IKEA’s SPACE10 Future-Living Lab is Researching the Future of “Co-Living”

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Courtesy of SPACE10 Courtesy of SPACE10

SPACE10, the future-living lab created by IKEA, announced this week a "playful research project" to investigate the future of co-living. One Shared House 2030, a website created in collaboration with New York-based designers Anton & Irene, asks members of the public to "apply" for acceptance to an imagined co-living community in the year 2030, outlining their preferences for the types of people they would like to live with, the way they would like the community to be organized, and the things they would be willing to share with others. SPACE10 hopes that the research project will provide information on whether co-living could offer potential solutions to issues such as rapid urbanization, loneliness, and the growing global affordable housing crisis.

Courtesy of SPACE10 Courtesy of SPACE10

Text description provided by SPACE10. Humans across the world are moving to cities in numbers we haven't experienced before. By 2030 almost 70 percent of the global population will live in cities, and some experts

Courtesy of SPACE10
Courtesy of SPACE10
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A Real-Estate Development and Culture Company Has Created an Exhibition Highlighting the Need to “Fight for Beauty”

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Courtesy of Westbank Courtesy of Westbank

“Beauty,” as Umberto Eco tells it, “has never been absolute and immutable but has taken on different aspects depending on the historical period and the country.” So how is beauty defined today in our increasingly globalized world? Perhaps a more interesting question to ask is whether arriving at such a conclusion remains relevant to our society.

Ian Gillespie believes it is. The founder of Westbank, a Vancouver-based real-estate development and culture company, Gillespie has undertaken a great number of projects throughout his career, building along with them a peculiar idea of beauty that has permeated every new endeavor and shaped his company’s mission to produce more layered, complex and enriching outcomes. Projects such as BIG’s Vancouver House or Kengo Kuma’s Alberni by Kuma propose a new dynamic for the city of Vancouver—one in which the developer looks beyond mere return on investment, focusing

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Courtesy of Westbank
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CEMEX Announces Mexico Winners In Their 2017 Building Awards

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The CEMEX Building Award recognizes the best projects in Mexico and the rest of the world that use concrete in a creative and innovative way, with a focus on sustainability and social welfare. This year, the award received 545 entries in its Mexican Edition, of which 18 were awarded prizes.  The awards ceremony took place on November 9th in Mexico City, with finalists attending from the Czech Republic, France, the United States, the United Arab Emirates and various countries from South America. The winners of the Mexico Edition were:

Mexico Edition Winners by Category

Residential Housing

Cortesía de CEMEX Cortesía de CEMEX

Acolhúas House / SPRB Arquitectos
Guadalajara, Jalisco

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Patio Infiltrado / PLUG Architectura
Mérida, Yucatán

Cortesía de CEMEX Cortesía de CEMEX

Oyamel House / RP Arquitectos
Xalapa, Veracruz

Affordable Housing

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La Sexta Apartments / AS Arquitectura y R79
Mérida, Yucatán

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Urvita / Greenfield
San Pedro Garza, Nuevo

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CEMEX Announces International Winners In Their 2017 Building Awards

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Cortesía de CEMEX Cortesía de CEMEX The CEMEX Building Award recognizes the best projects in Mexico and the rest of the world that use concrete in a creative and innovative way, with a focus on sustainability and social welfare. This year, the award received 70 entries in the 5 categories and 4 special awards of its International Edition.  Germany, Columbia, Costa Rica, the United Arab Emirates, Spain, the United States of America, France, Guatemala, Haiti, Latvia, Nicaragua, Panama, Poland, Puerto Rico, Czech Republic, Dominican Republic, and of course, Mexico were the countries that participated in the Awards. The ceremony was held on November 9th in Mexico City.  The winners were: 

International Edition Winners by Category

Residential Housing

Cortesía de CEMEX Cortesía de CEMEX

Concretus House / Singular Estudio
Alicante, Spain

Cortesía de CEMEX Cortesía de CEMEX

Acolhúas House / SPRB Arquitectos
Guadalajara, Mexico

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Casa C17 / Balmor Pereira + XXStudio
Villa del Rosario, Colombia

Affordable Housing

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“Urban Toys” Designed to Reactivate Underused Public Spaces in Mexico City

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Cortesía de Laboratorio para la Ciudad Cortesía de Laboratorio para la Ciudad How can play areas in cities open up new ways to interact with and experience space? This was the question that prompted Mexico City's Laboratorio para la Ciudad to host the "Urban Toys" competition, seeking architectural proposals for temporary urban interventions that will reactivate underused public spaces through play and amusement. 86 total proposals were received. 

"Urban toys" are multi-functional objects adapted to the public space where they are installed; they respond to children's demand for play areas and new ways to explore the world. They are artifacts that push the boundaries for playground equipment, defying the traditional play areas that are usually installed in public spaces, such as swing sets, slides and other standardized plastic modules. 

Each selected team will receive a prize of 50,000 Mexican pesos (approx 2,630 US Dollars), and the "urban toys" will soon be installed in three of Mexico City's public

Cortesía de PALMA Estudio
Cortesía de Estudio Oomo
Cortesía de Laboratorio para la Ciudad
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Mexican Cultural Heritage and New Technology Come Together in Interactive Chair

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The most recent Project by Okubo Studio is the Fulgar Chair, mixing traditional Mexican design with interactive technology and design to create a new piece of furniture with lights and personality. The Acapulco chair is emblematic of Mexican culture, which radically transforms not just its materials but its utility and environment.  The project arose from a desire to explore the ways in which artisan craftsmanship and tradition can hold a place in contemporary design. After 2 years of research, the designers decided to work with Mexican craftspeople to mix the cultural heritage with newer technology, coming up with a re-interpretation of the Acapulco chair. The result was an interactive chair that reacts when you get close to and sit in it.
Courtesy of Okubo Studio Courtesy of Okubo Studio
In seeking to develop a chair that responds to the person using it, its features look to establish a connection between the user and
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Mexican Cultural Heritage and New Technology Come Together in Interactive Chair

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The most recent Project by Okubo Studio is the Fulgar Chair, mixing traditional Mexican design with interactive technology and design to create a new piece of furniture with lights and personality. The Acapulco chair is emblematic of Mexican culture, which radically transforms not just its materials but its utility and environment.  The project arose from a desire to explore the ways in which artisan craftsmanship and tradition can hold a place in contemporary design. After 2 years of research, the designers decided to work with Mexican craftspeople to mix the cultural heritage with newer technology, coming up with a re-interpretation of the Acapulco chair. The result was an interactive chair that reacts when you get close to and sit in it.
Courtesy of Okubo Studio Courtesy of Okubo Studio
In seeking to develop a chair that responds to the person using it, its features look to establish a connection between the user and
Continue reading "Mexican Cultural Heritage and New Technology Come Together in Interactive Chair"

7 Abandoned and Deteriorating Latin American Architectural Classics

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© Luiz Seo © Luiz Seo

How many lives does a great work of architecture have? The first begins when it is built and inhabited, judged based on the quality of life it provides for its residents. The second comes generations later when it becomes historically significant and perhaps its original function no longer suits the demands of society. The value of such buildings is that they inform us about the past and for that reason their conservation is necessary.

However, in Latin America, there are countless cases of buildings of great architectural value that are in tragic states of neglect and deterioration. Seven such examples are:

1. Los Manantiales by Félix Candela
Mexico City, Mexico

Los Manatiales was built in 1957 in Xochimilco. It is a place of great cultural significance for Mexico City because of its pre-Hispanic origins. Its architect, Félix Candela, proposed a design that could be integrated

<a href='http://www.mural.com/aplicacioneslibre/articulo/default.aspx?id=910079&md5=9f7a891c529cc53ec77c6bf300f4b404&ta=0dfdbac11765226904c16cb9ad1b2efe'>via Mural</a>. Image via Mural
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Ladera de la Misericordia. Image © Flickr Adalberto Vilela
Invernadero Quinta Normal. Image via Plataforma Urbana
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Are Luis Barragán’s Ashes More Important Than His Life’s Work?

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Una pieza de la exposición. Image Cortesía de Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo Una pieza de la exposición. Image Cortesía de Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo

In a somewhat poetic proposal, Jill Magid, the American artist, offered Federica Zano, owner, and archivist of the Barragan Foundation in Switzerland, a two-carat diamond ring containing ashes from Barragan’s cremation, in exchange for returning Barragan’s professional archive to Mexico

This gesture was the pinnacle of an art project that “posed fundamental questions about the consequences and implications of converting cultural legacy into private corporate property”. Magid’s work, titled “A Letter Always Arrives at its Destination”, held an exhibition at the University Museum of Contemporary Art at the UNAM.

I recently visited the exhibition and bumped into an acquaintance in the second room. She was overwhelmed by the number of pieces in the exhibit but had not seen the famed and controversial ring, and asked me if I’d seen it. I responded that it

Cena que organizó la artista con la familia de Luis Barragán. Image Cortesía de Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo
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Biking Through Denmark: Highlights of Copenhagen’s Architecture Festival

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© Kasper Nyobo © Kasper Nyobo This year's Copenhagen Architecture Festival (CAFx) offered a wide range of activities, from film screenings to exhibitions on the future of social housing. The festival's fourth edition took place over 11 days and featured more than 150 architectural events in Copenhagen, Aarhus, and Aalborg. Festival Director Josephine Michau explained that since its first edition, the intention behind CAFx was to bring many local agents together in order to build new dialogues around architecture. As a society, how do we identify with architecture? What values do we ascribe to it? These questions were part of this edition's overarching theme: "Architecture as identity."
© Kasper Nyobo © Kasper Nyobo
Arne Jacobsen's Aarhus City Hall. Image © Kasper Nyobo Arne Jacobsen's Aarhus City Hall. Image © Kasper Nyobo

Four main events marked the festival: the world premiere of ’BIG TIME’ - a new portrait film about architect Bjarke Ingels, a major international conference with visiting architects Charles Renfro and Barozzi Veiga, an exhibition titled

© Kasper Nyobo
Never Demolish exhibit. Image © Kasper Nyobo
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BIG Changes on the Horizon for Bjarke Ingels and His Firm

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“The greatest thing about being an architect,” pronounced Bjarke Ingels, “is that you build buildings.” The audience at the world premiere of the highly anticipated documentary film, BIG TIME, snickered at the seemingly obvious statement. But Ingels, ever the showman, explained himself: by building buildings, architects occupy the unique position of being able to add to the built environment the “most unlikely combinations,” which, ultimately, shape the world “just because [they] thought it.” He seems awed by the concept – the same awe portrayed in BIG TIME as the architect designs the skyscraper that will change New York City’s skyline. The Danish architect has previously been the subject of at least two other widely released documentaries: a film about the 8-House titled The Inifinite Happiness, and his own episode of Abstract, the Netflix series that looks into the lives of artists and creators.
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What can Latin America Learn From WOHA’s Green Skyscrapers?

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WOHA's first exhibition in Latin America, Garden City Mega City: WOHA's Urban Ecosystems presents over two decades of WOHA's international designs. With its inauguration at the Museum of the City of Mexico during the MEXTRÓPOLI International Festival of Architecture and City, the exhibition proposes the introduction of biodiversity and lively public spaces into vertical, climate-sensitive highrises within megalopolises. The exhibition features sixteen intricate architectural models, an immersive video installation and large-scale drawings and images that show WOHA's proposals for vertical communities in the tropical megacities. PLANE-SITE documented the exhibition's opening along with the points of view of various MEXTRÓPOLI contributors and city officials. In Latin America especially, the analysis of the similarities between megacities in Singapore and megacities in the western hemisphere can show Mexican architects new ways to explore the increasingly populated cities of the American continent. José María Espinosa, Director of the Museum of Mexico City, said,
Mexico is
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WOHA On Why High-Density Living Doesn’t Mean Sacrificing Nice Things

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As part of the MEXTRÓPOLI festival in Mexico City early last month, Singapore-based firm WOHA debuted their first exhibition in the Latin America, GARDEN CITY MEGA CITY. WOHA's architecture introduces biodiversity into public spaces, turning high-rise courtyards and hallways into teeming community assets. In this exhibition, the architects show how their work has addressed both climate change and the social challenges that occur as a result of rapid (upward) urban development.   We had the chance to speak with Wong Mun Summ y Richard Hassell − partners and founders of WOHA − so that they could tell us more about their practice and their intentions behind bringing the exhibition to Latin America. 
The things we are suggesting are maybe not terribly radical in some ways; it's simply how people have lived for centuries. But for some reason, people feel like when they want to live in a dense city they have to give
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