Choreographed Performance at Farnsworth House Explores “Queer Space” in the Work of Mies van der Rohe

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© Bradley Glanzrock, LStopMedia.com. Courtesy of Gerard & Kelly © Bradley Glanzrock, LStopMedia.com. Courtesy of Gerard & Kelly

This article was originally published on the blog of the Chicago Architecture Biennial, the largest platform for contemporary architecture in North America. The 2017 Biennial, entitled Make New History, will be free and open to the public between September 16, 2017 and January 6, 2018.

“Writing about music is like dancing about architecture.” This famously misattributed analogy has floated through the arts world for decades as shorthand for the difficulty of imposing the gestures of one creative discipline onto another. But why should dance and architecture get lost in translation? Isn’t there an inherent poetry to the movement of bodies navigating the built environment?

© Bradley Glanzrock, LStopMedia.com. Courtesy of Gerard & Kelly © Bradley Glanzrock, LStopMedia.com. Courtesy of Gerard & Kelly

Creative links between architecture and dance stretch back at least as far as the Bauhaus, the pioneering German design school where performances like

© Bradley Glanzrock, LStopMedia.com. Courtesy of Gerard & Kelly
© Bradley Glanzrock, LStopMedia.com. Courtesy of Gerard & Kelly
© Bradley Glanzrock, LStopMedia.com. Courtesy of Gerard & Kelly
© Bradley Glanzrock, LStopMedia.com. Courtesy of Gerard & Kelly
© Bradley Glanzrock, LStopMedia.com. Courtesy of Gerard & Kelly
© Bradley Glanzrock, LStopMedia.com. Courtesy of Gerard & Kelly
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Frank Gehry, Architectural Education, and the “Future of Prisons”

Last week the Architect’s Newspaper reported that Frank Gehry, the 88-year old superstar of American architecture, is teaching a course at SCI-Arc this spring entitled “The Future of Prison.” To denizens of architecture Twitter, which has specialized in outrage over the past several months, the news seemed like a bad April Fool’s joke. Even the course description had the tone-deaf optimism of a Silicon Valley pitch line, asking “emerging architects to break free of current conventions and re-imagine what we now refer to as ‘prison’ for a new era.”