Look Inside the Vatican Venice Biennale Chapels in New Video from Spirit of Space

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Norman Foster. Image Courtesy of Foster + Partners Norman Foster. Image Courtesy of Foster + Partners

Vatican City participated in the Venice Architecture Biennale for the first time this year, inviting the public to explore a sequence of unique chapels designed by renowned architects including Norman Foster and Eduardo Souto de Moura. Located in the woods that cover the island of San Giorgio Maggiore, the chapels offer interpretations of Gunnar Asplund’s 1920 chapel at Woodland Cemetery in Stockholm, a seminal example of modernist memorial architecture set in a similarly natural wooded context.

A new video produced by Spirit of Space offers a brief virtual tour of the structures that make up the Holy See’s pavilion, lingering on each just long enough to show different views and angles. As members of the public circulate through the chapels in each shot, the scenes give an impression of how each chapel guides circulation. 

The rapid pace of the video

Eduardo Souto de Moura. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
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10 Unconventional Plywood Projects That Show The Bright Future of 20th Century Materials

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Courtesy of PRODUCE Workshop Courtesy of PRODUCE Workshop

Sold in standard 4 foot wide sheets since 1928, plywood has been a staple of conventional construction for nearly a century. Dimensionally strong, easily cut, lightweight and capable of creating an effective barrier, plywood and other engineered panels like OSB, particle board, and MDF is ubiquitous, particularly for their use as sheathing material in balloon and timber frame construction systems. Boats, airplanes and even automobile frames have historically been built out of plywood, predating (or replacing) steel, aluminum, and fiberglass. As a simple material capable of being manipulated and shaped in a wide variety of ways, sheet ply was also favored in furniture and architectural designs by modernists including Charles and Ray Eames, Eero Saarinen, Alvar Aalto, and Marcel Breuer.

The TWIST installation at Timber Expo, Birmingham NEC.. Image © Patrick Tanhuanco The TWIST installation at Timber Expo, Birmingham NEC.. Image © Patrick Tanhuanco

Woodworking techniques based on adhering together thin lams of

© Jason Mandella
© Marcin Dondajewski
Courtesy of AREA and Electrotexture Lab
A 2-story WikiHouse design constructed in 2014 for the London Design Festival.. Image © Margaux Carron www.margauxcarron.com
© Eric Dinardi
© James Dow
© Victoria Capranica
Courtesy of Pablo Esteban Zamorano
Courtesy of AREA and Electrotexture Lab
Courtesy of TOMA!
© Sófocles Hernández
© Rien van Rijthoven
© João Morgado
© Alan Jensen
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Caroline Bos, David Adjaye, Li Xiaodong and Many Others to Speak at 2018 World Architecture Festival

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The 2018 edition of WAF will be held in Amsterdam, 28-30 November.. Image Courtesy of WAF The 2018 edition of WAF will be held in Amsterdam, 28-30 November.. Image Courtesy of WAF

After two years in Berlin, the World Architecture Festival will move their 2018 edition to Amsterdam for three days of talks, design presentations, and award ceremonies featuring cutting-edge contemporary works and some of the most prominent figures in architecture today. 

The festival, which will be held from 28-30 November at the Amsterdam RAI Exhibition and Convention Center, will give nearly 500 practices from around the world a chance to present their designs to a group of over 100 designated international judges

These judges will be lead by the 2018 Super Jury, a select group including Sir David Adjaye OBE (principal, Adjaye Associates), Nathalie de Vries (director and co-founder, MVRDV), Mohsen Mostafavi (dean, Harvard Graduate School of Design) and Li Xiadong (founder, Li Xiaodong Atelier). The judges will select winners in over 30 categories, highlighting both completed and future

Speakers, clockwise from top left: David Adjaye, Caroline Bos, Sir Peter Cook, Kees Christiaanse, Lesley Lokko, and Li Xiaodong. Image Courtesy of WAF
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These Are The 50 Smartest Cities in the World in 2018

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© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/22240293@N05'>Flickr user Francisco Diaz</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>. Image: New York City, ranked #1 on the Cities In Motion Index © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/22240293@N05'>Flickr user Francisco Diaz</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>. Image: New York City, ranked #1 on the Cities In Motion Index

The Center for Globalization and Strategy from Barcelona’s IESE Business School has unveiled its annual list of the world’s smartest cities. In its fifth year, the IESE Cities in Motion Index has calculated the performance scores for 165 cities across 80 countries based on an exhaustive rubric of economic and social indicators. Familiar global power centers have maintained their position at the top of the heap, while expanded categories of assessment have helped a few small cities advance their position drastically.

© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=User:Someformofhuman&action=edit&redlink=1'>Wikimedia user chensiyuan</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>. Image: Hong Kong, ranked #9 on the Cities In Motion Index © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=User:Someformofhuman&action=edit&redlink=1'>Wikimedia user chensiyuan</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>. Image: Hong Kong, ranked #9 on the Cities In Motion Index

Under the direction of Professors Pascual Berrone and Joan Enric Ricart, the school’s Cities

© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=User:Someformofhuman&action=edit&redlink=1'>Wikimedia user Someformofhuman</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>. Image: Singapore, ranked #6 on the Cities In Motion Index
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Office Manuals from the Past Century Expose the Realities of Architectural Practice

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© Lars Müller via Metropolis Magazine © Lars Müller via Metropolis Magazine

The guiding principles and priorities that drive the professional practice of architecture are the subject of abundant philosophical ideas and entrenched opinions—but how can we understand the current state of the profession without sweeping generalizations? Towards that goal, OfficeUS (the experimental institution born from the US Pavilion at the 2014 Venice Biennale) has published a book examining the realities of today’s architectural workplace culture based, like countless works of cultural studies across many academic disciplines, on the documents produced by that culture. Specifically, the OfficeUS publication compiles information from office manuals and workplace handbooks spanning the last century of architectural practice to offer a practical but insightful portrait of how architects organize, run, and view their own profession.

In a new interview with Metropolis Magazine, OfficeUS Manual editors Eva Franch i Gilabert, Carlos Mínguez Carrasco, and Jacob Reidel explain their motivations for

Editors (from left) Carlos Mínguez Carrasco, Eva Franch i Gilabert, Jacob Reidel. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/storefront/24015726777'>Flickr user Storefront for Art and Architecture</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a>
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ArchDaily’s Co-Founder David Basulto Shares Our Guiding Philosophies in Podcast Interview

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Courtesy of The Midnight Charette Courtesy of The Midnight Charette

In the ten years since our site was launched, ArchDaily has grown into the world’s most visited architecture website; it is now a project with greater reach and scale than the site’s founders could ever have anticipated. Thanks to our readers, contributors and leadership, the initial iteration of the site (based in Chile and known as Plataforma Arquitectura) has evolved into a global architecture media network that includes the English site you’re reading right now as well as region and language-specific sister sites in Brazil, China, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru.

The story of ArchDaily's growth is one of the many topics covered in a new 114-minute interview with ArchDaily’s co-founder David Basulto on this week’s episode of the Midnight Charette podcast. Hosted by David Lee and Marina Bourderonnet, the podcast features weekly discussions on design issues of the day and interviews with figures in

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Steven Holl Architects, Studio Libeskind Among Finalists for University College Dublin’s Campus Makeover

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Courtesy of John  Ronan  Architects  /  Malcolm  Reading  Consultants Courtesy of John Ronan Architects / Malcolm Reading Consultants

After receiving 98 entries from teams based in 23 different countries, the jury for University College Dublin’s Future Campus project has selected six proposals for their shortlist, putting each selected firm’s design on display to the public on the project’s website. The finalists include the American firms Steven Holl Architects, Studio LibeskindDiller Scofidio + Renfro and John Ronan Architects, as well as the Dutch firm UNStudio and Irish architects O’Donnell + Tuomey.

The project will include two major changes to UCD’s Belfield campus, located about 5 km from Dublin’s city center: a major update to the campus’ entry precinct along Stillorgan Road, as well as a new 8,000 square meter Centre for Creative Design, which will house UCD’s design studios.

Courtesy of Diller  Scofidio  +  Renfro  /  Malcolm  Reading  Consultants Courtesy of Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Malcolm Reading Consultants

The new €48M Centre for

Courtesy of Studio  Libeskind  /  Malcolm  Reading  Consultants
Courtesy of Studio  Libeskind  /  Malcolm  Reading  Consultants
Courtesy of UNStudio  /  Malcolm  Reading  Consultants
Courtesy of O’Donnell  +  Tuomey  /  Malcolm  Reading  Consultants
Courtesy of Diller  Scofidio  +  Renfro  /  Malcolm  Reading  Consultants
Courtesy of John  Ronan  Architects  /  Malcolm  Reading  Consultants
Courtesy of O’Donnell  +  Tuomey  /  Malcolm  Reading  Consultants
Courtesy of Steven  Holl  Architects  /  Malcolm  Reading  Consultants
Courtesy of Studio  Libeskind  /  Malcolm  Reading  Consultants
Courtesy of UNStudio  /  Malcolm  Reading  Consultants
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A Look at the Late-20th Century “High Tech” Architecture Movement

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By <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/stawarz/">Andrew Stawarz</a> - <span> licensed under </span>, <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/">CC BY-ND 2.0</a>, <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/stawarz/6249670899">Link</a> By <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/stawarz/">Andrew Stawarz</a> - <span> licensed under </span>, <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/">CC BY-ND 2.0</a>, <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/stawarz/6249670899">Link</a>

From a historical perspective, visiting a significant work of architecture only amounts to a fractional part of what it takes to understand its importance. Context is crucial; every project responds to the society around it as much as it does the site that it inhabits, and it represents a synthesis of precedents and a point of inspiration for works that follow. As recently featured in Metropolis Magazine, these dynamics take center stage in a new exhibition staged in Norman Foster’s seminal Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, a contemporary landmark built in 1978 on the campus of the University in East Anglia in Norwich, England. Entitled Superstructures: The New Architecture: 1960–1990, the exhibit explores the central trends in post-war 20th-century building design, highlighting the historical context

© Wikimedia user Nigel Chadwick licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
By <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/martinrp/">.Martin.</a> - <span> licensed under </span>, <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/">CC BY-ND 2.0</a>, <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/martinrp/376598421">Link</a>
© Wikimedia user Oxyman licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
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Olson Kundig Chosen To Design The Bob Dylan Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma

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Courtesy of Olson Kundig Courtesy of Olson Kundig

With construction underway on their renovation of the Space NeedleOlson Kundig will shift their focus to a different American icon. The Seattle firm has unveiled their proposal as lead architect and exhibit designer for The Bob Dylan Center—a new museum that will also house the Bob Dylan Archive in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Sponsored by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and the University of Tulsa, the center is expected to open in 2021, with groundbreaking planned for 2019 in the Tulsa Arts District.

Courtesy of Olson Kundig Courtesy of Olson Kundig

Acquired by the Foundation and University in 2016, the Bob Dylan Archive contains over 100,000 artifacts from every era of the folk legend’s career. When the Bob Dylan Center is completed, the collection will curate exhibitions that include unreleased recordings from both live concerts and studio sessions, Bob’s handwritten notebooks and manuscripts, musical instruments, artwork, photographs, films and more. The

Courtesy of Olson Kundig
© John Cohen
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Harvard Researchers Detail the 9 Factors That Make a Healthy Building

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© Adolf Bereuter © Adolf Bereuter

Last month Harvard University’s School of Public Health re-launched their Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment, introducing new partnerships and a new director for the institutional home of Dr. Joseph Allen’s Healthy Buildings initiative. With the stated mission of “improving the lives of all people, in all buildings, everywhere, every day,” the Healthy Buildings Team is leading research on how today’s built environments impact the health, productivity, and well-being of the people who inhabit them; as well as how future buildings can help us live healthier lives.

In the interest of defining their terms and presenting their research in a way that audiences outside academia can understand and incorporate into their work, the Healthy Buildings team have released an exhaustive list that details the simple foundations of making a building healthy.

The 9 foundations for healthy buildings are as follows:

via Harvard C-CHANGE via Harvard C-CHANGE

© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Harvard_School_of_Public_Health,_Boston_MA.jpg'>Wikimedia user Faolin42</a> licensed under CC-BY-3.0. Image: Harvard School of Public Health's F.X. Bagnoud Building by Payette (1996)
© Adolf Bereuter
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Scarpa + Brooks Explore How Architecture Can Shape Memory

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Why do we remember buildings, locations, and experiences? Even a place visited in our childhood can conjure emotions that make an impact on us through the memories they create. Angela Brooks and Larry Scarpa explain that the work of Brooks + Scarpa Architects aspires to make a lasting impression out of even a brief encounter. “We try to leave something behind,” says Scarpa, “something ingrained in people’s memory that sticks with them.”

© Ben Benschneider © Ben Benschneider

The Los Angeles-based firm shares the philosophy behind their design process in a profile from Breadtruck Films entitled “Memory: Frame.” The four-minute micro-documentary incorporates interview scenes with Angela Brooks and Larry Scarpa, drone footage of a few of the firm’s projects, and shots of the design process in progress at their studio.

© John Linden © John Linden

Brooks explains that regardless of a project’s scale, the firm considers the experience of everyone who will eventually

© Tara Wucjik
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This Concept Uses a Pre-Fabricated Timber System to Enable Modern, Self-Built Homes

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Courtesy of Space Popular Courtesy of Space Popular

Solutions from the past can often provide practical answers for the problems of the future; as the London-based design and research firm, Space Popular demonstrate with their "Timber Hearth" concept. It is a building system that uses prefabrication to help DIY home-builders construct their own dwellings without needing to rely on professional or specialized labor. Presented as part of the ongoing 2018 Venice Biennale exhibition “Plots Prints Projections,” the concept takes inspiration from the ancient "hearth" tradition to explain how a system designed around a factory-built core can create new opportunities for the future of home construction.

Realized in the form of a brightly-painted model in the exhibition space at Serra dei Giardini, the Timber Hearth system gathers all the service functions, appliances, and fittings that require professional installation in typical residential buildings and contains them within a prefabricated hearth-like structure.

© CVFH © CVFH

Fabricated in a

© Marco Franceschini
Courtesy of Space Popular
Courtesy of Space Popular
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Kenzo Tange Gymnasium and 7 Other Threatened Sites Receive $1M in Preservation Funding

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By <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/all-a/">Take</a> - <span> licensed under </span>, <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/">CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>, <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/all-a/14631188464/in/photolist-ojRF54-ohUEyb-o1AWYo-o1Cd1H-ohUEA5-ohUEu3-ohUEob-oi4gyy-o1AWW9-ojRERP-o1CcQn-ojREWi-o1BaKU-yYPDAf-o1BaYu-ohUEjo">Link</a> By <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/all-a/">Take</a> - <span> licensed under </span>, <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/">CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>, <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/all-a/14631188464/in/photolist-ojRF54-ohUEyb-o1AWYo-o1Cd1H-ohUEA5-ohUEu3-ohUEob-oi4gyy-o1AWW9-ojRERP-o1CcQn-ojREWi-o1BaKU-yYPDAf-o1BaYu-ohUEjo">Link</a>

Eight sites from the World Monuments Fund’s 2018 World Monuments Watch list have been awarded $1 million in funding from American Express to support much-needed preservation and restoration initiatives. The sites were selected based on their vulnerability to specific threats like natural disasters, climate change or social forces like urbanization that have left them neglected.

© Flickr user Michael D Beckwith licensed under public domain © Flickr user Michael D Beckwith licensed under public domain

“We recognize these sites as symbols of national and local identity, and value the role that their preservation can play in attracting visitors and revitalizing communities,” said Timothy J. McClimon, President of the American Express Foundation. The sites to be protected include entire regions of Spain and Zimbabwe and specific cultural sites in Mexico and Italy as well as individual structures like the

© Tange Associates
© Flickr user Richard Matthews licensed under CC BY 2.0
© Wikimedia user Pablo Fossas licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
© Flickr user Alessandro Berrettoni licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0
© Flikr user onion83 licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
© Flickr user Susan E Adams licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0
© Wikimedia user Zarateman licensed under public domain
© Wikimedia user Paris Histoire licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
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15 Inspiring Architecture School Buildings from Around the World

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© Matthew Carbone © Matthew Carbone

Architecture schools and the students they house have a particularly unique and interesting building-user relationship. Architecture students value the buildings of their school not only for providing the valuable work space necessary for constructing studio projects but also as an example and model of a building in use. As the buildings are the places where students first learn how to read and understand architecture, design schools become full-scale teaching tools that help new designers grasp structure, details, how materials perform and interact, and so many of the other core concepts of architecture. While the scrutiny of students and faculty can be exhaustive, architects have embraced the challenge of creating engaging works of architecture that both suit the specific needs of a school and take on the pedagogical challenge of educating students by example.

© Bob Gundu © Bob Gundu

Buildings for teaching and learning architecture are often part of a

© Matthew Carbone
© Timothy Hursley
© Peter Bennetts
© Peter Bennetts
© Åke E:son Lindman
© Åke E:son Lindman
© Richard Barnes
© Richard Barnes
© Philippe Blanc
© Philippe Blanc
© Bob Gundu
© Bob Gundu
© Philippe Ruault
© Philippe Ruault
© Peter Bennetts
© Peter Bennetts
© Timothy Hursley
© Timothy Hursley
© Julien Lanoo
© Julien Lanoo
Courtesy of gwathmey siegel & associates architects
Courtesy of gwathmey siegel & associates architects
© Ben Rahn/A-Frame
© Ben Rahn/A-Frame
© Paul Warchol
© Paul Warchol
© Scott Frances
© Scott Frances
© Matthew Carbone
© Luc Boegly
© Luc Boegly
Continue reading "15 Inspiring Architecture School Buildings from Around the World"

10 Boathouses That Take Architecture Over the Edge of Dry Land

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© Paul Ott photografiert © Paul Ott photografiert

Whether lining a river bustling with rowing crews or sitting calmly at the edge of a lake, boathouses have a storied history and an inexplicable romance to match their unusual program. Designed for use as a training facility for elite rowers, a vacationer’s waterfront playgroundshoreline retreat, or even as a historical preservation project, boathouses captivate the imagination as they transcend the limits of the land-form relationship on their site.

© Steve Hall/Hedrich Blessing © Steve Hall/Hedrich Blessing

Leaving land creates a number of challenges and opportunities for an architect, particularly in creating a stable base for a building on the edge of dry land. As seen in the following collection of contemporary boathouse projects, waterfront structures can tower over the water on piles, float on a buoyant platform, or perch comfortably on the coast and connect to the water with an extended boat ramp. The relationship

© Paul Ott photografiert
© John Lewis Marshall
© John Lewis Marshall
© Steve Hall/Hedrich Blessing
© Steve Hall/Hedrich Blessing
Courtesy of Anmahian Winton Architects
Courtesy of Anmahian Winton Architects
© Martine Hamilton Knight
© Martine Hamilton Knight
© Trodahl Arkitekter / Fredrik Ringe
© Trodahl Arkitekter / Fredrik Ringe
© Jerry Grajewski
© Jerry Grajewski
© Peter Fritz Photography
© Peter Fritz Photography
© Arnaud Marthouret
© Arnaud Marthouret
© Paul Ott photografiert
© Paul Ott photografiert
© Jorge Allende
© Jorge Allende
© Aoguan Performance of Architecture
© Aoguan Performance of Architecture
© Aoguan Performance of Architecture
Continue reading "10 Boathouses That Take Architecture Over the Edge of Dry Land"