Lucasz Kos creates a mesmerizing villa in busy Shanghai

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/99/99a6d5e028970035146e0097eb6a96df.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />Located in the busy city of&nbsp;<a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/11467/shanghai" rel="nofollow" >Shanghai</a>&nbsp;is a tranquil villa that transports you into a lucid state of living. <a href="https://archinect.com/firms/cover/150091030/kos-architects" rel="nofollow" >Kos Architects</a>&nbsp;in collaboration with&nbsp;<a href="https://www.zerebecky.com/" rel="nofollow" >Atelier Zerebecky</a>,&nbsp;have recently completed construction of Cloud Villa. The blissfully serene three-story home exudes a peacefully private experience. Its grand central <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/155355/staircase" rel="nofollow" >staircase</a>, the centerpiece of the space, connects each section of the home. If that wasn't enough to create an almost etherial experience, the 8-meter high vaulted ceiling of the main living room adds to its heavenly interior.&nbsp;
© Highlite Images Taipei
© Highlite Images Taipei
As inhabitants of the home make their way through the various levels of the house, the abstract form of the staircase creates a seamless transition from the upper, middle, and lower levels. The light and airy interior focuses on a clean and contemporary aesthetic. Identifying as the architect of peace and quiet, Lukasz Kos' Cloud Villa,
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Winners of Australia’s 2018 National Landscape Architecture Awards have been announced

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/7p/7peufj2p2j2sj6ni.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />Highlighting the work of&nbsp;<a href="http://bustler.net/news/search/landscape%20" >landscape</a> architects and their growing contribution in various regional and metropolitan areas, the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA) have awarded 38 winners for this year's event. Submissions in over 14 categories were reviewed. AILA National Awards Jury Chair Sara Kjaersgaard stated, &ldquo;the awarded projects are sensitive, thoughtful and ambitious responses to repairing and improving our <a href="http://bustler.net/news/search/australia/6862/the-winning-2018-lagi-melbourne-public-art-proposals" >Australian</a> landscapes...&rdquo;
Coinciding with the AILA's International Festival of Landscape Architecture, the event helped promote the role the profession has in impacting social and economic challenges in Australia. With the current state of Australia's growth in urbanization and its adaptation to climate change, landscape architects are able to develop and showcase projects with the help of programs like the AILA. Submitted projects focused on open and public spaces in Australia and their collaboration with green/sustainable design. 

knowhow shop design offers a new approach to office construction

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/dd/dd05816a022fb44f55cd436725b7ec6a.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>LA-based design-build practice knowhow shop introduces their studio space &lsquo;lighthouse&rsquo; as a micro-building designed and built like a piece of furniture. Founders Kagan Taylor and Justin Rice, through their commitment to both traditional craft and contemporary digital fabrication, have turned away from typical details and assembly systems in favor of more experimental methods of construction.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Diverting from traditional construction processes, the founders of <a href="https://archinect.com/knowhowshopla" rel="nofollow" >knowhow shop</a>, focus on the possibility of constructing an&nbsp;<a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/65945/office-design" rel="nofollow" >office</a> testing their skills as craftsmen while challenging their understanding of spatial perception.&nbsp;
Image © Stephen Schauer
The office's unique shape and construction materials were custom designed by the founders themselves. A project, whose intricacies add to the stylistic beauty of the structure, "could not have been easily done by a contractor" claims the studio. Each facet of the structure used mitered SIPs and shop fabricated materials to accomplish the craft like aesthetic. Its overall form exhibits
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Alejandro Arevena’s alluring concrete vacation home

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/a9/a96210cb8e3b2890321bc32824bdd682.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>The radical, four-bedroom vacation house is part of the Ochoalcubo project &ndash; a pioneering &lsquo;architectural laboratory&rsquo; led by the entrepreneur and architecture lover Eduardo Godoy. Leading Chilean and Japanese practices including Aravena, Smiljan Radic, Toyo Ito and Sou Fujimoto were asked to design a series of ground-breaking homes on the coast of Ochoquebradas.</p></em><br /><br /><p><a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/51168/pritzker-prize" rel="nofollow" >Pritzker Prize</a>-winner&nbsp;<a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/598317/alejandro-aravena" rel="nofollow" >Alejandro Aravena</a> uses the Chilean landscape of&nbsp;Coquimbo to create a weekend home oozing with dramatic appeal and a moody ancient beauty. The vacation home is comprised of three large <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/9438/concrete" rel="nofollow" >concrete</a> volumes specifically stacked one against the other. Sitting on a hilltop overlooking the Chilean coast, the home, at first glance exudes an "ancient" looking quality.&nbsp;
Image via Chile Sotheby’s International Realty
The massively rugged, boulder like structure was heavily influenced by primitivistic values. Its simplistic exterior is carried through out the entire house. The interiority of the space reflects modernist principles that focus
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Stella Lee’s story calls for architecture to adopt a new movement

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/50/50f0487258b50225f6d55a129f95c4ed.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>Architectural education is plagued by the mentality that suffering is a necessary part of its practice. [...] The acceptance of suffering easily slips into normalizing sexual misconduct and its suppression as simply part of the practice. Cultlike worship of the star architect only exacerbates this condition, and there are plenty [...] willing to sacrifice their time and integrity because they have been conditioned to believe that this mode of production is normal.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The architecture world is known for many movements that have enabled architects to create iconic works. From bauhaus to brutalist, midcentury modern to contemporary, countless movements have impacted the architectural timeline. But in today's climate of inclusivity and representation is there one movement in particular that architecture is too slow to adopt?&nbsp;
Designing physical spaces that represent an artistic representation of form and function is something many architects strive for. However, have firms and institutions
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Shenzhen’s elevated garden will bring pedestrians to the sky

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/21/2173d42f439b6c21a27ed7e2f6bc2b3a.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>&ldquo;Given the diversity of the buildings emerging within the Qianhai area, our preference was for a simple, bold, and confident insertion into the existing master plan,&rdquo; says Spence. &ldquo;The formality derives from the existing road grid and building plots, combined with our desire to maximize the area of raised green park linking the city to the bay. It creates a new horizon against which people can orientate.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>In the bustling city of Shenzen, the growing metropolis that bridges Hong Kong to <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/643/china" rel="nofollow" >China's</a> mainland, an exciting <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/226067/sky-garden" rel="nofollow" >sky garden</a> project will bring the city's transportation infrastructure to the sky. The team at&nbsp;Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners are creating a mile long elevated pathway. The main function of these elevated gardens, according to building developers, is to transition <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/666662/pedestrians" rel="nofollow" >pedestrians</a> from the ground level to <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/13491/skyscraper" rel="nofollow" >skyscrapers</a> in the city center.&nbsp;
Image via Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
Creating this separation of transit Continue reading "Shenzhen’s elevated garden will bring pedestrians to the sky"

Steven Chilton Architects design an ethereally serene bamboo themed theatre

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/1u/1u0uz0954hztaqnz.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><p>Nestled in the Jiangsu Province, the architects at SCA | Steven Chilton Architects were inspired by the Sea of Bamboo Park in Yixing China to create a beautiful 2000 seat theatre. The Wuxi TAIHU Theatre, a finalist in this year's <a href="http://bustler.net/news/tags/world-architecture-festival/974/6626/the-world-architecture-festival-has-announced-its-shortlist-for-the-2018-awards" >World Architecture Festival</a>, was designed to represent an abstract representation of the largest bamboo forest in China .The World Architecture festival is a platform for architects to present completed buildings and future projects. The SCA team presented this theatre concept which subtly transforms the surrounding area into a serene bamboo dreamland. The structure's tall bamboo like columns and shaded canopy create a mesmerizing partition between the building's facade and the surrounding landscape.&nbsp;</p>           

Steven Chilton Architects design an ethereally serene bamboo themed theatre

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/1u/1u0uz0954hztaqnz.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><p>Nestled in the Jiangsu Province, the architects at SCA | Steven Chilton Architects were inspired by the Sea of Bamboo Park in Yixing China to create a beautiful 2000 seat theatre. The Wuxi TAIHU Theatre, a finalist in this year's <a href="http://bustler.net/news/tags/world-architecture-festival/974/6626/the-world-architecture-festival-has-announced-its-shortlist-for-the-2018-awards" >World Architecture Festival</a>, was designed to represent an abstract representation of the largest bamboo forest in China .The World Architecture festival is a platform for architects to present completed buildings and future projects. The SCA team presented this theatre concept which subtly transforms the surrounding area into a serene bamboo dreamland. The structure's tall bamboo like columns and shaded canopy create a mesmerizing partition between the building's facade and the surrounding landscape.&nbsp;</p>           

Searching for a job in architectural academia? Here are 10 exciting new opportunities around the country

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/6b/6bffbf5009dfb76f2beab0dcd081ab6d.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />Architecture's presence in <a href="https://archinect.com/schools" rel="nofollow" >academia</a> plays an increasingly pivotal role in shaping and guiding new designers of the future. Many architects use their own experiences academically and professionally to instruct students in various capacities. Whether it be teaching in the studio, as a guest lecturer, or a <a href="https://archinect.com/features/tag/1073280/fellow-fellows" rel="nofollow" >university fellow</a>, working and interacting with the future minds of architecture is exciting as it is rewarding.&nbsp;
This week we have prepared a roundup of academic jobs recently posted by schools to Archinect Jobs.

UBDS Project RE_ Image via Carnegie Melon University
Carnegie Melon University is offering the Ann Kalla Professorship in Architecture
Carnegie Melon is looking for individuals with a strong background, or emerging potential, in creative architectural accomplishment that elevates the discipline through research work, scholarly work, artistic work, and/or professional practice.
Housing Exhibition Image via Columbia GSAPP
Columbia GSAPP is seeking a History/Theory of Architectur...

Neri Oxman: Architecture’s modern day Wonder Woman

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ec/ec011dd50028a67d5fb0de3076af8562.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>What makes Dr. Oxman, the scientist, so unusual, said Paola Antonelli, the senior curator of architecture and design at MoMA, is her aesthetic sense. &ldquo;She&rsquo;s not afraid of formal elegance,&rdquo; Ms. Antonelli said. &ldquo;The reason why she is a gift to the field of architecture and design is that her science works, her aesthetics work, and her theory works.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Tenured professor at the <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/533253/mit-media-lab" rel="nofollow" >Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Lab</a>, Dr. Neri Oxman's larger than life approach to architecture and design has continuously turned heads. Her impact in the world of architecture has led her to various breakthroughs in understanding the relationship and possibility between nature and the built environment.&nbsp;
Water based digital fabrication ©Neri Oxman | Behance
Coining the term, material ecology, Dr. Oxman and her motley crew at MIT has turned MIT's Medial Lab into a fantastically eccentric playground. Through digital fabrication, synthetic design, and
Continue reading "Neri Oxman: Architecture’s modern day Wonder Woman"

Muji’s apartment prototype tackles long commutes and highly dense cities

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/61/612a35c098925acb942bb828990266d3.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>Created for the annual exhibition House Vision, the prototype is a thought experiment in the way people live in super-dense cities. [...] It&rsquo;s a common problem in big cities all over the world, and Hasegawa&rsquo;s design is meant to balance space-saving with privacy, transforming a 1.5-story space (which are common across the city) into a usable space for four.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Highly-dense cities are common through out countries like China and Japan. Popular apparel and houseware brand, <a href="https://archinect.com/searchall/muji/news" rel="nofollow" >Muji</a>, are taking creative steps in tackling long commutes and dense city living most employees face. Partnering with Japanese architect, Go Hasegawa, Muji's apartment prototype aims to turn a 1.5 story space into a cozy and functional live-work environment.&nbsp;
Image courtesy of Nacása & Partners Inc. © HOUSE VISION
Equipped with an open communal space and kitchen, the Muji furnished apartment would have a balance of work functionality and privacy.
Continue reading "Muji’s apartment prototype tackles long commutes and highly dense cities"

Sou Fujimoto’s delicately powerful exhibition Futures of the Future comes to Los Angeles

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/uv/uvl9qtr1ro6ay4oh.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><p>Celebrated Japanese architect <a href="https://archinect.com/firms/cover/65588/sou-fujimoto-architects" >Sou Fujimoto</a> will be featuring <a href="http://bustler.net/events/11636/japan-house-los-angeles-presents-sou-fujimoto-s-futures-of-the-future" >Futures of the Future</a> at Japan House Los Angeles. Known to challenge and stimulate the balance of opposites in architecture, Fujimoto's work allows viewers to enter into the realm of possibility. The exhibit showcases 100 beautifully crafted models and large-scale photographs featuring Fujimoto's past and present work.</p>         

What we can learn from the devastating earthquake in Indonesia

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/1a/1a12e5c25f3a2c33b6775cbf0c679bf4.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>Building codes and standards in many countries require engineers to consider the effects of soil liquefaction in the design of new buildings and infrastructure such as bridges, embankment dams and retaining structures</p></em><br /><br /><p>After the devastating <a href="https://archinect.com/searchall/earthquake/news" rel="nofollow" >earthquake</a> that hit <a href="https://archinect.com/searchall/indonesia/news" rel="nofollow" >Indonesia</a>, scientists are relating building collapses to soil liquefaction. When overly saturated soil is heavily loosened by intense seismic activity, particles in the soil lose its bond and contact with each other. Thus resulting in its loss of stiffness and structural support. When soil deposits lose its ability to provide stability for foundations, the land quickly turns into a liquid flowing nightmare.
© Reuters
Dr. Stavroula Kontoe of Imperial College London highlights on this phenomena and provides a proactive perspective to preventing these disasters from happening in the future. Dr. Kontoe explains that soil liquefaction can be identified early on in a building's design process. If the correct mitigation techniques like
Continue reading "What we can learn from the devastating earthquake in Indonesia"

Snøhetta’s underwater restaurant is almost complete

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/17/17581c961c8448b645804d3e45749060.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>Five meters below the surface of the North Sea, near the southernmost tip of Norway, Europe's first underwater restaurant is nearing completion [...] The restaurant was built in about six months on a barge near the coast, then towed into position -- about 600 feet away -- with a heavy-lift vessel. To submerge the structure, containers filled with water were placed inside, before securing it to the sea floor with a total of 18 anchoring points.</p></em><br /><br /><p>In the southernmost tip of the <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/342/norway" rel="nofollow" >Norwegian</a> coastline, <a href="https://snohetta.com/project/352-under" rel="nofollow" >Sn&oslash;hetta</a>&nbsp;is in its final stages of completing the world's largest underwater <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/97867/restaurant" rel="nofollow" >restaurant</a>. Submerged five meters below the North Sea, the restaurant appropriately named <em>Under</em> is preparing for its debut in Spring 2019. This 110ft-long structure made its big plunge and was secured to the sea floor in&nbsp;July 2018. This rather delicate and exciting feat was a major milestone for the team.
© Aldo Amoretti
Continue reading "Snøhetta’s underwater restaurant is almost complete"

Postwar floating walkways finding a use in modern day London

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/f5/f5b5e29d856bf568e67f33119af6946e.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>They were planned after the second world war to whisk people above car-choked streets in the financial district, but remained unpopular and half-built. Now, pedestrian walkways are being reimagined for a 21st-century city</p></em><br /><br /><p>The "pedway" made its structural debut as a solution to providing a walkable, streamlined path for <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/666662/pedestrians" rel="nofollow" >pedestrians</a> in <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/722/london" rel="nofollow" ></a><a href="https://archinect.com/searchall/london/news" rel="nofollow" >London's</a> car stricken streets. However, what was devised as a plan to create an efficient walkway system, turned into an under appreciated and underwhelming concept.&nbsp;
Examples of early pedway systems can be referenced from London's financial centre in the late 1940's. Critiques of the pedway system and its feasibility has been dissected in the documentary, Elevating London, where UCL professor of planning Michael Hebbert discusses the pedway's progression over the years.
However, despite it's enigmatic evolution, architecture firms like Make Architects are finding ways to resurrect these floating walkway systems. Their most recent project on The London Wall Continue reading "Postwar floating walkways finding a use in modern day London"

Freeway underpasses are more than just dark empty spaces.

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/40/40789b0145b70d16bddaf34b3c58a7c0.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>The space under elevated highways are often dark, industrial, and empty. With so much capacity to create a vibrant public space, organizations and cities are exploring ways for creative development in the otherwise unused area.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Underpasses are often overlooked for their building potential, but cities like <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/1880/toronto" rel="nofollow" >Toronto</a> and <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/6226/zurich" rel="nofollow" >Zurich</a> are redefining the creative opportunity of these spaces. Underpass design is a great way for cities to enrich these often vacant industrial spaces and create areas for community&nbsp;engagement and activity.&nbsp;
In Toronto for example, The Bentway is a public space that made its public debut earlier this year. Under one of the busiest highways in Toronto, The Bentway spans over 1.75km creating a new scene for events and activities. Locals can enjoy a stroll through the community garden, enjoy public art shows, and participate in various events through out the year.  
Photo courtesy of www.thebentway.ca
Zurich
Continue reading "Freeway underpasses are more than just dark empty spaces."