In World’s First 3-D Printed Home Community, Houses will be Built in a Day for $4000

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Courtesy of ICON and New Story Courtesy of ICON and New Story Editor's Note: This story was originally published 27 March 2018. It was recently announced that ICON, the construction company leading the project, has successfully raised $9 million in seed funding for the project. A new video of the project is included below.  Tech gets a bad rap for serving developed economies in the interest of money-making. It often takes a few cycles for the technologies that are truly helpful to reach the developing world, hence the unfortunate, slow-draining term called the “trickle effect.”

ICON, a construction company in Austin, Texas, and New Story, a non-profit focusing on housing, have come up with a 3D printer that can build move-in-ready houses for just $4000. The printer, called the Vulcan, is capable of printing a 650sqft, single-story home out of cement in 12-24 hours. And perhaps as a small way to upturn the trajectory of innovation, they are

Courtesy of ICON and New Story
Courtesy of ICON and New Story
Courtesy of ICON and New Story
Courtesy of ICON and New Story
Courtesy of ICON and New Story
Courtesy of ICON and New Story
Courtesy of ICON and New Story
Courtesy of ICON and New Story
Continue reading "In World’s First 3-D Printed Home Community, Houses will be Built in a Day for $4000"

At Prague’s Signal Festival 2018, a Historic City Is Seen in Modern Light

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/at-pragues-signal-festival-2018-a-historic-city-is-seen-in-modern-light/signal-2018_filip_obr_8/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/10/SIGNAL-2018_Filip_Obr_8-810x540.jpg" alt="At Prague&#8217;s Signal Festival 2018, a Historic City Is Seen in Modern Light" /></a>
                                Earlier this month we traveled to <a href="https://www.signalfestival.com/en/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Signal Festival</a>, the largest cultural event in the Czech Republic, and it&#8217;s not just light art enthusiasts that flock to Prague for this once-a-year event, now in its 6th edition. Signal Festival is to the Czech Republic what Carnival is to Brazil: it&#8217;s a way (albeit nascent for now) for a small nation to come together to observe, appreciate and play in the capital city&#8217;s streets and urban spaces.

Photo by Dusan Vondra

This year’s festival took place along three routes: Centrum (the historic city centre), Vinohrady and Karlin. For four evenings, historic sites, palaces and national libraries were transformed by light into modern design installations. For a first time visitor such as myself, it was a rather practical and ideal way to experience a new city and the secret places it holds. Without any notion of where to go and what to
Continue reading "At Prague’s Signal Festival 2018, a Historic City Is Seen in Modern Light"

Helsinki Design Week 2018: Behind the Scenes Marimekko Factory Tour

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/helsinki-design-week-2018-marimekko-behind-the-scenes-factory-tour/unikko/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/10/Unikko.jpg" alt="Helsinki Design Week 2018: Behind the Scenes Marimekko Factory Tour" /></a>
                                Nordic design studios are known for their simple shapes and clean, reductive patterns. The industry here, whether in interior design or architecture, favors natural products and practical designs. Given the extreme seasons, with close to full days of sunlight in the summer and prolonged hours of night in the winter, it is necessary for inner space to be comfortable and practical, warm and bright.
Finnish design can take the next step to prominence when it breaks away from the Nordic typecast, and it does so best when it is able to touch on history and the value of freedom and equality in Finnish society today. In this regard, the Finnish design studio Marimekko has made great leaps in taking their designs to a personal level. Instead of cool tones and simple shades that are trademark of Nordic design, Marimekko’s aesthetic is warm and bright, playful and homey. At Helsinki Design Week
Continue reading "Helsinki Design Week 2018: Behind the Scenes Marimekko Factory Tour"

Helsinki Design Week 2018: Behind the Scenes Marimekko Factory Tour

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/helsinki-design-week-2018-marimekko-behind-the-scenes-factory-tour/unikko/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/10/Unikko.jpg" alt="Helsinki Design Week 2018: Behind the Scenes Marimekko Factory Tour" /></a>
                                Nordic design studios are known for their simple shapes and clean, reductive patterns. The industry here, whether in interior design or architecture, favors natural products and practical designs. Given the extreme seasons, with close to full days of sunlight in the summer and prolonged hours of night in the winter, it is necessary for inner space to be comfortable and practical, warm and bright.
Finnish design can take the next step to prominence when it breaks away from the Nordic typecast, and it does so best when it is able to touch on history and the value of freedom and equality in Finnish society today. In this regard, the Finnish design studio Marimekko has made great leaps in taking their designs to a personal level. Instead of cool tones and simple shades that are trademark of Nordic design, Marimekko’s aesthetic is warm and bright, playful and homey. At Helsinki Design Week
Continue reading "Helsinki Design Week 2018: Behind the Scenes Marimekko Factory Tour"

At Homo Faber, Luxury Craftspeople from Hermes, Mont Blanc Show The Value of Hand-Produced Crafts

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/homo-faber-luxury-craftspeople-hermes-mont-blanc-show-value-hand-produced-crafts/eilean-homo-faber-2/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/10/eilean-homo-faber-2-810x540.jpeg" alt="At Homo Faber, Luxury Craftspeople from Hermes, Mont Blanc Show The Value of Hand-Produced Crafts" /></a>
                                Venice, home of the world&#8217;s most famous architecture biennale and art biennale, has a new reason to stake its claim as the European centre for craftsmanship. The premier event of <a href="https://www.homofaberevent.com/en"  data-wpel-link="external" rel="external noopener noreferrer"><em>Homo Faber </em>(&#8220;Made by Man&#8221;)</a>, a biennale that showcases and supports the artisans who dedicate themselves to the mastery of craftsmanship, took place at Fondazione Giorgio Cini on the Isola di San Giorgio Maggiore last month.
When digital tools and modern technology can 3-D print an entire house — interiors and all — in a day, the luxury brands at the exhibition nevertheless insist that their fine work is made best by hand. The event’s tagline, “Crafting a More Human Experience,” was distilled to the audience not only by emphasizing the virtue of the human-made products. Homo Faber curator Alberto Cavalli spoke bluntly about how craftsman took a blow when times were bad. He underscored the difficult realities of
Continue reading "At Homo Faber, Luxury Craftspeople from Hermes, Mont Blanc Show The Value of Hand-Produced Crafts"

Soho House Amsterdam Adds to Trend of International Chains Catering to Digital Nomads

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/soho-house-amsterdam-adds-trend-international-chains-catering-digital-nomads/soho-house/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/09/soho-house-810x528.jpg" alt="Soho House Amsterdam Adds to Trend of International Chains Catering to Digital Nomads" /></a>
                                <a href="http://www.sohohouse.com/"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Soho House</a>, a private members’ club for creatives, expanded to Amsterdam this summer. The <a href="http://sohohouseamsterdam.com/en"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Soho House Amsterdam</a> establishment has taken over the Bungehuis, an old 1930s university building on the Spuistraat that overlooks the canal, and spruced it up with their signature interiors and furnishings. The building now accommodates 79 bedrooms, a rooftop pool, an entire floor of club space, as well as Italian dining at Cecconi’s restaurant and a Cowshed spa on the ground floor.
And of course, it being located in Amsterdam, there will also be space to park 75 bikes and a workshop for repairs. The six story high Bungehuis building is a distinct landmark along the Amsterdam canal, with a stark limestone and granite facade contrasted against bronze bay windows. What makes this space even more spectacular is that it is only one of two buildings in Amsterdam with a rooftop pool. If the Dutch
Continue reading "Soho House Amsterdam Adds to Trend of International Chains Catering to Digital Nomads"

Mikiya Kobayashi on Making Harmony with Space Through Furniture

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/mikiya-kobayashi-making-harmony-space-furniture/m-glw2lg/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/08/M-gLw2Lg.jpeg" alt="Mikiya Kobayashi on Making Harmony with Space Through Furniture" /></a>
                                Playgrounds don&#8217;t always need to be furnished with items designed for children. <a href="http://mikiyakobayashi.com/"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Mikiya Kobayashi</a> held an exhibition, <em><a href="https://www.playscape.tokyo/"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Playscape</a>,</em> in his Tokyo design shop to show that there&#8217;s an opportunity for furniture to interact with everyone and create a poetic landscape. The exhibition showcases various park-like furnitures such as a swing, seesaw, rocking chair, mountain and cradle.
Each piece is made from Japanese hardwood and covered with Kvadrat textiles in shades of black and white, orange and blue. Mikiya Kobayashi was born in Tokyo in 1981 and graduated from Mushashino Art University in 2005. In 2006, after working at Field Four Design Office in Japan, he started his own studio, “Mikiya Kobayashi Design.” Kobayashi first opened his design store in 2006 and named it “Taiyou no Shita” but changed the name to “Increments” this Summer to commemorate the move. The Playscapes exhibition was held to mark the
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The Crazy Rich Asians Guide to Design and Architecture in Singapore

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/crazy-rich-asians-guide-design-architecture-singapore/1280px-high_in_the_supertrees_unsplash/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/09/1280px-High_in_the_SuperTrees_Unsplash-810x539.jpg" alt="The Crazy Rich Asians Guide to Design and Architecture in Singapore" /></a>
                                Singapore&#8217;s art and culture has never been in so big a spotlight.
Crazy Rich Asians, a movie based on a book by Singaporean author Kevin Kwan, has topped the US box office two weekends in a row and is set to make history this summer. The movie takes place in Singapore and depicts a glamorous city with mansions, exotic foods and well-heeled Asians in fashionable clothes. (Coming from a Singaporean, let me tell you: Singapore is not all like that, although you can choose to only see the rich aspects of the city if you want to.) What the movie does well, though, is shed light on our unique design culture. A short history lesson: we were a Malay village first, then a British colony, and we were occupied by the Japanese during World War II, returned to British hands at the end of the war, merged with
Continue reading "The Crazy Rich Asians Guide to Design and Architecture in Singapore"

In Jerusalem, a Matchmaker Pairs Mature Artisans with Young Designers

                                <em>We visited Jerusalem Design Week where Daniel Nahmias exhibited &#8220;Matchmaker,&#8221; a collection to promote traditional craftsmanship in Jerusalem by coming up with new collaborations between older artisans and young designers.</em>
                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/jerusalem-matchmaker-scouts-for-artisans-young-designers/or-kaplan-6305_preview/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/07/or-kaplan-6305_preview-810x540.jpeg" alt="In Jerusalem, a Matchmaker Pairs Mature Artisans with Young Designers" /></a>
                                “I love walking around this place. There’s all sorts of people with crazy talent. You never know who you will meet,” Daniel Nahmias says as we follow him through the Old City of Jerusalem in the midday heat. It is our first day in Israel, and even though some of us have begun to tire with the weather, Nahmias has a sprightly spirit that makes us pick up our pace. It’s the same spirit we will later come to associate with his work. He leads us with childlike excitement through the alleyways and stone streets, through one turn and then another, through quarters unexplored by even the Jerusalemites themselves.

Photo by Or Kaplan

Photo by Or Kaplan

We turn a corner filled with
Continue reading "In Jerusalem, a Matchmaker Pairs Mature Artisans with Young Designers"

Highlights from Design Tokyo 2018: Be a Scent DJ and More

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/highlights-design-tokyo-2018/modoo_fr-005/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/07/modoo_fr.005-810x456.jpg" alt="Highlights from Design Tokyo 2018: Be a Scent DJ and More" /></a>
                                <a href="http://www.designtokyo.jp/en/"  rel="noopener external noreferrer" data-wpel-link="external">Design Tokyo</a> has become the one-stop destination for Japanese designers and vendors, and its profile has strengthened over the years ever since Tokyo Design Week was phased out in 2016. Over 90,000 people attended the 3-day event in Tokyo Big Sight last week. Here are the highlights from Design Tokyo:
Moodo is a smart home fragrant diffuser produced by the Israeli company Agan Aroma. Agan Aroma has been concocting scents for 35 years (many of which are likely used in perfumes you owned!) and they’ve created an IoT home system so you can control the scent of your home.

Courtesy of Moodo.

Moodo works with Alexa and Google Assistant. You can create a unique ambiance instantly by using a smartphone app or voice control. The app also comes with preset families of scents that you can purchase. Shuffle through the scent families so that you’ll be introduced to a
Continue reading "Highlights from Design Tokyo 2018: Be a Scent DJ and More"

Stitched in the desert: Iota’s Products Are Made by Bedouin Women in the Negev

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/stitched-desert-iotas-products-made-bedouin-women-negev/or-kaplan-6235/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/06/or-kaplan-6235-810x540.jpg" alt="Stitched in the desert: Iota’s Products Are Made by Bedouin Women in the Negev" /></a>
                                A home interiors and accessories company is providing jobs for Bedouin women who aren’t allowed to hold employment outside of their home. Tal Zur, CEO of <a href="https://iotaproject.com/" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Iota Hand Stitched</a>, speaks to Design Milk about why they think “soft furniture” is the next home design frontier, how they found themselves in the Negev, and where their designs are going this summer!

Tal Zur, CEO of Iota Studio. Photo by Or Kaplan.

Design Milk’s Keshia Badalge at Iota Hand Stitched in Tel Aviv, Israel.

“If you want a product that is straight, where all the sides are equal, the color is all the same, then that’s not us. Our products are alive,” Zur tells us as we sit in her studio in Tel Aviv. And sure enough, her studio emulates that same liveliness, with hanging swings, chunky-knit rugs and pillows and shelves full of colorful yarn, specifically put together by a
Continue reading "Stitched in the desert: Iota’s Products Are Made by Bedouin Women in the Negev"

Rem Koolhaas and Son Tomas Talk About The Years-Long Process of Shooting “REM”

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Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas

ArchDaily had the chance to catch Rem Koolhaas and his son, Tomas Koolhaas, together, when they met for a weekend in Los Angeles. In their first ever interview together, following the release of “REM” online, we spoke with the pair about the documentary that was four years in the making. The film had Tomas following his father from the desert to the ocean to the 2014 Venice Biennale, as well as inside several OMA projects around the world, like the Seattle Central Library in America and Maison à Bordeaux in France.

The pair reveal what their father-son relationship is like, how the profession of architecture and filmmaking inform each other, and shine a light on the challenges of filming a well-known family member. Work aside, what came across the most strongly throughout the conversation was the respect they had for each other’s craft, and their
Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas
Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas
Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas
Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas
Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas
Courtesy of Tomas Koolhaas
Continue reading "Rem Koolhaas and Son Tomas Talk About The Years-Long Process of Shooting “REM”"

At Romanian Design Week: An Intimate Creative Economy

                                                <a href="https://design-milk.com/romanian-design-week-intimate-creative-economy/fashion-exhibition-romanian-2/" data-wpel-link="internal"><img src="https://design-milk.com/images/2018/05/Fashion-exhibition-Romanian-1-810x540.png" alt="At Romanian Design Week: An Intimate Creative Economy" /></a>
                                This month, The Institute in Romania presented its 6th edition of <a href="http://www.institute.ro/romanian-design-week" data-wpel-link="external"  rel="external noopener noreferrer">Romanian Design Week</a> in the capital of Bucharest. Romania may not be a staple destination in the European design circuit; a communist country until the 1989 Romanian Revolution, it is more known for associations with Dracula, stuffed cabbage leaves and traditional peasant huts in the countryside. Now, Romania’s design aesthetic is in a state of free, thoughtful reinvention. This year’s presentation showed a strong contingent of young designers, many of whom have returned from working abroad, and are bent on merging traditional Romanian style with their international influences.
Romanian Design Week attracts 30,000 visitors each year, and to their credit, they have done this with no government backing. Instead, the festival is put together by The Institute, an organization providing an “ecosystem for creative industries in Romania.” Maria Neneciu, a program manager at The Institute, says the design
Continue reading "At Romanian Design Week: An Intimate Creative Economy"

What Makes a City Livable to You?

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© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/132839384@N08/17241901246'>Flickr user Hafitz Maulana</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. ImageA music festival in Singapore © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/132839384@N08/17241901246'>Flickr user Hafitz Maulana</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. ImageA music festival in Singapore

Mercer released their annual list of the Most Livable Cities in the World last month. The list ranks 231 cities based on factors such as crime rates, sanitation, education and health standards, with Vienna at #1 and Baghdad at #231. There’s always some furor over the results, as there ought to be when a city we love does not make the top 20, or when we see a city rank highly but remember that one time we visited and couldn’t wait to leave.

To be clear, Mercer is a global HR consultancy, and their rankings are meant to serve the multinational corporations that are their clients. The list helps with relocation packages and remuneration for their employees. But a company’s first choice on where to send their workers is

The streets of Santiago, Chile. Image © Maria Gonzalez Reginato
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/design_aditi/15988588224/'>Flickr user design_aditi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>. ImageA street festival in Singapore
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/66944824@N05/11249849026/in/photolist-i97qbf-in4tDU-ouUUS8-ouUUNv-o468VL-22u3o-77zBQK-okzUWk-4cAvW8-jHx8Qd-3r86YN-apw4LF-boYsYa-cj8Qm5-in4oCJ-BF73uy-6C9B7f-o46oq5-fzv2rS-6uPEp7-oky56U-vG5hx-ppsZVB-XhvETP-cqV7Kb-7RVnL9-a9ENQe-fzfQSD-6f6CA7-o47kpc-pbvVQ-8Yd5V4-fzfHHn-cAKU1y-hkX2of-hEBytM-6wECzG-6CmjxH-edYxPD-6cYNCG-umAAh-fzfHng-fzfSTt-6yvsZE-YoA4wh-cuEbk-6C4hDJ-7DKHWK-2MeYUH-7xXSoW'>Flickr user Denis Bocquet</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>. ImageA void deck in Singapore with food and community spaces
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/alessandrocapotondi/4005051491/in/photolist-76UWgV-3KxvAU-axpJG3-p3w1ZV-dqXUxr-332JeD-Up7GQ2-7sZSD9-anHhcu-egDRSz-9uNyFp-73qEgr-9Hi1f-Tj8YqE-4edThh-a823nT-C8VAq-br4AXA-7hXpLB-7YDTcv-a84UJW-8KaAPw-C8VxB-TmZAwg-4RkJqt-3pxtCA-6NZh7w-Tj9DBA-9uRtV7-NnyY5-3roqLV-7JAE7L-a84UDU-enqTJQ-3pxBCw-8PRnY-9uNxG4-5AhcxR-j1Dte-8P7TaB-UmoQQC-TjaHa5-7YDSW4-7YDTAP-73tB3q-73uxXh-3pLYiy-3pxuvb-VyJQk-73q5hV'>Flickr user Alessandro Capotondi</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. ImageSpanish Steps in Rome
The streets of São Paulo, Brazil. Image © Victor Delaqua
An elderly man at Ópera, one of the busiest intersections in Paris. Image © Keshia Badalge
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/luca_volpi/7349601514/in/album-72157630076290206/'>Flickr user Luca Volip</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>. ImageCasa Verdi in Milan
V&A Museum along Exhibition Road. Image © Keshia Badalge
Streets and flags. Image © Victor Delaqua
Celebrating the Euro Cup on Champ de Mars, Paris. Image © Keshia Badalge
A music performance in the Paris metro station. Image © Keshia Badalge
Continue reading "What Makes a City Livable to You?"

A New Roof by Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos Turned This Ancient German Castle Into an Enlarged Exhibition Space

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© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu The Moritzburg castle in the city of Halle is exemplary of the Gothic military architecture in 15th century Germany. Despite the partial destruction of the north and west wings during the Thirty Years War, the site has managed to retain most of its original features: a surrounding wall, three of the four round towers at the corners, and a central courtyard.

But more importantly, the castle has been home to an art museum since 1904. The challenge arose when this exhibition space needed to be expanded, without modifying or adding onto the original columns. With some genius and creativity, Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos created a new exhibition space based on a single, clear architectural idea: a new roof. 

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Moritzburg castle was already host to a notable collection of modern art, mostly German Expressionism paintings, for over a century. So when the museum received a large donation

© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
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© Laurian Ghinitoiu
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Continue reading "A New Roof by Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos Turned This Ancient German Castle Into an Enlarged Exhibition Space"

Gjøde & Partnere Arkitekter’s Sculpture By The Sea Transforms Cottesloe Beach Into Floating Desert Island

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© Ross Duggan © Ross Duggan On The Desert Island in Cottesloe Beach, Australia, a 72-meter wall of mirrors partitions out a section of the sand, creating a cove of its own. The wall faces the Indian Ocean, and the curved reflection of sand merging with the soft-blue waters and the horizon beyond creates an illusion of an enclosed space; a desert island floating in an endless sea. Conceived of by the Danish architecture studio Gjøde & Partnere Arkitekter, the installation was brought to life in Australia during the annual Sculpture By The Sea exhibition last month. It is the largest free public sculpture exhibition in the world, and anyone can submit their ideas. As beachgoers stumbled upon this panorama of the shore upon sand, they danced, took photos, and watched the sunset from the wavering reflections of the mythical island.
© David Dare Parker © David Dare Parker
© Clyde Yee © Clyde Yee
© Richard Watson © Richard Watson

It is a sublime installation, where isolation

© Richard Watson
© Gjøde & Partnere Arkitekter
© Gjøde & Partnere Arkitekter
© Gjøde & Partnere Arkitekter
© Gjøde & Partnere Arkitekter
© Gjøde & Partnere Arkitekter
Continue reading "Gjøde & Partnere Arkitekter’s Sculpture By The Sea Transforms Cottesloe Beach Into Floating Desert Island"

Laurian Ghinitoiu Captures Dreamlike Nature of Junya Ishigami’s Work at Fondation Cartier in Paris

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© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu From March 30 to June 10, 2018, the Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain will host Junya Ishigami's exhibition, Freeing Architecture. This is the first major solo exhibition that the Fondation Cartier in Paris has devoted to an architect, and fitting that it would lend itself to an important and singular figure of Japan's young architecture scene. Ishigami - winner of the Golden Lion award at the Venice Biennale in 2010 - has instilled this conceptual body of work with his trademark flair: calm, free fluidity, with bright tones and playful curves. The projects in the exhibition range from large scale models to films and drawings, and when placed in the context of the exhibition, they bring to life Jean Nouvel's iconic building as well. Laurian Ghinitoiu gives us a glimpse inside the exhibition ahead of the opening day tomorrow. His photos reveal the lightness and ethereal quality
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
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Continue reading "Laurian Ghinitoiu Captures Dreamlike Nature of Junya Ishigami’s Work at Fondation Cartier in Paris"

BIG’s Shenzhen International Energy Mansion Captured by Laurian Ghinitoiu

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© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu The Shenzhen International Energy Mansion is the main headquarters of the Shenzhen Energy Company in China. In designing the building, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) paid special attention to one feature: the building's facade. The firm knew that in such a tropical climate, using a traditional curtain wall glass envelope would overheat the buildings and make people crank up their air conditioners. What BIG came up with in their winning design, and what is now the building's most defining feature, is a folded, origami-like facade. This facade provides high insulation and diffuses incoming sunlight, while reflecting the strongest rays onto solar panels.

Laurian Ghinitoiu points his lens towards this uncommon facade design and places the skyscraper within the lively metropolitan context of Shenzhen, China. 

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
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Continue reading "BIG’s Shenzhen International Energy Mansion Captured by Laurian Ghinitoiu"

Why Does The Gender Pay Gap Issue Make People Uncomfortable?

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Foster + Partners' London office, Riverside. Image © Marc Goodwin Foster + Partners' London office, Riverside. Image © Marc Goodwin

Last week, ArchDaily covered a story about the gender pay gap at Foster + Partners. We thought such a story was "unsurprising" given that the gender pay gap is something that is widely reported on, and present in almost every industry, and we wanted to share a case of it happening in an architectural firm many of us are familiar with. What we did not expect was that readers would think it is a non-issue, or that such reporting was sensational. Is it possible for us to talk about gender in the workplace without being up in arms? Why does the gender pay gap issue make people uncomfortable? 

Some of our editors discussed how gender plays into their workplace experiences as well as some hopeful recent signs that we are on a path to change.

Joanna Wong: I think it’s important to first outline

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