadio_Comunale_Giovanni_Berta.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain)
Continue reading "Spotlight: Pier Luigi Nervi"

Spotlight: Emilio Ambasz

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Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall (1995). Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/kentamabuchi/5920306109/'>Flickr user kentamabuchi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall (1995). Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/kentamabuchi/5920306109/'>Flickr user kentamabuchi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> As early as the 1970s, Emilio Ambasz (born 13 June 1943) initiated a discussion on sustainability through his work with green spaces and buildings which is arguably more important today than ever, and contributed to theoretical and design discourse outside of architecture through his wide variety of interest and career pursuits. Ambasz’s work has crossed several disciplines; he has been a curator, a professor, an industrial designer, and an architect, and is highly regarded in all of these varied pursuits.
Image <a href='https://www.azureazure.com/culture/emilio-ambasz-donates-new-museum-to-madrid'>via azureazure.com</a> Image <a href='https://www.azureazure.com/culture/emilio-ambasz-donates-new-museum-to-madrid'>via azureazure.com</a>

Born in Chaco, Argentina, Ambasz knew from an early age that he wanted to be an architect. According to a 2009 article in Architect Magazine, so great was his determination that at age 16 he worked for an architecture firm

Banca dell’Occhio (2008). Image Courtesy of Emilio Ambasz
Banca dell’Occhio (2008). Image Courtesy of Emilio Ambasz
Cordoba House (1975). Image © Michele Alassio
Lucile Halsell Conservatory at the San Antonio Botanical Garden (1988). Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/joevare/2995227809'>Flickr user joevare</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>
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Spotlight: Michael Graves

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Portland Building (1982). Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Portland_Building_1982.jpg'>Wikimedia user Steve Morgan</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Portland Building (1982). Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Portland_Building_1982.jpg'>Wikimedia user Steve Morgan</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> As a firm believer in the importance of making good design accessible to the public, Michael Graves (July 9, 1934 – March 12, 2015) produced an enormous body of work that included product design alongside his architecture. Graves brought Postmodernism to the public eye through his emphasis on ornament and aesthetics, and stood firmly behind his design philosophy even as it went out of vogue.
© Michael Graves & Associates © Michael Graves & Associates

Graves was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, where he spent most of his youth. He had a prestigious academic career; he received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Cincinatti, a Masters in Architecture from Harvard, and shortly after graduating, he won the Rome Prize, which enabled him to study at the American Academy in Rome

Denver Central Library (1990). Image © Michael Graves
Team Disney Building (1986). Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/lorenjavier/5677719265'>Flickr user lorenjavier</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>
via Pixabay user skeeze (public domain)
An Alessi kettle designed by Michael Graves. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dinnerseries/10139775603'>Flickr user dinnerseries</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
St. Coletta School (2006). Image © Michael Graves
Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort (1987). Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/lorenjavier/5029044710'>Flickr user lorenjavier</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>
Continue reading "Spotlight: Michael Graves"

Spotlight: Pier Luigi Nervi

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Palazzetto dello sport. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ihavegotthestyle/221174130'>Flickr user ihavegotthestyle</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Palazzetto dello sport. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ihavegotthestyle/221174130'>Flickr user ihavegotthestyle</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Known as both an architect and an engineer, Pier Luigi Nervi (June 21, 1891 – January 9, 1979) explored the limitations of reinforced concrete by creating a variety of inventive structural projects; in the process, he helped to show the material had a place in architecture movements of the coming years. Nervi began his career in a time of technological revolution, and through his ambition and ability to recognize opportunity in the midst of challenge, he was able to have an impact on several disciplines and cultures.
Image <a href='https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stadio_Artemio_Franchi#/media/File:PNervi1.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain) Image <a href='https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stadio_Artemio_Franchi#/media/File:PNervi1.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain)
Palazzetto dello sport. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/lulek/11420370036'>Flickr user lulek</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a> Palazzetto dello sport. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/lulek/11420370036'>Flickr user lulek</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a>

Nervi was born in Sondrino, Italy, and studied Civil Engineering at the University of Bologna

UNESCO Headquarters. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/french-disko/3712216223'>Flickr user french-disko</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a>
George Washington Bridge Bus Station . Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GWBridge-BusTerm.jpg'>Wikimedia user Seidenstud</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Torino Esposizioni. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/alobooom/15555030467'>Flickr user alobooom</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
Pirelli Tower. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/ikkoskinen/4824881170/'>Flickr user ikkoskinen</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Stadio Artemio Franchi. Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stadio_Comunale_Giovanni_Berta.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> (public domain)
Continue reading "Spotlight: Pier Luigi Nervi"

Ingrid Böck’s “Six Canonical Projects by Rem Koolhaas” Dissects the Ideas that have Made Koolhaas’ Career

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Seattle Central Library. Image © Ramon Prat
Seattle Central Library. Image © Ramon Prat
First published in May, Six Canonical Projects by Rem Koolhaas by Ingrid Böck reveals the logic behind Koolhaas’ projects and the ideas and themes running through his career. Incredibly thorough in her analysis, Böck aims to correct what she views as an absence of complete studies on an architect who has had an enormous influence on the theory and practice of architecture. Böck presents these six projects, which include Koolhaas’ thesis project “Exodus, or the Voluntary Prisoners of Architecture,” Ville Nouvelle Melun-Sénart, Maison Bordeaux, the Dutch Embassy in Berlin, the Seattle Central Library, and the CCTV Headquarters, because they most directly explore six concepts prominent throughout Koolhaas’ work: Wall, Void, Montage, Trajectory, Infrastructure, and Shape.

The monograph is subtitled Essays on the History of Ideas, which represents it almost as well as its formal title,

The introduction to Six Canonical Projects by Rem Koolhaas. Image Courtesy of Jovis Publishers
The Suitaloon. Image Courtesy of Jovis Publishers
The Perisphere. Image Courtesy of Jovis Publishers
Excerpt from 1. Wall: Exodus, or the Voluntary Prisoners of Architecture, London 1972. Image Courtesy of Jovis Publishers
Excerpt from 2. Void: Ville Nouvelle Melun-Sénart, Paris 1987. Image Courtesy of Jovis Publishers
Excerpt from 3. Montage: Maison à Bordeaux, France 1994-1998. Image Courtesy of Jovis Publishers
Excerpt from 4. Trajectory: Dutch Embassy, Berlin 1999-2003. Image Courtesy of Jovis Publishers
Excerpt from 5. Infrastructure: Public Library, Seattle 1999-2004. Image Courtesy of Jovis Publishers
Excerpt from 6. Shape: CCTV, Beijing 2002-2008. Image Courtesy of Jovis Publishers
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Gramazio Kohler’s Robotic Arm Creates an Elegant Twisting Brick Facade

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Advances in computers and fabrication technology have allowed architects to create fantastic designs with relative ease that in years past would likely require the labor of countless master craftsmen. Architecture firms like Gramazio Kohler Architects are known for their innovative approach to digital fabrication, adapting technology from a variety of fields. To create this stunning new brick façade for Keller AG Ziegeleien, Gramazio Kohler used an innovative robotic manufacturing process called “ROBmade,” which uses a robot to position and glue the bricks together. 

Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler

Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler
Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler
Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler
Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler
The robotic arm receives input from a 3D modeling program to carefully place thousands of bricks in a gracefully twisting pattern and automate most of the building process. The arm can carry out complicated functions with enormous precision, rotating bricks in multiple directions to create space between each brick, and to produce curvature and complicated shapes.

Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler
Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler

Gramazio Kohler uses

Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler
Courtesy of Gramazio Kohler
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See How Much New York Has Changed Since the 1990s

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© G.Alessandrini
Grégoire Alessandrini’s blog “New York City 1990’s” contains an enormous collection of images taken between 1991 and 1998 that artfully depict New York. The website is a snapshot of New York in the 1990s, capturing the spirit of the era with photographs of New York’s architecture that could only exist at that time. As politics and public sentiment have changed, the city has changed with it, and much of the New York Alessandrini captured no longer exists.  To document just how much New York has changed in the past 25 years, we have curated a selection of Alessandrini’s images and set each photograph next to a Google Street View window corresponding to the photographer’s location at the time. In the photographs where Alessandrini observes from an elevated vantage point, the Street View images are as close as possible to the photographer’s location.   Read
214 West 42nd Street. Image © G.Alessandrini
North East corner of 8th avenue and 42nd street. Image © G.Alessandrini
Times Square. Image © G.Alessandrini
73 Christopher Street. Image © G.Alessandrini
Bryant Park. Image © G.Alessandrini
24 Astor Place. Image © G.Alessandrini
12th Street, between 1st and A. Image © G.Alessandrini
W 23rd Street. Image © G.Alessandrini
Burger Klein building, at 28 Avenue A. Image © G.Alessandrini
The Jefferson Theater, at 214 East 14th Street. Image © G.Alessandrini
© G.Alessandrini
© G.Alessandrini
Walmir Meats, at 839 Washington Street. Image © G.Alessandrini
Empire Diner, at 210 10th Avenue. Image © G.Alessandrini
The Lost Diner, at 357 West Street. Image © G.Alessandrini
Sam Chinita Restaurant, at West 19th Street and 8th Avenue. Image © G.Alessandrini
Moondance Diner, at 80 6th Avenue. Image © G.Alessandrini
Selwyn Theater. Image © G.Alessandrini
Empire Theater, at 234 West 42nd Street. Image © G.Alessandrini
835 Washington St. Image © G.Alessandrini
The Vault, at 28 10th Avenue. Image © G.Alessandrini
Spike's Joint, at DeKalb Avenue and South Elliot Place in Brooklyn. Image © G.Alessandrini
Sunshine Hotel, at 241 Bowery. Image © G.Alessandrini
The Babydoll Lounge, at 34 White Street. Image © G.Alessandrini
Music Palace, at 91 Bowery. Image © G.Alessandrini
Sok's Grocery, at 98-100 Avenue A. Image © G.Alessandrini
The Variety Theater, at 110 3rd Avenue. Image © G.Alessandrini
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FAKT Office Creates a Floating Metal “Cloudscape” in Montpellier

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Photograph of the Cloudscape's Front Elevation. Image © Giulio Boem

FAKT Office, an up-and-coming studio based out of Berlin and Zurich, has created an architectural installation for the Festival des Architectures Vives, which uses perforated aluminum sheets to produce a cloudscape. Sponsored by metalworking companies Karl Dieringer and AMAG Austria Metall, the exhibition explores aluminum's material properties and its ability to create new forms.

Cloudscape Surface Contours. Image © Giulio Boem An Interior View of the Exhibition. Image © Giulio Boem Visitors Looking inside Cloudscape. Image © Giulio Boem Top of Cloudscape. Image © Giulio Boem

An Interior View of the Exhibition. Image © Giulio Boem
An Interior View of the Exhibition. Image © Giulio Boem
Visitors Looking inside Cloudscape. Image © Giulio Boem
Visitors Looking inside Cloudscape. Image © Giulio Boem

FAKT calls their exhibition "a progressive experiment both spatially and structurally," and uses artistic structural approaches to explore the design possibilities of cloudscapes and the abilities of aluminum. Cloudscape is made of two perforated aluminum sheets, each 2 millimeters thick, and covers an area of 6.4 m x 4.5 m. The project hangs from surrounding buildings by thin cables attached at its corners, and has a warped surface which contrasts

Top of Cloudscape. Image © Giulio Boem
Cloudscape Front Elevation
Cloudscape Plan
Cloudscape Surface Contours. Image © Giulio Boem
Interior of Cloudscape. Image © Giulio Boem
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NCARB’s 2015 Report Projects Positive Future for the Architecture Profession

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The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) has released “NCARB by the Numbers,” their annual report featuring statistics important to the architecture profession in the US. NCARB’s research portrays a positive future for the profession, with statistics showing that diversity is growing, architects are becoming licensed at an earlier age and progressing through licensure paths more quickly than in previous years, and more architects are becoming licensed than ever before. The 2015 report covers the causes and effects of the results, looking into the impact of location and education. A section entitled “Jurisdictions by the Numbers,” lays out standardized relevant information for viewers to investigate conditions in the architecture profession in each state. The report also includes an analysis of the role of NAAB-accredited programs in helping architects achieve licensure. Learn more on the information in NCARB’s report after the break. New architects are
COSMO, an ambitious project by Young Architect Program 16th edition winner Andrés Jaque. Image © Cosmo / Andrés Jaque/Office for Political Innovation
Studios in Cornell University's architecture school, a NAAB-accredited program, and ranked first in the country by DesignIntelligence for undergraduate architecture education. Image © Matthew Carbone
The Heydar Aliyev Center, designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, run by noted female architect Zaha Hadid. Image © Hufton + Crow
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Architecture Gear Giveaway: Win the new 32” Samsung UD970 Monitor

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The success of a design, from inception to construction, can depend on the extent to which designers can represent their intentions, but the days when architects used the drafting pencil and parallel edge to exercise physical control over their work are rapidly fading away. While computerization makes possible innovative forms and new methods of working, if not calibrated and engineered perfectly, digital technology can bring unintended consequences into the design process. Samsung’s UD970 monitor, however, resynchronizes the design process with the build environment through ultra-high definition (UHD) technology. Samsung partnered with leading designers, including Mark English Architects, to explore the importance of high-resolution detail in their work and ArchDaily has teamed up to bring these UHD monitors to our readers. To learn more, read on after the break.
The UD970’s features reflect the fact that it was created specifically with the needs of designers, architects and other visually-intensive
Continue reading "Architecture Gear Giveaway: Win the new 32” Samsung UD970 Monitor"

Spotlight: Emilio Ambasz

As early as the 1970s, Emilio Ambasz (born 13 June 1943) initiated a discussion on sustainability through his work with green spaces and buildings which is arguably more important today than ever, and contributed to theoretical and design discourse outside of architecture through his wide variety of interest and career pursuits. Ambasz’s work has crossed several disciplines; he has been a curator, a professor, an industrial designer, and an architect, and is highly regarded in all of these varied pursuits. Continue reading "Spotlight: Emilio Ambasz"

AECOM’s Basketball Training Facility Encases a Diverse Range of Program in LA

AECOM has designed a $42,000,000 campus and training facility for a professional basketball organization in West Los Angeles. With an estimated completion date of 2017, the building contains a basketball arena, corporate headquarters, a hall of fame, and gardens, among other programs. Despite the building’s varied uses, was determined to make it “basketball centric.”

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NCARB Discards “Intern” Title

The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), the governing body for much of the architectural profession in the US, is taking steps to take “intern” out of architectural vocabulary. In a press statement, NCARB president Dale McKinney, FAIA, NCARB, said that in the future, NCARB will only encourage regulatory language for post-licensure individuals

“Architects are those who have met all the requirements to become licensed in states and jurisdictions throughout the ,” McKinney said. “Everyone else is not an architect. But their status also doesn’t need a regulatory title such as ‘intern’ or any similar reference. This has become a term that has been perceived as negative by many in the architecture community and a term that really does not fully value the work that aspiring architects bring to the profession.”

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