In Jerusalem, a Matchmaker Pairs Mature Artisans with Young Designers

                                <em>We visited Jerusalem Design Week where Daniel Nahmias exhibited &#8220;Matchmaker,&#8221; a collection to promote traditional craftsmanship in Jerusalem by coming up with new collaborations between older artisans and young designers.</em>
                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/jerusalem-matchmaker-scouts-for-artisans-young-designers/or-kaplan-6305_preview/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/07/or-kaplan-6305_preview-810x540.jpeg" alt="In Jerusalem, a Matchmaker Pairs Mature Artisans with Young Designers" /></a>
                                “I love walking around this place. There’s all sorts of people with crazy talent. You never know who you will meet,” Daniel Nahmias says as we follow him through the Old City of Jerusalem in the midday heat. It is our first day in Israel, and even though some of us have begun to tire with the weather, Nahmias has a sprightly spirit that makes us pick up our pace. It’s the same spirit we will later come to associate with his work. He leads us with childlike excitement through the alleyways and stone streets, through one turn and then another, through quarters unexplored by even the Jerusalemites themselves.

Photo by Or Kaplan

Photo by Or Kaplan

We turn a corner filled with
Continue reading "In Jerusalem, a Matchmaker Pairs Mature Artisans with Young Designers"

Highlights from Design Tokyo 2018: Be a Scent DJ and More

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/highlights-design-tokyo-2018/modoo_fr-005/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/07/modoo_fr.005-810x456.jpg" alt="Highlights from Design Tokyo 2018: Be a Scent DJ and More" /></a>
                                <a href="http://www.designtokyo.jp/en/"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Design Tokyo</a> has become the one-stop destination for Japanese designers and vendors, and its profile has strengthened over the years ever since Tokyo Design Week was phased out in 2016. Over 90,000 people attended the 3-day event in Tokyo Big Sight last week. Here are the highlights from Design Tokyo:
Moodo is a smart home fragrant diffuser produced by the Israeli company Agan Aroma. Agan Aroma has been concocting scents for 35 years (many of which are likely used in perfumes you owned!) and they’ve created an IoT home system so you can control the scent of your home.

Courtesy of Moodo.

Moodo works with Alexa and Google Assistant. You can create a unique ambiance instantly by using a smartphone app or voice control. The app also comes with preset families of scents that you can purchase. Shuffle through the scent families so that you’ll be introduced to a
Continue reading "Highlights from Design Tokyo 2018: Be a Scent DJ and More"

Stitched in the desert: Iota’s Products Are Made by Bedouin Women in the Negev

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/stitched-desert-iotas-products-made-bedouin-women-negev/or-kaplan-6235/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/06/or-kaplan-6235-810x540.jpg" alt="Stitched in the desert: Iota’s Products Are Made by Bedouin Women in the Negev" /></a>
                                A home interiors and accessories company is providing jobs for Bedouin women who aren’t allowed to hold employment outside of their home. Tal Zur, CEO of <a href="https://iotaproject.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Iota Hand Stitched</a>, speaks to Design Milk about why they think “soft furniture” is the next home design frontier, how they found themselves in the Negev, and where their designs are going this summer!

Tal Zur, CEO of Iota Studio. Photo by Or Kaplan.

Design Milk’s Keshia Badalge at Iota Hand Stitched in Tel Aviv, Israel.

“If you want a product that is straight, where all the sides are equal, the color is all the same, then that’s not us. Our products are alive,” Zur tells us as we sit in her studio in Tel Aviv. And sure enough, her studio emulates that same liveliness, with hanging swings, chunky-knit rugs and pillows and shelves full of colorful yarn, specifically put together by a
Continue reading "Stitched in the desert: Iota’s Products Are Made by Bedouin Women in the Negev"

Rem Koolhaas and Son Tomas Talk About The Years-Long Process of Shooting “REM”

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Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas

ArchDaily had the chance to catch Rem Koolhaas and his son, Tomas Koolhaas, together, when they met for a weekend in Los Angeles. In their first ever interview together, following the release of “REM” online, we spoke with the pair about the documentary that was four years in the making. The film had Tomas following his father from the desert to the ocean to the 2014 Venice Biennale, as well as inside several OMA projects around the world, like the Seattle Central Library in America and Maison à Bordeaux in France.

The pair reveal what their father-son relationship is like, how the profession of architecture and filmmaking inform each other, and shine a light on the challenges of filming a well-known family member. Work aside, what came across the most strongly throughout the conversation was the respect they had for each other’s craft, and their
Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas
Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas
Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas
Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas
Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas
Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas
Continue reading "Rem Koolhaas and Son Tomas Talk About The Years-Long Process of Shooting “REM”"

At Romanian Design Week: An Intimate Creative Economy

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/romanian-design-week-intimate-creative-economy/fashion-exhibition-romanian-2/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/05/Fashion-exhibition-Romanian-1-810x540.png" alt="At Romanian Design Week: An Intimate Creative Economy" /></a>
                                This month, The Institute in Romania presented its 6th edition of <a href="http://www.institute.ro/romanian-design-week" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Romanian Design Week</a> in the capital of Bucharest. Romania may not be a staple destination in the European design circuit; a communist country until the 1989 Romanian Revolution, it is more known for associations with Dracula, stuffed cabbage leaves and traditional peasant huts in the countryside. Now, Romania’s design aesthetic is in a state of free, thoughtful reinvention. This year’s presentation showed a strong contingent of young designers, many of whom have returned from working abroad, and are bent on merging traditional Romanian style with their international influences.
Romanian Design Week attracts 30,000 visitors each year, and to their credit, they have done this with no government backing. Instead, the festival is put together by The Institute, an organization providing an “ecosystem for creative industries in Romania.” Maria Neneciu, a program manager at The Institute, says the design
Continue reading "At Romanian Design Week: An Intimate Creative Economy"

What Makes a City Livable to You?

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© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/132839384@N08/17241901246'>Flickr user Hafitz Maulana</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. ImageA music festival in Singapore © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/132839384@N08/17241901246'>Flickr user Hafitz Maulana</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. ImageA music festival in Singapore

Mercer released their annual list of the Most Livable Cities in the World last month. The list ranks 231 cities based on factors such as crime rates, sanitation, education and health standards, with Vienna at #1 and Baghdad at #231. There’s always some furor over the results, as there ought to be when a city we love does not make the top 20, or when we see a city rank highly but remember that one time we visited and couldn’t wait to leave.

To be clear, Mercer is a global HR consultancy, and their rankings are meant to serve the multinational corporations that are their clients. The list helps with relocation packages and remuneration for their employees. But a company’s first choice on where to send their workers is

The streets of Santiago, Chile. Image © Maria Gonzalez Reginato
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/design_aditi/15988588224/'>Flickr user design_aditi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>. ImageA street festival in Singapore
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/66944824@N05/11249849026/in/photolist-i97qbf-in4tDU-ouUUS8-ouUUNv-o468VL-22u3o-77zBQK-okzUWk-4cAvW8-jHx8Qd-3r86YN-apw4LF-boYsYa-cj8Qm5-in4oCJ-BF73uy-6C9B7f-o46oq5-fzv2rS-6uPEp7-oky56U-vG5hx-ppsZVB-XhvETP-cqV7Kb-7RVnL9-a9ENQe-fzfQSD-6f6CA7-o47kpc-pbvVQ-8Yd5V4-fzfHHn-cAKU1y-hkX2of-hEBytM-6wECzG-6CmjxH-edYxPD-6cYNCG-umAAh-fzfHng-fzfSTt-6yvsZE-YoA4wh-cuEbk-6C4hDJ-7DKHWK-2MeYUH-7xXSoW'>Flickr user Denis Bocquet</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>. ImageA void deck in Singapore with food and community spaces
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/alessandrocapotondi/4005051491/in/photolist-76UWgV-3KxvAU-axpJG3-p3w1ZV-dqXUxr-332JeD-Up7GQ2-7sZSD9-anHhcu-egDRSz-9uNyFp-73qEgr-9Hi1f-Tj8YqE-4edThh-a823nT-C8VAq-br4AXA-7hXpLB-7YDTcv-a84UJW-8KaAPw-C8VxB-TmZAwg-4RkJqt-3pxtCA-6NZh7w-Tj9DBA-9uRtV7-NnyY5-3roqLV-7JAE7L-a84UDU-enqTJQ-3pxBCw-8PRnY-9uNxG4-5AhcxR-j1Dte-8P7TaB-UmoQQC-TjaHa5-7YDSW4-7YDTAP-73tB3q-73uxXh-3pLYiy-3pxuvb-VyJQk-73q5hV'>Flickr user Alessandro Capotondi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. ImageSpanish Steps in Rome
The streets of São Paulo, Brazil. Image © Victor Delaqua
An elderly man at Ópera, one of the busiest intersections in Paris. Image © Keshia Badalge
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/luca_volpi/7349601514/in/album-72157630076290206/'>Flickr user Luca Volip</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>. ImageCasa Verdi in Milan
V&A Museum along Exhibition Road. Image © Keshia Badalge
Streets and flags. Image © Victor Delaqua
Celebrating the Euro Cup on Champ de Mars, Paris. Image © Keshia Badalge
A music performance in the Paris metro station. Image © Keshia Badalge
Continue reading "What Makes a City Livable to You?"

A New Roof by Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos Turned This Ancient German Castle Into an Enlarged Exhibition Space

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© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu The Moritzburg castle in the city of Halle is exemplary of the Gothic military architecture in 15th century Germany. Despite the partial destruction of the north and west wings during the Thirty Years War, the site has managed to retain most of its original features: a surrounding wall, three of the four round towers at the corners, and a central courtyard.

But more importantly, the castle has been home to an art museum since 1904. The challenge arose when this exhibition space needed to be expanded, without modifying or adding onto the original columns. With some genius and creativity, Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos created a new exhibition space based on a single, clear architectural idea: a new roof. 

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Moritzburg castle was already host to a notable collection of modern art, mostly German Expressionism paintings, for over a century. So when the museum received a large donation

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Continue reading "A New Roof by Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos Turned This Ancient German Castle Into an Enlarged Exhibition Space"

Gjøde & Partnere Arkitekter’s Sculpture By The Sea Transforms Cottesloe Beach Into Floating Desert Island

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© Ross Duggan © Ross Duggan On The Desert Island in Cottesloe Beach, Australia, a 72-meter wall of mirrors partitions out a section of the sand, creating a cove of its own. The wall faces the Indian Ocean, and the curved reflection of sand merging with the soft-blue waters and the horizon beyond creates an illusion of an enclosed space; a desert island floating in an endless sea. Conceived of by the Danish architecture studio Gjøde & Partnere Arkitekter, the installation was brought to life in Australia during the annual Sculpture By The Sea exhibition last month. It is the largest free public sculpture exhibition in the world, and anyone can submit their ideas. As beachgoers stumbled upon this panorama of the shore upon sand, they danced, took photos, and watched the sunset from the wavering reflections of the mythical island.
© David Dare Parker © David Dare Parker
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It is a sublime installation, where isolation

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Continue reading "Gjøde & Partnere Arkitekter’s Sculpture By The Sea Transforms Cottesloe Beach Into Floating Desert Island"

Laurian Ghinitoiu Captures Dreamlike Nature of Junya Ishigami’s Work at Fondation Cartier in Paris

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© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu From March 30 to June 10, 2018, the Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain will host Junya Ishigami's exhibition, Freeing Architecture. This is the first major solo exhibition that the Fondation Cartier in Paris has devoted to an architect, and fitting that it would lend itself to an important and singular figure of Japan's young architecture scene. Ishigami - winner of the Golden Lion award at the Venice Biennale in 2010 - has instilled this conceptual body of work with his trademark flair: calm, free fluidity, with bright tones and playful curves. The projects in the exhibition range from large scale models to films and drawings, and when placed in the context of the exhibition, they bring to life Jean Nouvel's iconic building as well. Laurian Ghinitoiu gives us a glimpse inside the exhibition ahead of the opening day tomorrow. His photos reveal the lightness and ethereal quality
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Continue reading "Laurian Ghinitoiu Captures Dreamlike Nature of Junya Ishigami’s Work at Fondation Cartier in Paris"

BIG’s Shenzhen International Energy Mansion Captured by Laurian Ghinitoiu

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© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu The Shenzhen International Energy Mansion is the main headquarters of the Shenzhen Energy Company in China. In designing the building, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) paid special attention to one feature: the building's facade. The firm knew that in such a tropical climate, using a traditional curtain wall glass envelope would overheat the buildings and make people crank up their air conditioners. What BIG came up with in their winning design, and what is now the building's most defining feature, is a folded, origami-like facade. This facade provides high insulation and diffuses incoming sunlight, while reflecting the strongest rays onto solar panels.

Laurian Ghinitoiu points his lens towards this uncommon facade design and places the skyscraper within the lively metropolitan context of Shenzhen, China. 

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Continue reading "BIG’s Shenzhen International Energy Mansion Captured by Laurian Ghinitoiu"

Why Does The Gender Pay Gap Issue Make People Uncomfortable?

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Foster + Partners' London office, Riverside. Image © Marc Goodwin Foster + Partners' London office, Riverside. Image © Marc Goodwin

Last week, ArchDaily covered a story about the gender pay gap at Foster + Partners. We thought such a story was "unsurprising" given that the gender pay gap is something that is widely reported on, and present in almost every industry, and we wanted to share a case of it happening in an architectural firm many of us are familiar with. What we did not expect was that readers would think it is a non-issue, or that such reporting was sensational. Is it possible for us to talk about gender in the workplace without being up in arms? Why does the gender pay gap issue make people uncomfortable? 

Some of our editors discussed how gender plays into their workplace experiences as well as some hopeful recent signs that we are on a path to change.

Joanna Wong: I think it’s important to first outline

Continue reading "Why Does The Gender Pay Gap Issue Make People Uncomfortable?"

David Chipperfield’s Amorepacific Headquarters in Seoul Photographed by Laurian Ghinitiou

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© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu Amorepacific, Korea's largest beauty company, occupies a site in the centre of Seoul, Korea. Their headquarters was designed by David Chipperfield Architects as a single clear volume, with large urban openings and a central void. In the middle of a bustling downtown landscape, the building strikes a bright, open figure.

The Amorepacific HQ took three years to complete and opened in 2017. The firm described the building as "abstract and gestural," with hanging gardens that provide dramatic views over the city and the mountains in the distance. The design echoes aspirations of mediating between local and global, private and public, collective and individual, formal and informal. Laurian Ghinitiou captures the identity of this dynamic headquarters.

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David Chipperfield’s Amorepacific Headquarters in Seoul Photographed by Laurian Ghinitiou

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© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu Amorepacific, Korea's largest beauty company, occupies a site in the centre of Seoul, Korea. Their headquarters was designed by David Chipperfield Architects as a single clear volume, with large urban openings and a central void. In the middle of a bustling downtown landscape, the building strikes a bright, open figure.

The Amorepacific HQ took three years to complete and opened in 2017. The firm described the building as "abstract and gestural," with hanging gardens that provide dramatic views over the city and the mountains in the distance. The design echoes aspirations of mediating between local and global, private and public, collective and individual, formal and informal. Laurian Ghinitiou captures the identity of this dynamic headquarters.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
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  <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/ArchDaily/~4/k93E9NHuOY4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

David Chipperfield’s Amorepacific Headquarters in Seoul Photographed by Laurian Ghinitiou

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© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu Amorepacific, Korea's largest beauty company, occupies a site in the centre of Seoul, Korea. Their headquarters was designed by David Chipperfield Architects as a single clear volume, with large urban openings and a central void. In the middle of a bustling downtown landscape, the building strikes a bright, open figure.

The Amorepacific HQ took three years to complete and opened in 2017. The firm described the building as "abstract and gestural," with hanging gardens that provide dramatic views over the city and the mountains in the distance. The design echoes aspirations of mediating between local and global, private and public, collective and individual, formal and informal. Laurian Ghinitiou captures the identity of this dynamic headquarters.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
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  <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/ArchDaily/~4/k93E9NHuOY4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

David Chipperfield’s Amorepacific Headquarters in Seoul Photographed by Laurian Ghinitiou

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© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu Amorepacific, Korea's largest beauty company, occupies a site in the centre of Seoul, Korea. Their headquarters was designed by David Chipperfield Architects as a single clear volume, with large urban openings and a central void. In the middle of a bustling downtown landscape, the building strikes a bright, open figure.

The Amorepacific HQ took three years to complete and opened in 2017. The firm described the building as "abstract and gestural," with hanging gardens that provide dramatic views over the city and the mountains in the distance. The design echoes aspirations of mediating between local and global, private and public, collective and individual, formal and informal. Laurian Ghinitiou captures the identity of this dynamic headquarters.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
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Is the Pritzker Prize Still Relevant Today?

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Rural House designed by RCR Arquitectes. Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, and Ramón Vilalta of RCR Arquitectes won the Pritzker last year. Image Courtesy of RCR Arquitectes Rural House designed by RCR Arquitectes. Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, and Ramón Vilalta of RCR Arquitectes won the Pritzker last year. Image Courtesy of RCR Arquitectes

The Nobel Prize in Architecture.” “The profession’s highest honor.” These are some of the terms used to describe the Pritzker Prize. One day before the 2018 Pritzker Prize winner is to be revealed, ArchDaily’s editors discuss whether the prize still lives up to its hype.

The Pritzker Prize was founded in 1979 by Jay A. Pritzker and his wife Cindy. It is awarded every year "to honor a living architect or architects whose built work demonstrates a combination of those qualities of talent, vision and commitment, which has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the built environment through the art of architecture."

The Pritzker has been awarded 39 times to date, and the winners come from all over.

Continue reading "Is the Pritzker Prize Still Relevant Today?"

Laurian Ghinitoiu Captures Visitors’ Delight at Asif Khan and Hyundai’s Interactive Olympic Pavilion

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Earlier this month, the Winter Olympics was officially opened in South Korea. Laurian Ghinitiou visited PyeongChang to capture the celebrations and the festivities of the Winter Olympic Games. At the Olympic Park, he turned his lens towards the now-famous Vantablack VBx2 building designed by Hyundai and Asif Khan. The pavilion was conceived of as a "narrative" and everything from the facade to the five rooms within -- water, solar, electrolysis, hydrogen fuel stack and recreation of water -- were part of the story. 

The unique experience starts from the initial encounter of the pitch-black building at the Olympic Park to the final room where water droplets ripple off the walls. The alluring black facade, for example, embodies the dearth of light in space, as well as the infinite possibilities of the universe. The universe is also the birth place of Hydrogen during the Big Bang and is

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Continue reading "Laurian Ghinitoiu Captures Visitors’ Delight at Asif Khan and Hyundai’s Interactive Olympic Pavilion"

What Is Architecture Without Clients And Money? ArchDaily Editors Talk

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Would BIG and Thomas Heatherwick have designed a huge, adaptable tensile structure for any client other than Google?. Image © Google Would BIG and Thomas Heatherwick have designed a huge, adaptable tensile structure for any client other than Google?. Image © Google In January, we covered an interview with Bjarke Ingels where he spoke of the role that clients play in architecture. In the article, Bjarlke Ingels mentioned that "In the world of architecture there are many more things beyond an architect's control than are under his command." The post started a debate among our readers as well as our editors at ArchDaily. Many readers bemoaned the demise of architecture at the hands of clients with big pockets. Some of us talked about how IT giants not only control our digital world, they are now also encroaching upon our urban environments. Several readers blamed big clients for creating starchitects who build grand buildings and, as they allege, cause an "infantalisation" of architecture in the process. Here at ArchDaily, our editors got to thinking:
Fun Palace, from Cedric Price, conceived as as laboratory of fun and a university of the streets, was more a manifesto rather than an actual project. Gift of The Howard Gilman Foundation. Image © MoMA - The Museum of Modern Art
In-progress: 'Dreamcatcher' project, designed and built by Natura Futura + Ruta 4, alongside architecture students in Canoa, a town affected by a 7.8-magnitude earthquake in Ecuador in 2016. Image © Nicolas Valencia
Très Grande Bibliothèque, Competition 1989. Honorable Mention. Great exemple of an amazing project, never built. Image © OMA
Très Grande Bibliothèque, Competition 1989. Honorable Mention. Great exemple of an amazing project, never built. Image © OMA
In this 'DesignLab', created by C.F. Møller, the architects invite the clients to evaluate the spaces in cardboard before being built. Image Courtesy of C.F. Møller
6-year-old Samuel proposes architecture as a refuge in this Spanish project called “Chiquitectos”. The project hopes to bring architecture to non-architects, and to increase children’s and young people’s interest in architecture. This is an example of what we need to do, as a whole, within our discipline. Image Courtesy of Chiquitectos
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Architecture as Experiential Marketing: The Surprisingly Bright Olympic Pavilion by Hyundai and Asif Khan

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© Keshia Badalge © Keshia Badalge

Much has been said about the darkest building in the world, designed by Asif Khan, for Hyundai's Winter Olympic pavilion this year. What’s more surprising about this blackest-of-black pavilion is really how bright it is inside. The imposing facade of Vantablack VBx2 encloses a series of radiant, playful rooms and the entire project is part of a joint effort by Hyundai and Asif Khan to use architecture and design principles to bring delight to Olympic visitors in Pyeongchang this year.

Hyundai decided to sign on as a sponsor for the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics and commissioned the British architect, Asif Khan, to bring their brand vision to a physical space. The specific assignment—delivered by Hyundai's Creative Works—emphasized the fact that the built space had to convey a powerful experience without showing any of their products.

Initial Concept Sketch Initial Concept Sketch

In an interview with ArchDaily, Mr.

Hydrogen Layout Diagram
Hydrogen Section Diagram
Floor Plan
© Keshia Badalge
© Light Up Your Energy
© Kyungsub Shin
© Kyungsub Shin
© Kyungsub Shin
© José Tomás Franco
© Light Up Your Energy
© José Tomás Franco
© José Tomás Franco
© Light Up Your Energy
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