Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

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Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. Each of the previous eighteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 18th Pavilion, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public.  The premise behind the creation of the pavilions is simple: an architect who has not built in the UK is given the opportunity to showcase their talents and hopefully gain exposure. They are invited to build a temporary pavilion on the grounds of the
Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Helene Binet
Serpentine Pavilion 2001. Image © Helene Binet
Serpentine Pavilion 2002. Image © Sylvain Deleu
Serpentine Pavilion 2002. Image © Sylvain Deleu
Serpentine Pavilion 2003. Image © Sylvain Deleu
Serpentine Pavilion 2004 (unbuilt). Image Courtesy of MVRDV
Serpentine Pavilion 2005. Image © Sylvain Deleu
Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach
Serpentine Pavilion 2007. Image © Luke Hayes
Serpentine Pavilion 2008. Image © John Offenbach
Serpentine Pavilion 2009. Image © Claire Byrne
Serpentine Pavilion 2010. Image © John Offenbach
Serpentine Pavilion 2011. Image © John Offenbach
Serpentine Pavilion 2012. Image © Iwan Baan
Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Iwan Baan
Serpentine Pavilion 2014. Image © George Rex
Serpentine Pavilion 2014. Image © George Rex
Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © NAARO
Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © Iwan Baan
Serpentine Pavilion 2016. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Serpentine Pavilion 2017. Image © Iwan Baan
Serpentine Pavilion 2018. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Continue reading "Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years"

Spotlight: Shigeru Ban

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Aspen Art Museum. Image © Michael Moran Aspen Art Museum. Image © Michael Moran Shigeru Ban (born August 5th 1957) is a Japanese architect who won the 2014 Pritzker Prize for his significant contributions in architectural innovation and philanthropy. His ability to re-apply conventional knowledge in differing contexts has resulted in a breadth of work that is characterized by structural sophistication and unconventional techniques and materials. Ban has used these innovations not only to create beautiful architecture but as a tool to help those in need, by creating fast, economical, and sustainable housing solutions for the homeless and the displaced. As the Pritzker jury cites: “Shigeru Ban is a tireless architect whose work exudes optimism.”
Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects Courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects

Born in Tokyo to a businessman father who enjoyed classical music, and a mother who designed haute couture clothing, Ban was exposed to a creative environment. He grew up in a Japanese wooden house that was often

Aspen Art Museum. Image © Michael Moran
Nomadic Museum, Santa Monica. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/paolomazzoleni/248929123'>Flickr user paolomazzoleni</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Curtain Wall House. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai
Tamedia Office Building. Image © Didier Boy de la Tour
Centre Pompidou Metz. Image © Didier Boy de la Tour
Continue reading "Spotlight: Shigeru Ban"

25 Architecture Instagram Feeds to Follow Now (Part IV)

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 ArchDaily just reached 1 million followers on Instagram! To celebrate, we’re featuring 25 new Instagram feeds to follow. As with parts one, two and three of our Instagram round-up, we’ve selected a varied group of accounts which includes architecture photographers like Laurian Ghinitoiu, whose stunning images have appeared on ArchDaily countless times, and prominent architecture firms like Mad Architects, MVRDV, Sou Fujimoto and OMA. We’ve also added well-curated feeds on certain subjects like socialist_modernism, and perfectly symmetrical buildings via symmetrical_monsters which are sure to inspire you. If you’re looking for daily inspiration, these feeds are definite must-follows. 1. @nukeproofsuit
2. @laurianghinitoiu

The War Over Water: This Dystopian City Design Was Inspired by Current Trends in Resource Extraction

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It’s the year 2036 in Generic City, a gloomy place where once mighty skyscrapers are lucky to be in decrepit condition, if they haven’t already been swallowed by the ever-increasing number of sinkholes appearing throughout the city. But the city is not lifeless: a constant hum echoes about the city, a well-choreographed churning motion in pursuit of one central activity. In this city, the world’s most precious commodity—not gold, not diamonds, not even black gold but just simple, fresh water is under the total control of a mega-corporation named Turquoise. The people are ruled by an oppressive autocracy and life is divided between the haves and have-nots. Life revolves around access to water. Is this the opening paragraph of the latest dystopian novel? No, but it might be Joshua Dawson’s interpretation of our troubling future. With CÁUSTICO, an ode to the growing tradition of “speculative design fiction” pioneered by countercultural avant-gardists of the 1960s
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Courtesy of Joshua Dawson
Continue reading "The War Over Water: This Dystopian City Design Was Inspired by Current Trends in Resource Extraction"

Marwa Al-Sabouni Explains How Syrian Architecture Laid the Foundations for War

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In 2014, Syrian architect Marwa al-Sabouni won the Syria category of the UN Habitat Mass Housing Competition for a housing scheme she developed for the city of Homs, her hometown. Now over two years later, Thames and Hudson has published her book Battle for Home: The Vision of a Young Architect in Syria. Throughout all of these events, al-Sabouni has remained in Syria. As the Guardian puts it: “As bombs fell around her, Syrian architect Marwa al-Sabouni stayed in Homs throughout the civil war, making plans to build hope from carnage.” In this TEDSummit video, Al-Sabouni argues “that while architecture is not the axis around which all of human life rotates... it has the power to... direct human activity” She believes that the Old Islamic cities of Syria were once harmonious urban entities which advocated for co-habitation and tolerance through their intertwining. However, she posits that over the last
The Destruction of Homs, Syria. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Destruction_in_Homs_(4).jpg'>Wikimedia Commons user Bo Yaser</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
View of Homs in 2010. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/zz77/5246616267'>Flickr user zz77</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
Marwa Al-Sabouni's proposal for Baba Amr. Image Courtesy of Render (Marwa Al-Sabouni & Khaled Komee)
Marwa Al-Sabouni's proposal for Baba Amr. Image Courtesy of Render (Marwa Al-Sabouni & Khaled Komee)
Marwa Al-Sabouni's proposal for Baba Amr. Image Courtesy of Render (Marwa Al-Sabouni & Khaled Komee)
Continue reading "Marwa Al-Sabouni Explains How Syrian Architecture Laid the Foundations for War"

How to Ensure that Your Online Architecture Portfolio is On Point

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Why should I even have an online portfolio?

A portion of working in architecture includes having to market yourself and your skills. "One minute networking" is a skill that many architects learn in order to be successful in the creative field, but having the gift of gab requires you to put your money where your mouth is. If you have an online portfolio which is accessible with just an internet internet connection and a digital device capable of viewing it, your work is always conveniently available during your networking conversations. It's also helpful for sharing your work in online conversations: while a pdf of your print portfolio can really only be sent by email, practically every messaging app or direct messaging service built into social networks will allow you to send a link, allowing you to take advantage of an opportunity even when you weren't expecting one to arise. Finally,

<a href='https://www.behance.net/'>Behance</a>
<a href='https://www.squarespace.com/'>Squarespace</a>
<a href='https://format.com/'>Format</a>
<a href='https://wordpress.com/'>Wordpress</a>
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4 Ways You Can Dress Like an Architect

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 1. All black.
2. Black with a bit of grey.
3. Black with a bit of white.
4. Match different shades of black. 
Done. Go home. All jokes aside, there has never been a set uniform in the architecture profession. The truth is, there are a large variety of different architectural practices, and one’s attire to do architectural work often depends on each firm’s unique culture. There are corporate firms composed of hundreds of people in office blocks where “corporate” clothing is expected, or there are atelier style firms where jeans and a simple shirt are more appropriate for the design-build. The architecture world is unique in that we are expected to be creative like artists, execute like engineers, negotiate like businessmen, and make like craftsmen but at the same time are asked to discover our own unique style and approach. Hybridity and improvisation abounds in architecture, which is
Vintage Festival Shirt via ASOS
mac shirt via COS
Bjarke Ingels "Yes is More" Tee via Cafe Press
Textured Gray Suit via ZARA
© Steve Double
© Sophie Mutevelian
Belted Shawl Coat via COS
Standard Black Crew Neck Tee via Uniqlo
Assymetrical Dress via COS
Black Gucci Horsebit Loafers via Mr. Porter
mac shirt via COS
© Takashi Okamoto
© Andrew Zuckermann / RSHP
Metallic Adidas x Raf Simons Stan Smiths via High Snobiety
Vintage Festival Shirt via ASOS
Crinkled Print Skirt via COS
Floral Poplin Shirt via ZARA
Paul Smith Floral Trousers via Mr. Porter
SHoP Architects
Le Corbusier with Albert Einstein
Olive Green Briefcase via ZARA
Textured Gray Suit via ZARA
Hatch Cream Blazer via Net-A-Porter
Paul Smith Floral Trousers via Mr. Porter
Paul Smith Double Breasted Blazer via Mr. Porter
Navy Blue Palazzo Trousers via ASOS
via Inhabitat
ArchDaily Tee
Oscar Niemeyer for Converse via The Guardian
Patched Blazer via ZARA
Bjarke Ingels "Yes is More" Tee via Cafe Press
Straight Cut Medium Wash Jeans via Old Navy
Straight Cut Khaki Trousers via Old Navy
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All The Architecture To See in Rio de Janeiro During the 2016 Olympics

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Image created using original image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/over_kind_man/3184875811/'>Flickr user over_kind_man</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Image created using original image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/over_kind_man/3184875811/'>Flickr user over_kind_man</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Rio de Janeiro is a city of sights and sounds. As diverse as its people is the collection of impressive architecture found in Brazil’s second most populous city—from Eurocentric historical architecture to 20th century regionalist modern marvels, not to mention the city’s growing crop of contemporary cultural venues. The combination of mountainous terrain, lush rainforest, and the ocean inspires many to create lively and unique architecture. In preparation for the 2016 Summer Olympics, the city has enlisted a crop of internationally renowned architects including Santiago Calatrava, whose work joins Rio's existing masterpieces from architects such as Oscar Niemeyer. But apart from its "Capital A" Architecture, the city of Rio is home to thousands of residents living in the now-famous favelas—interesting subjects of inquiry for those interested in the concept of spontaneous
Santa Marta. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/armandolobos/5920954662/'>Flickr user alobos Life</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
Cidade das Artes. Image © Nelson Kon
Metropolitan Cathedral of Saint Sebastian. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincentraal/9136698555/in/photolist-eVo64M-eVo3gR-eVnYar'>Flickr user vincentraal</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Museum of Tomorrow. Image © Bernard Lessa
Rio Municipal Theater. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/gameoflight/13084341645/in/photolist-kWfhuy-kWdM16-kWdEVk-kWfo5b'>Flickr user gameoflight</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-SA 2.0</a>
Niterói Contemporary Art Museum. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/gameoflight/13034234305'>Flickr user gameoflight</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-SA 2.0</a>
Maracanã Stadium. Image © Schlaich Bergermann und partner
Parque Lage. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/93906643@N08/8552874061/in/dateposted/'>Flickr user Jonas Santin</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/>CC BY-NC 2.0</a>
Museu de Arte Moderna. ImageImage © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MAM_-_Museu_de_Arte_Moderna_do_Rio_de_Janeiro_02.jpg'>Wikimedia user Halley Pacheco de Oliveira</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Museum of Tomorrow. Image © Bernard Lessa
Cidade das Artes. Image © Nelson Kon
MIS Copacabana. Image © Marcelo Horn / GOVERJ
Niterói Contemporary Art Museum. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/gameoflight/13034234305'>Flickr user gameoflight</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-SA 2.0</a>
Metropolitan Cathedral of Saint Sebastian. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincentraal/9136698555/in/photolist-eVo64M-eVo3gR-eVnYar'>Flickr user vincentraal</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Ministry of Health and Education Building. ImageImage public domain via Wikimedia
Museu de Arte Moderna. ImageImage © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MAM_-_Museu_de_Arte_Moderna_do_Rio_de_Janeiro_02.jpg'>Wikimedia user Halley Pacheco de Oliveira</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Parque Eduardo Guinle. Image © Nelson Kon
Royal Portugese Cabinet of Reading. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/gameoflight/13147949963'>Flickr user gameoflight</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-SA 2.0</a>
Rio Municipal Theater. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/gameoflight/13084341645/in/photolist-kWfhuy-kWdM16-kWdEVk-kWfo5b'>Flickr user gameoflight</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-SA 2.0</a>
Parque Lage. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/93906643@N08/8552874061/in/dateposted/'>Flickr user Jonas Santin</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/>CC BY-NC 2.0</a>
Old Cathedral of Rio. ImageImage © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Igreja_de_Nossa_Senhora_do_Carmo_da_Antiga_S%C3%A9_-_Interior_02.jpg'>Wikimedia user Halley Pacheco de Oliveira</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a>
Santa Marta. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/armandolobos/5920954662/'>Flickr user alobos Life</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
Teleferico do Complexo do Alemão. ImageImage © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/pacgov/5974151055'>Flickr user pacgov</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
Rio Art Museum. Image © Leonardo Finotti
Uruguai Station. Image © Nelson Kon
Homeless World Cup Legacy Center. Image Courtesy of Architecture for Humanity
Capela Joá. Image © Tuca Reines
Maracanã Stadium. Image © Schlaich Bergermann und partner
Continue reading "All The Architecture To See in Rio de Janeiro During the 2016 Olympics"

Marlon Blackwell On Working in Arkansas and Why We Should “Recreate Strangeness” in Architecture

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In this video entitled Building Between, Marlon Blackwell advocates for a kind of regionalism which isn’t as divisive as “regionalism.” As a 24-year resident of Arkansas, he recalls his work and process in a place which he states is both “an environment of natural beauty and a place of real constructed ugliness”—showing the nuanced and self-critical awareness of place beyond the utopian glorification of genius loci which earlier this year earned him the 2016 Cooper Hewitt National Design Award in Architecture. < p class="minis"> Srygley Office Building. Image © Timothy Hursley Vol Walker Hall & the Steven L Anderson Design Center. Image © Timothy Hursley Fayetteville Montessori Elementary School. Image © Timothy Hursley St Nicholas Church. Image Courtesy of Marlon Blackwell Architects
Most architecture isn’t very good, and most good architecture is good enough for most days, but there is some architecture which should rise above the everyday.

In their often maligned context in Middle America, Blackwell’s projects inject life and cultural vitality, with the most notable examples being the St. Nicholas Church and the Fayetteville Montessori Elementary school. These works reflect his opinion that “architecture can happen anywhere, in any

Continue reading "Marlon Blackwell On Working in Arkansas and Why We Should “Recreate Strangeness” in Architecture"

Margot Krasojevic Proposes Trolleybus Garden that Generates Electricity From the Movement of Vehicles

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© Margot Krasojević © Margot Krasojević Far from the common dismissal of Margot Krasojevic’s work as (in her own words) “parametric futurist crap,” her work has always revolved around concepts of sustainability. As she explained to ArchDaily last year, she aims to focus on the ways that sustainable technology “will affect not just an architectural language but create a cross disciplinary dialogue and superimpose a typology in light of the ever-evolving technological era.” For the second project in a series of three proposals for the city of Belgrade Serbia, the architect is proposing a “Trolleybus Garden” that functions as a waiting shelter and park while simultaneously harnessing kinetic movement to produce electricity.

© Margot Krasojević © Margot Krasojević © Margot Krasojević © Margot Krasojević

© Margot Krasojević © Margot Krasojević
Contrary to the immediate speculation of many, Krasojevic’s projects are not just media-friendly photo-based assemblages. They are founded on more tangible research, data, and inspiration. For this proposal, the architect looked at the city’s pre-existing trolleybus network. In lieu
© Margot Krasojević
© Margot Krasojević
© Margot Krasojević
© Margot Krasojević
© Margot Krasojević
© Margot Krasojević
Continue reading "Margot Krasojevic Proposes Trolleybus Garden that Generates Electricity From the Movement of Vehicles"

26 Things All Architects Can Relate To

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© hvostik via Shutterstock © hvostik via Shutterstock Working in architecture is always a challenging experience in which you just never know what might happen next. That said, there are a number of things we can collectively relate to as a part of this industry. Here we've created a list of things we're all too familiar with—whether that relates to finishing projects, working with clients, or just dealing with people that totally don't even know what goes on in architecture. Which ones did we miss? 1. Sometimes, there's nothing quite as relaxing as putting on your headphones, listening to your favorite music, and working on a drawing or model.
© Ramin Hasanalizade via Shutterstock © Ramin Hasanalizade via Shutterstock

2. That geeky, incredible feeling of traveling to see a building you've always wanted to see. 3. Still qualifying for student discounts on software. 4. When you’re sure that your model is about to break from too much handling but the professor/client insists on

© racorn via Shutterstock
© Visual Generation via Shutterstock
© fatmawati achmad zaenuri via Shutterstock
© Dmitry Guzhanin via Shutterstock
© Jiw Ingka via Shutterstock
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Reinier de Graaf Discusses Moscow’s Development and the “Major Stupidity” of Brexit

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At the recently concluded Moscow Urban Forum, Renier de Graaf shared his opinion on a range of topics, from UK’s Brexit and the EU identity to OMA’s work in Russia, particularly in shaping the recent growth of Moscow. De Graaf is a partner at OMA and as director of the firm’s Think Tank, AMO, he produced The Image of Europe, an exhibition hoping to portray a “bold, explicit and popular” European Union. Thus, it comes as no surprise that de Graaf, along with Rem Koolhaas, is particularly outspoken about the recent events within the European Union. Beginning in 2001 with the firm's Barcode Flag for the EU, AMO has closely associated itself with developing the identity and iconography of the European Union. In a previous interview, De Graaf discussed how research and media become vessels for political agendas. AMO’s work with the EU, which includes the "Atlas
Continue reading "Reinier de Graaf Discusses Moscow’s Development and the “Major Stupidity” of Brexit"

A Tiny Luxury: What are “Tiny Houses” Really Saying About Architecture?

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© Roderick Aichinger © Roderick Aichinger

Following a successful pilot launch in Boston and $1 million in venture backing, a startup company called Getaway has recently launched their service to New Yorkers. The company allows customers to rent out a collection of designer “tiny houses” placed in secluded rural settings north of the city; beginning at $99 per night, the service is hoping to offer respite for overstimulated city folk seeking to unplug and “find themselves.” The company was founded by business student Jon Staff and law student Pete Davis, both from Harvard University, out of discussions with other students about the issues with housing and the need for new ideas to house a new generation. From that came the idea of introducing the experience of Tiny House living to urbanites through weekend rentals.

Inspired by the notion of micro-housing and the powerful rhetoric of the Tiny House movement, initiatives

© thebearwalk.com
© Kataram Studios
© Roderick Aichinger
© Kataram Studios
© Roderick Aichinger
© thebearwalk.com
© Roderick Aichinger
© Rebecca Davis
© Sarah Ruehlow
Courtesy of Instagram @laurenswells
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Courtesy of Instagram @laurenswells
© Roderick Aichinger
© thebearwalk.com
A Tiny Luxury: What are “Tiny Houses” Really Saying About Architecture?
A Tiny Luxury: What are “Tiny Houses” Really Saying About Architecture?
A Tiny Luxury: What are “Tiny Houses” Really Saying About Architecture?
© thebearwalk.com
© thebearwalk.com
© thebearwalk.com
© Roderick Aichinger
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6 Castle Fortresses Across Europe, as Selected by Sketchfab

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 Today, thanks to our partnership with Sketchfab, we take you on a virtual tour of some of the most breathtaking historic fortresses across Europe. The design of castles and fortress complexes are particularly interesting because of their strategic siting and defense mechanisms. As strongholds of territorial claim, fortress complexes are meant to be self-sustaining in times of conflict and contain not only defense fortifications but a suite of supporting structures such as chapels, schools, and housing. This effectively turns fortress complexes into a village within a village. These richly detailed scans hosted on Sketchfab allow us to see in detail the urban planning strategies of different historic periods and places. For a more immersive experience, all of these models can be viewed on a virtual reality headset such as Google Cardboard.

Portugal: Forte da Graça

Portugal’s King Joseph ordered the Fortress of Our Lady of Grace to be constructed in 1763, and
Continue reading "6 Castle Fortresses Across Europe, as Selected by Sketchfab"

These Are The 21 Architects You Will Meet in the Office

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© Leandro Fuenzalida © Leandro Fuenzalida Architecture is a broad field of practice, an industry where individual personalities are embraced as intrinsically part of the job. We’re all architects and we all live for design but we’re quite a varied bunch. Here we’ve cheekily compiled a list of the 21 different architects you’ll meet at some point in your career. The Stealth Fighter This architect manages to fly under the radar, seemingly just zooming in and out of Revit all day. You wonder how he keeps his job…until one day he sweeps in from underneath you and gets the promotion. The Entrepreneur Architects often have to wear many hats in the office and this one is particularly good at wearing the accountant hat and would probably find this article useful. Thanks for keeping the numbers out of the red! The Project Manager There has to be someone keeping all the silly little designers on
© Leandro Fuenzalida
© Leandro Fuenzalida
© Leandro Fuenzalida
Continue reading "These Are The 21 Architects You Will Meet in the Office"

Discover the Grit and Glory of New Belgrade’s Communist Architecture

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© Piotr Bednarski © Piotr Bednarski In the autumn of 2014, Piotr Bednarski, a Warsaw-based architectural photographer, visited the municipality of Novi Beograd (New Belgrade), a planned city built in 1948 which constitutes one of Belgrade Serbia’s 17 municipalities. There, he quickly fell in love with the gritty Communist-era architecture of the area. He writes:
In Warsaw, where I'm from, most of the residential buildings from the Communist era [have been] turned into kitschy, colorful blocks… Seeing the dense, raw and, desolate modernist architecture, and rediscovering the atmosphere of my childhood made me fall in love with Novi's neighborhood. I saw people from different social backgrounds living peacefully in one place.

Since that initial trip, Piotr has made multiple return visits to capture the city in a variety of thought-provoking ways, showing long span views of the city, the streetscape, and even the view from inside people’s apartments. He believes

© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski
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Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

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 Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. With this year’s edition featuring not just one pavilion but four additional “summer houses,” the program shows no sign of slowing down. Each of the previous sixteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 16th Pavilion this month, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public. 

Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliams Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Hélène Binet Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © © Iwan Baan The premise behind the creation of the pavilions is simple: an architect who has not built in the UK is

Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Hélène Binet
Serpentine Pavilion 2001. Image © Hélène Binet
Serpentine Pavilion 2002. Image © Sylvain Deleu
Serpentine Pavilion 2003. Image © Sylvain Deleu
Serpentine Pavilion 2005. Image © Sylvain Deleu
Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach
Serpentine Pavilion 2007. Image © Luke Hayes
Serpentine Pavilion 2008. Image © John Offenbach
Serpentine Pavilion 2009. Image © Claire Byrne
Serpentine Pavilion 2010. Image © John Offenbach
Serpentine Pavilion 2011. Image © John Offenbach
Serpentine Pavilion 2012. Image © Iwan Baan
Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliams
Serpentine Pavilion 2014. Image © George Rex
Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © NAARO
Serpentine Pavilion 2016. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
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Quadratura Circuli Aim to Revive Russian Religious Architecture with Cultural Center in Reykjavic

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Courtesy of Cuadratura Circuli Courtesy of Cuadratura Circuli Religious architecture in Russia, arguably, remains backward-looking. With the Soviet Union’s anti-religious stance in the 20th century, religious architecture found little opportunity to grow. Russian architect, Philip Yakubchuk argues that only recently has religious Russian architecture begun “learning to walk again” as it discovers its once-rich history. Quadratura Circuli, a trio of young Russian designers Daniil Makarov, Ivan Zemlyakov, and Yakubchuk, are eager to move beyond the image of St Basil’s Cathedral—seeking to revitalize and create a new image of Russian religious architecture for the 21st century. The group’s Latin name translates to “Squaring the Circle” which is a metaphor used to describe a task that is believed to be impossible—a striking name for a group dedicated entirely to “designing temples for the people of today.” However, with their proposal for a Russian Orthodox Cultural Center in Reykjavik, Iceland, Cuadratura Circuli demonstrates
Courtesy of Cuadratura Circuli
Courtesy of Cuadratura Circuli
Courtesy of Cuadratura Circuli
Courtesy of Cuadratura Circuli
Courtesy of Cuadratura Circuli
Courtesy of Cuadratura Circuli
Courtesy of Cuadratura Circuli
Courtesy of Cuadratura Circuli
Courtesy of Cuadratura Circuli
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A Floating Timber Pavilion Takes Center Stage at Manifesta 11 in Zurich

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© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu On June 11th, the European Biennial of Contemporary Art, also known as Manifestabegan its 100-day stint in this edition's host city, Zurich, Switzerland. The festival's center-piece is a timber raft floating on Lake Zurich, known as the Pavilion of Reflections. The temporary structure was designed and realized by Studio Tom Emerson and a team of thirty students from ETH Zurich. Constructed primarily of timber, Christian Jankowski, curator of Manifesta 11, describes the exhibit “as a floating multi-functional platform with a giant LED screen, a stand for spectators, a swimming pool and a bar.”

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu
The pavilion's varied program responds to the biennial's founding desire “to explore the psychological and geographical territory of Europe and to provide a dynamic for cultural exchange throughout the region.” Seeking to represent the social dynamics of the host city, Zurich, the design team
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
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