“Brixel” Reinvents Basic Bricks for the Digital Age

          <div class="container-video">
    <iframe
      class="container-video__aspect-ratio"
      src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Z-5cVpWhp30?theme=light&showinfo=0&color=white"
      frameborder="0"
      allowfullscreen>
    </iframe>
  </div>

Many contemporary design innovations have embraced the growth and expansion of new technologies. BREAKFAST, a Brooklyn-based rapid product and prototype company, has released ‘Brixel’ a product that combines the customizability technology can provide with the most fundamental building block of architecture - the brick.

The Brixel is an infinitely rotating brick controlled by a software app on your phone. The sleek design and variety of available shapes provide the designer or architect with the tools needed to create a 3-dimensional, interactive installation. Brixel’s design flexibility allows it to be used in many applications, such as dynamic wall installations, railings, facades, and sculpture. Andrew Zolty, BREAKFAST's Co-Founder and Head of Design described Brixel:

Courtesy of BREAKFAST Courtesy of BREAKFAST

“We saw an opportunity to blur the lines between what is deemed ‘art,’ ‘infrastructure,’ and a ‘digital display,’ We sought to develop a new medium that would allow us to create a variety of captivating

Courtesy of BREAKFAST
Courtesy of BREAKFAST
Continue reading "“Brixel” Reinvents Basic Bricks for the Digital Age"

CUBO’s Entrance Pavilion Seamlessly Integrates Aarhus City’s Old Town Into The Modern City

    <figure>
Courtesy of CUBO Courtesy of CUBO

CUBO, a local architecture firm from Aarhus City, Denmark, has designed the main entrance pavilion for the firm's native city which will connect two existing elements of Aarhus - the Botanical Gardens and the Old Town. The building is both inviting and welcoming to residents and visitors, alike, providing the city with a gathering space, meeting point, and information hub.

Both the Botanical Gardens and Old Town are major attractions for visitors, playing an integral role in the city’s international reputation. CUBO’s pavilion seeks to enhance and add to what already exists by sensitively integrating the structure in the existing landscape.

Courtesy of CUBO Courtesy of CUBO

Early 20th-century architect and furniture designer, Anton Rosen, designed an existing circular pavilion that stands prominently on the site. The new building will not deter from the historic importance and visual impact of Rosen’s building, but rather, provide additional space for

Courtesy of CUBO
Courtesy of CUBO
Continue reading "CUBO’s Entrance Pavilion Seamlessly Integrates Aarhus City’s Old Town Into The Modern City"

Architecture Film Festival Rotterdam Explores “Building Happiness” in Historic and Contemporary Design

    <figure>

In recent years, architecture film festivals have erupted around the globe providing critics, theorists, and all architectural thinkers with an additional median for architectural expression and discussion. The symbiotic relationship between architecture and film stems from architecture’s effect on its built environment and its determined social/cultural impact.

As the international audience grows and new genres emerge, architecture film festivals have come to encompass more than just the film’s initial viewing; programs, lectures, and discussions are organized, enhancing the intellectual impact of the viewing material. Architecture Film Festival Rotterdam (AFFR) is celebrating its tenth edition this October by exploring the concept of “building happiness” in an age when we seek to build a more sustainable world - a challenge for both historic and contemporary design.

1. Mole Man

From the creator: “Mole Man tells the touching story of Ron Heist, a 66-year-old man with Autism, who has been working on an

Continue reading "Architecture Film Festival Rotterdam Explores “Building Happiness” in Historic and Contemporary Design"

This Moss-Covered, Octagonal Micro-Cabin Combines Luxury and Rustic Aesthetic

    <figure>
© Madeline Lu © Madeline Lu

Jacob Witzling may lack formal architectural training, but his passion for nature and cabin architecture has provided him with all the tools needed to both design and construct idyllic living spaces. Witzling’s cabins can be found throughout the United States; these structures are often sequestered to the woods, providing a remote escape from urban centers and suburban sprawl.

Witzling’s interest in cabins began at the age of 16. His father, an architect and engineer, provided him with a preliminary exposure to the world of designing and building. “I needed to exist in the woods, and even though I had never built anything other than a blanket fort, I knew that my passion to create would be sufficient,” says Witzling. “I remember pouring over the pages of my dad’s favorite book, 'Handmade Houses: A Guide to the Woodbutcher’s Art.' I would gaze at the pictures from inside

© Chris Poplawski
via Zillow
© Allen Meyer
© settle.in.the.forest
Continue reading "This Moss-Covered, Octagonal Micro-Cabin Combines Luxury and Rustic Aesthetic"

Andres Gallardo’s Study of Urban Geometries in Paris Captures the Complexities of Form, Shadow, and Angle

    <figure>
© Andres Gallardo © Andres Gallardo

Andres Gallardo, the self-taught Spanish photographer, recently traveled to Paris to capture the city’s urban architecture, documenting the spirit of the buildings, the city’s rich architectural history, and international design influence.

Gallardo describes the city as “magical,” which he chooses to document in both monochrome and color photographs, incorporating overall perspectives and small structural details that often obscure the structures’ overall identity.

© Andres Gallardo © Andres Gallardo

The overall series, titled "Urban Geometry,” includes photographs from cities in both Europe and Asia. This compilation of images follows the artist’s personal journey, placing emphasis on the versatility of architectural forms and the complexity of each city’s unique urban fabric.

© Andres Gallardo © Andres Gallardo

Through the photographer’s lens, light animates the city’s architecture. The Pompidou Center, once described by many upon its completion as an “architectural horror,” has become an iconic example of architectural expression and innovation. Gallardo’s

© Andres Gallardo
© Andres Gallardo
© Andres Gallardo
Continue reading "Andres Gallardo’s Study of Urban Geometries in Paris Captures the Complexities of Form, Shadow, and Angle"

Architectural Intervention: Transforming Venice’s Historic Structures to Fit Contemporary Needs

    <figure>
via OMA via OMA The history of Venice’s architecture, as seen today, is a semblance of styles centuries old. A destination rich in culture, many of Venice’s existing buildings, from homes alongside the thin interior canals to the grand domed churches of Palladio, have remained stagnant in their overall design and layout since the 16th century. Once a hub of Byzantine and European trade, the city now thrives on a steady stream of tourism and a foundational group of local residents. The structures that make up the city’s compact matrix, once integral to its function as a commercial empire, have come to take on new functions through architectural intervention; notably, architects such as Carlo Scarpa, OMA, and Tadao Ando have had a large hand in this process.
via OMA via OMA
The Fondaco dei Tedeschi at the foot of the Rialto has served many functions since its initial construction in 1228.
© Luca Girardini
© Bruno Vanbesien
© Alessandro Spadavecchia
via OMA
Continue reading "Architectural Intervention: Transforming Venice’s Historic Structures to Fit Contemporary Needs"

Kengo Kuma Creates Starbucks Store in Taiwan From 29 Shipping Containers

    <figure>
Courtesy of Starbucks Courtesy of Starbucks

Hot on the heels of its lavish breakthrough Milan store, Starbucks has opened yet another striking and innovatively-designed coffee house. However, Japanese architect Kengo Kuma's design associates an entirely different mood with the company's coffee beverages.

Starbucks Taiwan the company’s first location in the Asia Pacific, consists of 29 white shipping containers, shifted and stacked in a grid-like formation. Within the containers’ 3,444 sqft (320 sqm) of space are a variety of intimate and comfortable spaces. A drive-thru is also incorporated into the design to maximize the store’s convenience to its customers.

Courtesy of Starbucks Courtesy of Starbucks

Kengo Kuma’s vision follows a current trend in Starbucks’ store designs as the company has opened over 40 coffee locations in structures that utilize a shipping container as a fundamental building block.

Courtesy of Starbucks Courtesy of Starbucks

At a glance, the container structure looks impenetrable, but Kuma’s design utilizes a series

Courtesy of Starbucks
Courtesy of Starbucks
Continue reading "Kengo Kuma Creates Starbucks Store in Taiwan From 29 Shipping Containers"

Fentress Designs Norwegian Chancery in Washington D.C. as a Homage to National History

    <figure>
Courtesy of Fentress Architects Courtesy of Fentress Architects

Fentress Architects has revealed their design for the expansion of the Norwegian Chancery in Washington D.C. A prominent new addition to the embassy’s Washington D.C. campus. The scheme expands the architectural language of the existing embassy buildings, embracing contemporary design techniques within the context of traditional bureaucratic architecture.

Fentress’ design integrates materials of Norwegian cultural significance as prominent features of the façade. The use of Norwegian spruce timber, Oppdal stone, and patinated copper pay homage to the country’s traditions in shipbuilding and woodworking, as well as their abundance of natural resources.

Courtesy of Fentress Architects Courtesy of Fentress Architects

The 30,000 square-foot addition was designed to ignite an intriguing dialogue between the new and the old. Most importantly, the contrast between Fentress’ vision and the existing neo-classical buildings was meant to create a harmonious dichotomy.

While providing significant functional, accessibility, and sustainability upgrades, our architecture will make

Courtesy of Fentress Architects
Courtesy of Fentress Architects
Continue reading "Fentress Designs Norwegian Chancery in Washington D.C. as a Homage to National History"

Fentress Designs Norwegian Chancery in Washington D.C. as a Homage to National History

    <figure>
Courtesy of Fentress Architects Courtesy of Fentress Architects

Fentress Architects has revealed their design for the expansion of the Norwegian Chancery in Washington D.C. A prominent new addition to the embassy’s Washington D.C. campus. The scheme expands the architectural language of the existing embassy buildings, embracing contemporary design techniques within the context of traditional bureaucratic architecture.

Fentress’ design integrates materials of Norwegian cultural significance as prominent features of the façade. The use of Norwegian spruce timber, Oppdal stone, and patinated copper pay homage to the country’s traditions in shipbuilding and woodworking, as well as their abundance of natural resources.

Courtesy of Fentress Architects Courtesy of Fentress Architects

The 30,000 square-foot addition was designed to ignite an intriguing dialogue between the new and the old. Most importantly, the contrast between Fentress’ vision and the existing neo-classical buildings was meant to create a harmonious dichotomy.

While providing significant functional, accessibility, and sustainability upgrades, our architecture will make

Courtesy of Fentress Architects
Courtesy of Fentress Architects
Continue reading "Fentress Designs Norwegian Chancery in Washington D.C. as a Homage to National History"

Winner of ‘Home: What is the Future?’ Competition Announced

    <figure>
Overall Winner: "HAPPI: Integrated Apparatus" by Massimilian Orzi, Studio Orzi. Image Courtesy of arch out loud Overall Winner: "HAPPI: Integrated Apparatus" by Massimilian Orzi, Studio Orzi. Image Courtesy of arch out loud

Architectural research initiative ‘arch out loud’ has announced the winners of the HOME competition. Entrants were asked to answer the question: ‘What is the future of HOME?’ A winner was identified for each category: Overall, Innovation, Adaptability, and Pragmatism.

As changes in global circumstances give rise to new design and living trends, the traditional definition of the home as a private place of permanence and stability has altered to accommodate these transitions. The competitors were asked to consider these changes, such as the impact of population shifts, the unpredictability of our changing ecosystem, contemporary forms of community housing and community relations, and newly engineered materials.

Overall Winner

HAPPI: Integrated Apparatus / Massimilian Orzi, Studio Orzi

Overall Winner: "HAPPI: Integrated Apparatus" by Massimilian Orzi, Studio Orzi. Image Courtesy of arch out loud Overall Winner: "HAPPI: Integrated Apparatus" by Massimilian Orzi, Studio Orzi. Image Courtesy of arch out loud

Innovation Award: "Above the Tire" by  Dazhong Yi, University of Pennsylvania. Image Courtesy of arch out loud
Adaptability Award: "The Not-For-Long Home" by Stav Dror and Liran Messer, Bezalel Academy of Arts & Design. Image Courtesy of arch out loud
Pragmatic Award: "Urbanism of Stuff" by Jacob Comerci, Princeton University School of Architecture . Image Courtesy of arch out loud
Continue reading "Winner of ‘Home: What is the Future?’ Competition Announced"

The Øm Museum Juxtaposes Archaeological Ruins With A Modern Interpretation of Medieval Monastic Architecture

    <figure>
Courtesy of Galmstrup Courtesy of Galmstrup

Denmark’s natural landscape along the shoreline of Mossø lake was once home to a vibrant monastic community. All that remains are ruins and unearthed artifacts - the reminisce of an active, self-sustaining monastic compound.

Galmstrup, a London-based architecture firm that specializes in community and cultural projects, has designed a gallery building to house the excavated archaeological objects and remains on site – maintaining the strong connection between the ruins and the growing collection of artifacts.

Courtesy of Galmstrup Courtesy of Galmstrup

Each object found on the site has the potential to unlock new information about the life of the medieval monk at Øm. The circulation of the museum’s interior was designed with the intention of telling the story of monastic daily life and enhancing the connection between spirituality and the surrounding natural landscape.

Courtesy of Galmstrup Courtesy of Galmstrup

The geometries of the new museum structure were inspired by elements of medieval church

Courtesy of Galmstrup
Continue reading "The Øm Museum Juxtaposes Archaeological Ruins With A Modern Interpretation of Medieval Monastic Architecture"

The Modernist Skopje Map, A Pocket Guide to Brutalist Architecture in Macedonia’s Capital

    <figure>
Courtesy of Blue Crow Media Courtesy of Blue Crow Media

Skopje, the capital city of the Republic of Macedonia, is home to many of the best international examples of Brutalist architecture. Once a part of the former Yugoslavia, the city features the work of architectural visionaries such as Kenzo Tange, Janko Konstantinov, and Marko Mušič. The “Modernist Skopje Map” is Blue Crow Media’s most recent map in a series of publications covering architectural history in former Yugoslavia.

© Vase Amanito © Vase Amanito

An essential, yet disturbing, reason for Skopje’s concentration of Brutalist and Modernist architecture is the 1965 earthquake that destroyed sixty-five percent of the city. In an effort to redevelop the area, Japanese architect Kenzo Tange was asked to lead a team of Japanese and Yugoslavian architects and conceptualize a modern city plan for Skopje.

Courtesy of Blue Crow Media Courtesy of Blue Crow Media

With Tange at the helm, many Brutalist architects were drawn

© Vase Amanito
© Vase Amanito
Continue reading "The Modernist Skopje Map, A Pocket Guide to Brutalist Architecture in Macedonia’s Capital"

Office Ou Designs First Urban Public School in Central Prague in Nearly 100 Years

    <figure>
Courtesy of Office Ou Courtesy of Office Ou

Office Ou, a Toronto-based landscape design firm, in collaboration with INOSTUDIO Architects, has designed a new public school for the historic Smíchov district of Prague. The initial competition, organized by the Centre for Central European Architecture, chose the Office Ou & INOSTUDIO design out of 66 anonymous submissions. This school would be the first new public school built in Prague's urban center in close to 100 years.

Courtesy of Office Ou Courtesy of Office Ou

The school building will accommodate about 540 students and be a focal point in the city’s efforts to transform a former railway yard into a mixed-use community space. This area of new development emphasizes the importance of green space and pedestrian circulation. The school’s architecture, a grid of balconies and outdoor garden areas, effortlessly combines the internal classroom experience with Prague’s growing urban fabric.

Courtesy of Office Ou Courtesy of Office Ou

Office Ou has emphasized flexibility

Courtesy of Office Ou
Courtesy of Office Ou
Continue reading "Office Ou Designs First Urban Public School in Central Prague in Nearly 100 Years"

Studio NAB’s ‘Hololightkeeper’ Resurrects Holographic Technology to Reinvent the Lighthouse

    <figure>

‘Hololightkeeper,’ a conceptual model that is distinct in its use of holographic technologies, pays homage to an architectural structure that has quickly been transformed into a historic relic. The lighthouse, once a navigational aid to guide sailors towards land and warn traveling ships of dangerous conditions, has been replaced in its function by modern technologies. In this respect, Studio NAB’s ‘Hololightkeeper’ attempts to resurrect a building typology by dematerializing the lighthouse structure-type, while maintaining its historic symbolism.

Studio NAB has re-appropriated the use of the lighthouse classification. The envisioned structure consists of a 30 square-meter cabin, encased in stainless steel panels, that sits atop a metal framework and reinforced concrete. The stabilizing pillar intersects with a bridge, connecting the inhabitable structure to land. A retractable ladder extends from the base of the elevated cabin to the bridge below.

The compact interior envelope houses both living and working spaces. The

Continue reading "Studio NAB’s ‘Hololightkeeper’ Resurrects Holographic Technology to Reinvent the Lighthouse"

Building Trust International Names Winner of the 2018 Affordable Housing Design Challenge

    <figure>

Building Trust International has announced the winner of the organization’s 2018 Affordable Housing Design Challenge. Over 3,000 architects, designers, and engineers entered the competition and 400 design proposals were submitted. Each design sought to provide sustainable, safe, and secure affordable housing schemes that specifically target the needs of low income workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

A jury composed of representatives from Building Trust International, The United Nations Development Program, and the Phnom Penh Special Economic Zone selected ‘at Architecture’ as the challenge winner. Citing the feasibility of the architectural design and the scheme’s careful consideration of Cambodia’s natural environment, the jury saw the design as an optimal solution to a complex, local problem. With over 17,000 factory workers in the region, there are few options for high quality affordable homes. This forces many of these workers and their families to settle for short term rentals with less than adequate conditions

Continue reading "Building Trust International Names Winner of the 2018 Affordable Housing Design Challenge"