35HP by Joeb Moore & Partners

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/3s/3s26fh0cr9hu1v83.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />The renovation/addition of this Tudor style residence in Rye, New York links the home to its exterior by adding light filled program and circulation. While maximizing the habitable use of the site, the addition also responds to the key parameters of the existing home, preserving its&nbsp;character and history within the suburban neighborhood context.<br>
In order to create a symbiotic integration of the existing house and the new addition, we restored the original stucco and timber façade and added a new wood-clad entryway that offers a delicate and understated contrast to the neighborhood street. This new material appears again as the cladding for the more minimalist and abstract box addition that extends from the rear of the home. Its simple rectangular form both contrasts and compliments the original Tudor, post and beam gable structure. The addition is wrapped in a dark, charcoal-stained cedar skin, mimicking the colors found on the existing Continue reading "35HP by Joeb Moore & Partners"

Harbor Residence by Joeb Moore & Partners

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/jz/jzqgcmbx13lgek4g.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" />The Harbor Residence project undertook the transformation of an early 1980s waterfront &ldquo;transitional shingle style&rdquo; home situated on a site with 360-degree views of Greenwich Cove.&nbsp; The initial prompt and conceptual framework for the house came from the client who sought a design that would connect their growing collection of contemporary art with the house, interior and landscape in a way that would allow all three &ndash;&nbsp;art, architecture and landscape &ndash; to operate as an expanded and interactive field. &nbsp;The transformed interior and exterior spaces, flows, and views work to collapse the three into one.<br>
This “expanded field” is evident as one moves through the revised approach, transitioning from motor court, through a compressed privacy hedge grove that gives way to a vast pivoting entry, and into the double-height foyer gallery.  From there, views unfold panoramically through the house, across the landscaped infinity pool, and down to Long Continue reading "Harbor Residence by Joeb Moore & Partners"

Noyes Transformation by Joeb Moore & Partners Architects, LLC

The Noyes Transformation examines and extends the experimental tradition that emerged from the work of the “Harvard Five” in and around New Canaan, Connecticut during the 1950s. The group’s new model for open, modern single-family dwellings came to define residential design in the region, reflecting the cultural openness and dynamism of the community at large. The Brown Residence, originally designed by Eliot Noyes, is sited in this very context – beset, after decades of use, by a sense of decay – and in need of comprehensive rethinking. The key formal and spatial operations of the transformation focus ideas like repetition, contrast, and negotiation into a study of programmatic play that juxtaposes and connects old and new. Our redesign proposes the suspension of a simple, clean metallic container directly above the original one-story box (a loosely defined, 9-square grid plan, with subtractions) that mimics the dimensions and proportions of the original Continue reading "Noyes Transformation by Joeb Moore & Partners Architects, LLC"

Stonington Residence / Lincoln Residence by Joeb Moore & Partners Architects, LLC

The Stonington Residence is a recently renovated and restored historic house, sited on a small stone ledge between 300 feet of waterfront and a large meadow in Stonington, Connecticut. It’s original architect John Lincoln, former senior architect for the Navy at Quonset Point and professor of architecture at RISD, completed his design of the home during World War II, a time of accelerated development in materials and building technology. Lincoln’s commitment to innovative thinking and technology – as made evident by his early adoption of modern radiant heating techniques and his work with the institution that created the Quonset hut – was carried forward in the restoration. In referencing its architectural history, the restored building reuses elements from the material palette of existing house, while maintaining a decidedly innovative approach to material assembly and detailing. The original home had a granite wall running through its center; this wall remains as Continue reading "Stonington Residence / Lincoln Residence by Joeb Moore & Partners Architects, LLC"

Stonington / Lincoln Residence by Joeb Moore & Partners Architects, LLC

The Stonington Residence is a recently renovated and restored historic house, sited on a small stone ledge between 300 feet of waterfront and a large meadow in Stonington, Connecticut. It’s original architect John Lincoln, former senior architect for the Navy at Quonset Point and professor of architecture at RISD, completed his design of the home during World War II, a time of accelerated development in materials and building technology. Lincoln’s commitment to innovative thinking and technology – as made evident by his early adoption of modern radiant heating techniques and his work with the institution that created the Quonset hut – was carried forward in the restoration. In referencing its architectural history, the restored building reuses elements from the material palette of existing house, while maintaining a decidedly innovative approach to material assembly and detailing. The original home had a granite wall running through its center; this wall remains as Continue reading "Stonington / Lincoln Residence by Joeb Moore & Partners Architects, LLC"

44PL by Joeb Moore & Partners Architects, LLC

Located in the Greenwich, CT backcountry on four steeply sloped acres, the 44PL house uses a precise site and aesthetic strategy to comfortably satisfy a large residential program, while also triggering moments of surprise, play, and curiosity. This project is conceived as a series of concrete retaining walls and escarpments that traverse and cascade down the steeply sloped site. By deploying a series of straight walls to act as “jetties” into the landscape, the design manipulates the topography and invites it to cascade into the house. Hovering above and anchored to these concrete site walls is the house proper, a “primitive” conceived and constructed as a pair of smooth extruded volumes of differing lengths. Symbolically and strategically, the first of these extrusions presents a gable-front facade to the street and helps conceal the scale of the overall house beyond. The second rotates 90 degrees and runs parallel to the street Continue reading "44PL by Joeb Moore & Partners Architects, LLC"

Bridge House by Joeb Moore & Partners Architects, LLC

The Bridge House is located in Kent, Connecticut, along a 300' ridge that parallels the Housatonic River and Kent Falls State Park. The Kent Falls are a series of cascades formed when the bedrock containing alternating hard and soft layers eroded over time. The most striking experience of this dynamic ecological system is the gradual and cascading flow of rock and water as they slide down over time through the more stable and rooted surroundings of trees, plants, and earth. Our impression of the falls and the more recent historic covered bridges of the area inspired the conceptual design of the Bridge House. Translating and mirroring the slow geological flow of bedrock and the more active flows and streams of water above, we invented a strategy where the building becomes a bridge, springing out of the sloping topography. As the house takes on form and volume it turns and spans Continue reading "Bridge House by Joeb Moore & Partners Architects, LLC"

Spiral House by Joeb Moore & Partners Architects, LLC

Situated along the Connecticut shoreline of Long Island Sound, the Spiral House seeks to engage, reflect, and enhance the surrounding coastal climate and its atmospherics of light, air, and water. Formally and spatially, the house is a direct, pragmatic response to the strict environmental and local zoning regulations imposed on the building and its site. Conceptually, the house is the resultant form of an interface and tension between two systems of geometry - one projective, the other radial. Through an overlapping construct of spatial progression, growth, and interference, the socio-spatial roles of publicity and privacy; interior and exterior; house and landscape, are intimately connected and entwined, yet also left open-ended and indeterminate, much like the water itself. It is an architecture that operates precisely and creatively within the found and prescribed social and environmental boundaries of the place to produce a dynamic, experience-oriented dwelling. In all its detai...