The art of cost estimating and whispering

It’s going to cost what now? Have you ever played the telephone game? You know, that game where you whisper something into someone’s ear, and then they whisper it into the person beside them’s ear, and they whisper it to the next person, and so on until you get back to the original person? You’ll start with “please pass the ...

HGTV can kiss my ass

NO, it does not take 5 days for construction of a 1750 s.f. addition. Please stop telling people that. Sure, 5 days, if you adhere the cabinet doors with double stick tape in lieu of hinges. Just so they hang in place long enough to get that blurry “after” shot. Sure, it takes 5 days if you never show the ...

JOB POD!!!!

NEW FOR 2018! THE REDESIGNED JOBSITE TRAILER FOR THE MODERN CONTRACTOR INTRODUCING – THE JOB POD! It’s small and efficient. Lacking all detail (which was value engineered out of the design). Made of all glass and perforated metal! Well, at least it was designed that way conceptually, but it was executed in “no glass” ™ and chained link to save ...

Notes from my clients friends niece who is a designer

Hi Svehn, I just wanted to drop you a line to share some thoughts on the home addition you designed for us. My friend was in town this weekend for the azalea festival and she brought along her niece who just happens to be a designer. Maybe you’ve met her? Sarah S____? Lovely girl. So smart. Since she was here, I ...

Architects Valentines 2018

It’s almost that time of year again. That time to show one’s love for our significant other. The one who’s been by our side all these years. Our reason for getting up in the morning and missing deadlines. Of course, I’m referring to Architecture. I just Kahn’t resist valentine’s day or a good pun. So here’s a batch of my latest ...

State of the Architectural Umion

The architect walks slowly towards the podium, clad in black, waving, and smiling. crowd bursts into applause Good evening my fellow architects. I stand here before you all today to say, proudly, that the state of our architectural umion is strong. pauses for applause The economy has continued to climb, inexplicably, upwards, lifting all boats, and firms, and “ateliers” in its ...

Tips for Architectural Marketing

Try to write your firm descriptions in as esoteric language as possible. If the potential client doesn’t need to use a thesaurus at least once, you don’t need them anyway. Show your work, including some sketches from your undergraduate school days at RISD. Show only work that has won an award. Do not point out that the award was given to ...

Absence

Sometime in 2014 I just stopped writing. Actually, I started to fizzle out a few years before. I started to lose my focus I think. When I started this blog I was not in the best place. I had lost my job. I was floundering to find my way in a new economic climate. I was still idealistic about my ...

20 Things to do to it with the architecture

  1. Align it.
  2. Simplify it.
  3. Order it.
  4. Place it on axis with it.
  5. Remove the barrier between the interior and the exterior of it.
  6. Repeat it.
  7. Repeat it.
  8. Refer to that thing that someone else did to it sometime before in Norway, probably.
  9. Establish a datum line through it.
  10. Make a half-hearted and somewhat esoteric reference to the context in which it exists.
  11. Note the direction of the sun in relation to it.
  12. Put a sun shade on the south-facing elevation of it.
  13. Remind us of what Le Corbusier did to it, preferably while using the words “Brise Soleil”
  14. Paint it white.
  15. Explain it while using large words without sounding too condescending.
  16. Waterproof the hell out of it.
  17. Allow it’s roof to leak, because that’s what Frank Lloyd Wright would do.
  18. Remove all the furniture from it.
  19. Publish a photograph of what you did to it.
  20. Make it stand for something,
    Continue reading "20 Things to do to it with the architecture"

20 Things to do to it with the architecture

Align it. Simplify it. Order it. Place it on axis with it. Remove the barrier between the interior and the exterior of it. Repeat it. Repeat it. Refer to that thing that someone else did to it sometime before in Norway, probably. Establish a datum...

20 Things to do to it with the architecture

Align it. Simplify it. Order it. Place it on axis with it. Remove the barrier between the interior and the exterior of it. Repeat it. Repeat it. Refer to that thing that someone else did to it sometime before in Norway, probably. Establish a datum...

20 Things to do to it with the architecture

Align it. Simplify it. Order it. Place it on axis with it. Remove the barrier between the interior and the exterior of it. Repeat it. Repeat it. Refer to that thing that someone else did to it sometime before in Norway, probably. Establish a datum...

20 Things to do to it with the architecture

Align it. Simplify it. Order it. Place it on axis with it. Remove the barrier between the interior and the exterior of it. Repeat it. Repeat it. Refer to that thing that someone else did to it sometime before in Norway, probably. Establish a datum...

20 Things to do to it with the architecture

Align it. Simplify it. Order it. Place it on axis with it. Remove the barrier between the interior and the exterior of it. Repeat it. Repeat it. Refer to that thing that someone else did to it sometime before in Norway, probably. Establish a datum...

20 Things to do to it with the architecture

  1. Align it.
  2. Simplify it.
  3. Order it.
  4. Place it on axis with it.
  5. Remove the barrier between the interior and the exterior of it.
  6. Repeat it.
  7. Repeat it.
  8. Refer to that thing that someone else did to it sometime before in Norway, probably.
  9. Establish a datum line through it.
  10. Make a half-hearted and somewhat esoteric reference to the context in which it exists.
  11. Note the direction of the sun in relation to it.
  12. Put a sun shade on the south-facing elevation of it.
  13. Remind us of what Le Corbusier did to it, preferably while using the words “Brise Soleil”
  14. Paint it white.
  15. Explain it while using large words without sounding too condescending.
  16. Waterproof the hell out of it.
  17. Allow it’s roof to leak, because that’s what Frank Lloyd Wright would do.
  18. Remove all the furniture from it.
  19. Publish a photograph of what you did to it.
  20. Make it stand for something, It doesn’t really matter what, just something… anything
  Model of Villa Shondan designed by Le Corbusier – HERE

How many architects does it take to screw in a lightbulb?

How many architects does it take to screw in a lightbulb? Louis-Poulsen-Artichoke  
  1. Apparently the answer is 21.
 
One to sketch out the concept;
One to model it in Revit;
One to question the concept… “Does it have to screw?”;
One to write an addendum informing the contractors;
One to find the spec section and ASTM standards for screwability;
One to fill out the LEED paperwork for said lightbulb;
One to suggest a “stainless steel” lightbulb;
One to suggest a skylight instead of the lightbulb;
One to research alternate methods of screwing on the internet (Don’t google that while in the office);
One to suggest having a charette to brainstorm ideas about screwing in lightbulbs;
One (intern) to build a chipboard model of the lghtbulb;
One to suggest recessing the lightbulb;
One to issue addendum # 35 to have the contractor reverse the swing on the door in the room so the light switch for the lightbulb can be relocated to the other wall;
One to ask the design principal in charge to call the client to let them know we’re screwed;
One to call the structural engineer to see if the beam running through the lightbulb can be moved;
One to render the space showing a Louis Poulsen “artichoke” lamp instead of the lightbulb;
One to ask: “what the lightbulb wants to be?”;
One to discuss Le Corbusier’s use of lightbulbs throughout Villa Savoye;
One to google “Snohetta / lightbulbs”;
One to remove the boundary between the interior and the exterior of the lightbulb;
 

And finally;

 
One turn off the light while muttering “less is more…”
lightbulb    

Not in my neighborhood

8699927229_7c796c095d_b  The following is an excerpt from my neighborhood list serve:   …………………… From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ‘CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>
Sent: Wednesday, April 16, 2014 1:05 PM
Subject: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Modern Home,

l realize that your home design across the street from me may be a commentary on the current state of the social economic environment we find ourselves in at the beginning of the 21st Century; however, I feel a more historic facade would be in keeping with the character of this neighborhood. After all, one does not need to abandoned the lessons of the past in order to live in the present. The home I live in is historically charming, and still has all the comforts of the modern world. I even have a satellite dish (placed on the rear of the home of course). Obviously, modern conveniences do not need to conflict with an historic sensibility. Yet, your home has no charm at all. Your facade seems to scowl at me. Perhaps you could add more detail? I googled “brackets” and was surprised by the quantity of decorative eave options available. I would also recommend perusing the latest issues of Martha Stewart’s “Home” magazine. Granted, her design style is regionally specific to the upper middle class, but still, there is real value therein. I particularly enjoyed the recipes featuring pumpkin seeds. Perhaps you could incorporate some of her ideas into your design? And, of course, shutters are always an attractive addition to any home. What are you trying to prove with all that glass anyway?

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’Dwell’ <info[at]dwellmag[dot]com>
Sent: Wednesday, April 16, 2014 7:15 PM
Subject: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Traditional Home,

I am not trying to prove anything. I am simply living in the “here and now.” Not everything in the past bears repeating. My grandfather was an alcoholic.

…………………… From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ’CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>
Sent: Wednesday, April 16, 2014 8:24 PM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Modern Home,

I’m sorry to hear about your grandfather. But, keep in mind that “those who ignore the past are destined to repeat it.” Also, I think you have too much glass on your house. I can see things inside.

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’Dwell’ <info[at]dwellmag[dot]com>
Sent: Wednesday, April 16, 2014 9:11 PM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Traditional Home,

Are you implying that modernism causes substance abuse? Granted, you may have a point. But, I would ask that you refrain from looking into my private spaces. What I choose to do in my own living room is between me and my cats. You have no right to judge me. As a precaution, I’ve ordered custom retractable shades for all the windows that face your house. The shades are being shipped from Milan and should arrive in less than a year. In the meantime, I’ve installed a large portrait of Charles Eames in the front window. Do not look at it.

……………………   From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ’CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>
Sent: Thursday, April 17, 2014 7:51 AM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Modern Home,

I’ve spent some time studying the local sign ordinances and feel certain that the large portrait you have installed on the facade of your non-contextual dwelling is in violation of the zoning regulations. Please remove the “sign” immediately.

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’Dwell’ <info[at]dwellmag[dot]com>
Sent: Friday, April 18, 2014 10:43 AM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Traditional Home,

Per your request, I have removed the portrait of Charles Eames. In its place, I have displayed an enlarged photograph of Victorian scroll-work that was typically installed along the eaves of front porches in homes of your style. I have drawn a large question mark on the photograph, subtly raising a question: “Why was this part of the historic character of your home omitted, and by whom?”

……………………   From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ’CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>
Sent: Friday, April 18, 2014 10:44 AM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Modern Home,

I do not appreciate this assault on my good name. I have done everything within my means to faithfully recreate this home in keeping with the charms of a by-gone era. And, I have aspired to become a valued member of this prestigious neighborhood. Perhaps you should consider doing the same. How dare you belittle my character, and the character of this neighborhood with your flat roofs and your vacant stares.

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’Dwell’ <info[at]dwellmag[dot]com>
Sent: Friday, April 18, 2014 1:09 PM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Traditional Home,

I think you’ve confused my vacant stare with a complete lack of appreciation for your colonial way of life. In the future, please consider parking your carriage in the rear of your homestead, near the smokehouse, or the pigsty. And, stop looking into my bathroom windows. 

……………………   From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ’CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>: ’WilsonWilsonWilson&Wilsonpllc’ <MrWilson[at]expensivesuits[dot]com>
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 11:28 PM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Mr. “so-called” Modern Home,

I, and my lawyers, have filed a motion to appeal the construction of your home based on numerous violations of the neighborhood appearance guidelines that I have recently begun drafting. Please cease all construction activities immediately.

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’Dwell’ <info[at]dwellmag[dot]com>
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 11:46 PM
Subject: Re: Suggestions for you to screw off

Traditional Home,

Screw you. I will cease nothing. Construction on this home was completed 6 years ago. In fact, I reviewed the county records, and my home was completed 3 years prior to yours. You are blocking MY view. Please move your “home” to the left.

……………………   From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ’CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 11:47 PM
Subject: Re: Suggestions for you to go to hell

Modern Home,

I will not move. Furthermore, this modernist aggression against my way of life will not stand. It will not stand, I say.

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’Dwell’ <info[at]dwellmag[dot]com>
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 11:49 PM
Subject: Re: the burning of Atlanta

“Traditional” Home,

Jesus, Scarlett, have an iced tea. You sound like you’re having the vapors. Perhaps you should rest a spell on your porch and fan yourself. You seem pale; a pale representation of a far, far better place.

……………………   From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ’CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 11:51 PM
Subject: Re: DO NOT EMAIL ME AGAIN

Modern “Home“,

You sir, are a monster.

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’AMC’ <iloveoldmovies[at]AMCtv[dot]com>
Sent: Sunday, April 20, 2014 6:55 AM
Subject: Re: Re: DO NOT EMAIL ME AGAIN EITHER (dickweed)

Dear Ms. O’Hara,

Stop staring at me.

……………………     CREDITS: This post has been dedicated to the good fight - Hang in there @ModernOakwood. The photo used in this post is from Ian Sane‘s photostream on Flickr and has been used under the creative commons license –  the original image can be found HERE
 

Not in my neighborhood

8699927229_7c796c095d_b  The following is an excerpt from my neighborhood list serve:   …………………… From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ‘CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>
Sent: Wednesday, April 16, 2014 1:05 PM
Subject: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Modern Home,

l realize that your home design across the street from me may be a commentary on the current state of the social economic environment we find ourselves in at the beginning of the 21st Century; however, I feel a more historic facade would be in keeping with the character of this neighborhood. After all, one does not need to abandoned the lessons of the past in order to live in the present. The home I live in is historically charming, and still has all the comforts of the modern world. I even have a satellite dish (placed on the rear of the home of course). Obviously, modern conveniences do not need to conflict with an historic sensibility. Yet, your home has no charm at all. Your facade seems to scowl at me. Perhaps you could add more detail? I googled “brackets” and was surprised by the quantity of decorative eave options available. I would also recommend perusing the latest issues of Martha Stewart’s “Home” magazine. Granted, her design style is regionally specific to the upper middle class, but still, there is real value therein. I particularly enjoyed the recipes featuring pumpkin seeds. Perhaps you could incorporate some of her ideas into your design? And, of course, shutters are always an attractive addition to any home. What are you trying to prove with all that glass anyway?

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’Dwell’ <info[at]dwellmag[dot]com>
Sent: Wednesday, April 16, 2014 7:15 PM
Subject: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Traditional Home,

I am not trying to prove anything. I am simply living in the “here and now.” Not everything in the past bears repeating. My grandfather was an alcoholic.

…………………… From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ’CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>
Sent: Wednesday, April 16, 2014 8:24 PM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Modern Home,

I’m sorry to hear about your grandfather. But, keep in mind that “those who ignore the past are destined to repeat it.” Also, I think you have too much glass on your house. I can see things inside.

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’Dwell’ <info[at]dwellmag[dot]com>
Sent: Wednesday, April 16, 2014 9:11 PM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Traditional Home,

Are you implying that modernism causes substance abuse? Granted, you may have a point. But, I would ask that you refrain from looking into my private spaces. What I choose to do in my own living room is between me and my cats. You have no right to judge me. As a precaution, I’ve ordered custom retractable shades for all the windows that face your house. The shades are being shipped from Milan and should arrive in less than a year. In the meantime, I’ve installed a large portrait of Charles Eames in the front window. Do not look at it.

……………………   From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ’CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>
Sent: Thursday, April 17, 2014 7:51 AM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Modern Home,

I’ve spent some time studying the local sign ordinances and feel certain that the large portrait you have installed on the facade of your non-contextual dwelling is in violation of the zoning regulations. Please remove the “sign” immediately.

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’Dwell’ <info[at]dwellmag[dot]com>
Sent: Friday, April 18, 2014 10:43 AM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Traditional Home,

Per your request, I have removed the portrait of Charles Eames. In its place, I have displayed an enlarged photograph of Victorian scroll-work that was typically installed along the eaves of front porches in homes of your style. I have drawn a large question mark on the photograph, subtly raising a question: “Why was this part of the historic character of your home omitted, and by whom?”

……………………   From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ’CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>
Sent: Friday, April 18, 2014 10:44 AM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Modern Home,

I do not appreciate this assault on my good name. I have done everything within my means to faithfully recreate this home in keeping with the charms of a by-gone era. And, I have aspired to become a valued member of this prestigious neighborhood. Perhaps you should consider doing the same. How dare you belittle my character, and the character of this neighborhood with your flat roofs and your vacant stares.

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’Dwell’ <info[at]dwellmag[dot]com>
Sent: Friday, April 18, 2014 1:09 PM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Dear Traditional Home,

I think you’ve confused my vacant stare with a complete lack of appreciation for your colonial way of life. In the future, please consider parking your carriage in the rear of your homestead, near the smokehouse, or the pigsty. And, stop looking into my bathroom windows. 

……………………   From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ’CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>: ’WilsonWilsonWilson&Wilsonpllc’ <MrWilson[at]expensivesuits[dot]com>
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 11:28 PM
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Suggestions for your facade

Mr. “so-called” Modern Home,

I, and my lawyers, have filed a motion to appeal the construction of your home based on numerous violations of the neighborhood appearance guidelines that I have recently begun drafting. Please cease all construction activities immediately.

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’Dwell’ <info[at]dwellmag[dot]com>
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 11:46 PM
Subject: Re: Suggestions for you to screw off

Traditional Home,

Screw you. I will cease nothing. Construction on this home was completed 6 years ago. In fact, I reviewed the county records, and my home was completed 3 years prior to yours. You are blocking MY view. Please move your “home” to the left.

……………………   From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ’CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 11:47 PM
Subject: Re: Suggestions for you to go to hell

Modern Home,

I will not move. Furthermore, this modernist aggression against my way of life will not stand. It will not stand, I say.

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’Dwell’ <info[at]dwellmag[dot]com>
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 11:49 PM
Subject: Re: the burning of Atlanta

“Traditional” Home,

Jesus, Scarlett, have an iced tea. You sound like you’re having the vapors. Perhaps you should rest a spell on your porch and fan yourself. You seem pale; a pale representation of a far, far better place.

……………………   From: Traditional Home <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
To: Modern House <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
Cc: ’CityHall’ <info[at]nimby[dot]gov>
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 11:51 PM
Subject: Re: DO NOT EMAIL ME AGAIN

Modern “Home“,

You sir, are a monster.

……………………   From: Modern Home <xxxxxxx[at]squarespace[dot]com>
To: Traditional House <xxxxxxx[at]aol[dot]com>
Cc: ’AMC’ <iloveoldmovies[at]AMCtv[dot]com>
Sent: Sunday, April 20, 2014 6:55 AM
Subject: Re: Re: DO NOT EMAIL ME AGAIN EITHER (dickweed)

Dear Ms. O’Hara,

Stop staring at me.

……………………     CREDITS: This post has been dedicated to the good fight - Hang in there @ModernOakwood. The photo used in this post is from Ian Sane‘s photostream on Flickr and has been used under the creative commons license –  the original image can be found HERE
 

Sketches of Venice

I went to Venice, Italy last week and took along my sketchbook. These sketches were all done quickly, mainly because I was usually leaning against a wall, being bumped by swarms of passing tourists. I haven’t sketched from real life like this in a while, and I was surprised by how it changed the way I looked at the city. Maybe taking a few minutes to sketch down what you see has a way of burning the image into your memory. At least I hope so. So, here’s 28 of the sketches I did over a 3 day period. Some of them are terrible, a few of them are good (I’ll let you decided which are which), but I hope all of them helped me form a better connection with this incredible place. .
sketch-1

1 (3-30-14)

sketch-2

2 (3-30-14)

sketch-3

3 (3-30-14)

sketch-4

4 (3-30-14)

sketch-5

5 (3-30-14)

sketch-6

6 (3-30-14)

sketch-7

7 (3-30-14)

sketch-8

8 (3-30-14)

sketch-9

9 (3-31-14)

sketch-10

10 (3-31-14)

sketch-11

11 (3-31-14)

sketch-12

12 (3-31-14)

sketch-13

13 (3-31-14)

sketch-14

14 (3-31-14)

sketch-15

15 (3-31-14)

sketch-16

16 (3-31-14)

sketch-17

17 (3-31-14)

sketch-18

18 (3-31-14)

sketch-19

19 (3-31-14)

sketch-20

20 (3-31-14)

sketch-21

21 (4-1-14)

sketch-22

22 (4-1-14)

sketch-23

23 (4-1-14)

sketch-24

24 (4-1-14)

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On Designing Evil Lairs

This article, by Jody Brown, originally appeared on Coffee with an Architect as “Evil Lairs.” New plan. From now on I will ONLY design evil lairs. Because all the best architecture is designed for the evil. My work will have moats, and concrete, and glass and steel. I will design 16-story one-bedroom homes, with helipads, and lots of electronics. There will be a retractable roof, maybe lasers. I will completely ignore the building code, because you know “evil”. Building codes are for the common people. Not for the evil. The stairs will have no railings. None. Screw OSHA. Falling from the stair into the reflecting pool is just my way of thinning out the weak. The risers will be open too. Watch your shins. There will be an improbable cantilever, probably over the side of a cliff. My enemies will dangle there while I stand on their fingers and laugh maniacally. The rock below will be jagged and unforgiving. You could scream of course, but obviously this lair will be remote. No one is going to hear you. Oh, was there a 42″ guard rail next to the cliff edge? Of course there wasn’t. The lair will be clad in reflective glass, arranged in a precise semi-circle. At exactly 12:45 on the summer equinox, this form will focus the sun’s rays and intensify them, melting you and your passing Jaguar XJR. Somewhere in Uruaguay, Rafael Vinoly will receive a call on a burner cell. “it’s done” I will say. My lair will dissolve the separation between the inside and the outside, by using acid. The view from my lair will be breath-taking. Literally. It will be vast, open, and sparingly furnished. And grossly over budget. It will be financed out of several Swiss bank accounts from various shell companies. The real money will be coming from the cartel. I will write “glazing” in the memo section of all of the checks. The off-shore banks will know what this means. There will be a large safe in the master closet, covered by a rare Mondrian print. Within the safe will be a leather case with $250,000, a pistol, and a black and white photograph of Le Corbusier, naked, with a large scar on his leg. I will live here alone. The design of the lair will be featured on the cover of the August 2014 issue of Architecture magazine. Daniel Libeskind will see this, then slowly rise and move towards the master closet. He will remove the Mondrian print, and open the safe. Inside the safe will be a small remote control with a flashing red button. Libeskind will press the button, with the slightest hint of a smile crossing his face. And it will begin. Jody Brown, Leed AP is an architect, proud Dad, loving husband, awesome cook, coffee and wine snob, old-time banjo player, ukulele and piano player wanna-be, constant drawer, and sometime painter. He’s also the brain behind Coffee with an Architect and Jody Brown Architecture. Follow him @JodyBrownArch Haven’t got enough “evil” design? Check out: