Future Airline Interior Cabins Might Become a 180° OLED Display

Future Airline Interior Cabins Might Become a 180° OLED Display Whether you board 1st or last, sip champagne or beg for an extra bag of honey roasted peanuts, the view from the plane is a democratically ho-hum experience from any seat. Tiny, frosted and scratched plastic windows – hardly changed since the era of propeller-based flights – offer the most modest and warped glimpses of outside. But in the possible future, travelers might be offered a flying experience not unlike IMAX, with an all-encompassing OLED display simulating sensory-stimulating views not unlike wearing an Oculus Rift headset. British technology research company, CPI (Centre for Process Innovation), envisions a near future when planes will be outfitted with low resolution flexible OLED displays (just 150 ppi resolution) embedded into fuselage lining panels and across seat backs, extending the view from outside the plane into the inside cabin. These multi-screen panels can be used either as entertainment displays, lighting, and likely for cabin crew notification and safety presentations, and in the process reducing overall weight. Future Airline Interior Cabins Might Become a 180° OLED Display in technology main Category Future Airline Interior Cabins Might Become a 180° OLED Display in technology main Category Future Airline Interior Cabins Might Become a 180° OLED Display in technology main Category Of course the tradeoff will be aircraft outfitted with this speculated future display technology will lose windows altogether, and the possibility those fearful of flying might experience increased dread with an inescapable 180° view of flying thousands of feet above the sky surrounds them, not to mention whether this sort of technology will only be reserved for those with first class tickets, leaving us economy class fliers still fighting for a window seat.






Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker

Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker With its tanned leather strap and 10″ x 5.6″ muted green, grey, and black polycarbonate-ABS polymer grilles on each side, the svelte B&O BeoPlay A2 could be mistaken for a compact dopp kit or a clutch purse at quick glance. The 2.5 pound design is intentionally similar to those two carry-alls, with portability a key feature for Bang and Olufsen’s wireless Bluetooth speaker compared to competing box or rectilinear shaped audio devices. This device not only wants to be carried around, it demands to be seen. Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker in technology main Category Available in three colors, the Green and Grey models are remarkably beautiful objects designed by Bang & Olufsen’s Cecilie Manz (the same designer behind another unique portable, the picnic basket-shaped Beolit 12), with a profile harkening back to the smaller 1963 Telefunken transistor radio designed by Richard Sapper. A third all-black option is the least interesting of the three colorways, the beautiful contrast detailing of the other two color designs’ polycarbonate-ABS polymer grille and waistband of tinted aluminum neutralized, somehow looking a little more plastic and less premium. Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker in technology main Category Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker in technology main Category Regardless of color, the insides of all three models are the same: a 3″ full-range driver and a ¾” tweeter are driven by three Class D amplifiers for up to 180-watt power, somehow engineered to eke out an impressive 24-hour Li-ion battery life between USB charging. Connectivity via Bluetooth 4.0 with aptX (an upgraded audio codec compression algorithm compared to vanilla Bluetooth wireless) provides the wireless option, while an audio line-in and USB charging port eliminates concerns of running out of battery power or wireless interference during playback. B&O engineers also integrated what they call true360, an omnidirectional sound field technology which provides a consistent audio experience in all directions. Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker in technology main Category Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker in technology main Category Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker in technology main Category Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker in technology main Category Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker in technology main Category Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker in technology main Category Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker in technology main Category Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker in technology main Category Posh Portability: The B&O BeoPlay A2 Speaker in technology main Category Like most everything Bang & Olufsen, even their youth oriented B&O Play portable audio speaker screams premium, reflected by the BeoPlay A2′s $399 price tag. The Grey and Black B&O BeoPlay A2 are already available online, with the Green model listed for pre-order.






The Yves Béhar-Designed Jawbone UP3 Is Very Sensitive (In A Good Way)

The Yves Béhar-Designed Jawbone UP3 Is Very Sensitive (In A Good Way) Jawbone seems acutely aware the fitness wearable segment is getting crowded and competitive, with the likes of the Apple Watch and Microsoft Band elbowing in attempting to establish a position in the hierarchy of wearable technology of today and tomorrow. Jawbone’s latest response is a sophisticated multi-sensor activity wristband monitoring nearly everything a person does from the moment they awaken, throughout the day, and well into the wearer’s sleeping hours, all presented in a slim innovative design where the function hasn’t erased fashion. Ounce for ounce, the Jawbone UP3 may also be the most advanced fitness tracker available for consumers today.
The Yves Béhar Designed Jawbone UP3 Is Very Sensitive (In A Good Way) in technology main Category

Unlike competing smart bands, the UP3 doesn’t offer a display. All data and information is accessed via compatible UP app.

The first thing you’ll notice about this third iteration of the UP band is the eye-catching design, an adjustable wristband utilizing a unique clasp design which permits almost any wrist to comfortably widen or tighten the fit of the UP3, all while keeping the array of sensors connected to the wearer’s skin for consistent monitoring. The array of colors and textures – all designed by industrial designer wunderkind and Jawbone chief creative officer, Yves Béhar – gives the UP3 an almost jeweled bracelet finish, rather than the usual tech-aesthetic language connected to most other personal monitoring devices. A lightweight, yet strong anodized aluminum casing covers a magnesium chassis within, designed to withstand the demands of someone wearing the UP3 from morning to bed. The Yves Béhar Designed Jawbone UP3 Is Very Sensitive (In A Good Way) in technology main Category
The Yves Béhar Designed Jawbone UP3 Is Very Sensitive (In A Good Way) in technology main Category

“With UP3, we have taken this even further and explored hundreds of internal component and sensor layouts, resulting in different widths and lengths of the band. These prototypes, often differing by as little as .3mm, were judged for comfort, size impression, and proportions before we selected the optimal ergonomics for a variety of wrist sizes.” – Yves Béhar

The Yves Béhar Designed Jawbone UP3 Is Very Sensitive (In A Good Way) in technology main Category

“An innovative adjustable clasp had to be invented to allow for the sensor data to travel around the wrist and strap. The clasp mechanism allows the band to slide through a flat metal gate and lock in at just the right size for the user. This maximizes the exposure of the sensors on your skin.” – Yves Béhar

The Yves Béhar Designed Jawbone UP3 Is Very Sensitive (In A Good Way) in technology main Category The Yves Béhar Designed Jawbone UP3 Is Very Sensitive (In A Good Way) in technology main Category But what does the UP3 do besides looking oh so stylish while adorning the wrist? Plenty: • Inside the flexible wrist band, an array of multi-sensors works to record everything the wearer does throughout the day and even while asleep. A new tri-axis accelerometer, bioimpedance sensors, and skin and ambient temperature sensors are on monitoring at all times. The sensors inside are so sensitive, the UP3 can even detect dehydration, and offer advice accordingly. The UP3 also records the all-important resting heart rate; Jawbone promises additional health data metrics will be added via future firmware updates.
• You might be sleeping, but the UP3 will still be awake tracking the sleep patterns and the quality of wearer’s sleep through stages of REM, Light, and Deep patterns, converting the data into a status report for tracking and improving daily sleeping habits.
• The UP3 is not only able to determine how you’re doing, but also what you’re doing. Algorithms, partnered with the multi-sensors – work together to identify the specific type of workout you’ve completed, then offers personalized guidance for improving performance and overall health. Over time, the UP3 is able to take personal biometric data and shape recommendations via the UP App “Smart Coach” feature.
• While Apple’s watch will require daily recharging, the UP3 can go a whole week (7 days) between charges.
• The UP3 is water resistance up to 10 meters, ideal for pool swimmers. The Yves Béhar Designed Jawbone UP3 Is Very Sensitive (In A Good Way) in technology main Category The Yves Béhar Designed Jawbone UP3 Is Very Sensitive (In A Good Way) in technology main Category The Yves Béhar Designed Jawbone UP3 Is Very Sensitive (In A Good Way) in technology main Category The Jawbone UP3 starts at $179, currently only available for pre-order in Silver and Black, each with their own distinct relief surfaces. Jawbone promises additional colors and textures, alongside matching rubber, leather and woven band options, will be released later in 2015.






From Kicks to Cars, Designer Brett Golliff Never Treads Lightly

From Kicks to Cars, Designer Brett Golliff Never Treads Lightly A quick glance at Brett Golliff’s LinkedIn page and one might mistakenly believe the profiles of two different designers has been accidentally merged: one of a footwear designer, with a portfolio representing the Jordan Brand, Nike, and New Balance, the other outlining the experience of an automotive designer for one of the world’s largest automakers. Yet it’s this fascinating dichotomy representing fashion and function which makes Brett Golliff’s path and perspective unique, a designer with an obsessive eye for detail, whether dedicated to the detailing inside the latest Chevrolet or for the shoes pressing down on the car’s gas pedal. From Kicks to Cars, Designer Brett Golliff Never Treads Lightly in technology style fashion main Category As Lead Color and Trim Designer for Chevrolet Performance and Chevrolet Crossover at General Motors, Brett is charged with “evoking emotion through color and material”, a talent first honed while designing footwear, and now visibly imprinted onto the likes of iconic cars like the Corvette Stingray, Z06, and Camaro Z/28. Though not obviously similar, Brett reveals the automotive and footwear industry share many parallels when it comes to designing for a discerning consumer. What was it like to transition from working on functional fashion to choosing automotive material and trim? There’s obviously a greater collaborative element to designing a car compared to a shoe. Or is that a misconception considering sports footwear is now often highly engineered and a material-technical product? The biggest change for me was that so many people work on the car. You really see how the size of General Motors comes into play because people you don’t work with from day to day influence the choices you make. I remember my first Corvette “All People Meeting” where the entire team that worked on the vehicle gets together and it was over 1,000 people. That doesn’t exist in footwear. So collaboration is key in making a vehicle successful. Another change that I encountered was that design couldn’t always be reactive to current trends. Within footwear I could react very quickly to something that was a trend because the consumer was way more forgiving. If I want to drape a shoe in solid magenta there is an audience for it and it will serve its purpose in time. But if I want to do the same to Corvette or Camaro interior it likely won’t be so successful. Consumers consider a car a much different investment [than shoes]. There is an emotional side to it, but not in the same way as footwear. Footwear’s shelf life is seasonal, while automobiles last for decades. From Kicks to Cars, Designer Brett Golliff Never Treads Lightly in technology style fashion main Category
I don’t think the challenges are any different from footwear to cars, as I believe good design balances where you have been and where you are going.

Are there any materials and/or design solutions appearing within automotive interiors today which have a direct corollary to active footwear (or vice versa)? And are there any materials on the horizon which you’d like to begin working with in either category pollinating one industry from the other (Flyknit trim inside the next Vette)? I think the materials of the two industries go hand-in-hand to an extent. They definitely grow from each other in an aesthetic standpoint. The one thing that footwear can do is take more risks. Like I said previously, consumers are more forgiving there because the investment is lower. But the one thing athletic footwear can’t do that automotive can is use very, very high quality materials. The leathers we use for an interior of a Corvette are closer to matching a formal shoe that is $600+ as opposed to the welded synthetics you find on any top line basketball shoe. You mentioned [Nike] FlyKint, I think that if you look across all genre’s of product development currently that we are all looking for our “FlyKnit”. An opportunity to create a product with a material that has endless aesthetic limitations, is lightweight, meets performance standards and is cost effective is always something we will pursue. The big challenge for automotive is finding something that does that but also meets are standards of being iconic. Corvette is over sixty years old and we believe that the materials that were selected on that very first car are just as beautiful today as they were in 1953. We have to make sure that our next development of materials lives up to that same standard. From Kicks to Cars, Designer Brett Golliff Never Treads Lightly in technology style fashion main Category From Kicks to Cars, Designer Brett Golliff Never Treads Lightly in technology style fashion main Category We just got back from Mondial de l’Automobile and one of the things that struck us was how conservative the American market is when it comes to color, finishes, and materials in our cars. Yet the athletic footwear industry is perpetually pushing the bounds of both fashion and function. Why is there a disconnect between what we wear and what we drive here? I think the disconnect comes down to two things: fashion and money. An entry-level car is still more than $10,000. At that point for many it is less about a choice and more about an investment. When you bring [a car like the Corvette] into that conversation, you start at $53,000 and only climb higher. Outside of the ultra, ultra exclusive luxury products like a Birkin bag or something similar, high fashion is still pretty affordable in those standards. In my eyes people are much more willing to take a risk at a lower cost, particularly fashion, because they don’t expect it to last forever. They are only thinking emotionally when it comes to that purchase because it meets their current want. When it comes to a car, it’s a combination of emotion and logic. For many Americans a car is solely about function and they don’t necessarily need a car that screams for them. They might just want it to whisper. For the select few that want to scream – like the Corvette or Camaro buyer – we provide them with very distinct and bold color combinations that really speak to their emotions. A good example of this is on the new Stingray. From Kicks to Cars, Designer Brett Golliff Never Treads Lightly in technology style fashion main Category I created the Adrenaline Red color space (above). The color doesn’t whisper anything, it only screams the emotion of bold performance. Currently it is the second highest selling color interior for the Stingray – second only to Black – I like to think it is because of the approach we took on it. We knew if we were going to feature red we had to feature it in a bold way. That color isn’t a color you can shy away from. If someone is selecting red they are expecting to get red in a dramatic presence, and I think we’ve provided it. So you’ve now not only been responsible for redesigning the Air Jordan line, but you’ve also helped redefine two American icons, the Corvette and Camaro. As a designer, what are the challenges inherent with working on brands connected with such heritage? The brand heritage of Corvette and Camaro are something that I take very seriously. Every time we are kicking off a major project I visit our Heritage Center, our archives so to speak, where I can go through the history of the cars with not just brochures and color swatches but actually with the vehicles physically. It’s one thing to see images of your history, but it is a completely different experience to sit in it, hear it, and ultimately drive it. It really brings the past sixty years of Chevrolet performance through all of your senses. As for challenges, I don’t think the challenges are any different whether for footwear to cars, as I believe good design balances where you have been and where you are going. Where do you most often look to for design inspiration outside of the automotive and footwear industry? I use to rely heavily just on visual inspiration from current trends that I have seen or noticed in life. While I still do that, I am really transitioning to experiential-based inspiration: observing how our products are used and the nature in which they live gets me thinking and helps me builds stories that are relatable to the vehicle. I have been visiting races, car events, and [automotive] shows to immerse myself in the product and really see where it has been and can go. Most recently I visited our race team headquarters at Pratt & Miller, spending the day photographing them as they prepared our C7R racecar for an up-and-coming race. This provided me with so much tangible inspiration for the car and where we want to take it. It was a phenomenal experience. From Kicks to Cars, Designer Brett Golliff Never Treads Lightly in technology style fashion main Category
From Kicks to Cars, Designer Brett Golliff Never Treads Lightly in technology style fashion main Category

I believe good design balances where you have been and where you are going.

From Kicks to Cars, Designer Brett Golliff Never Treads Lightly in technology style fashion main Category
From Kicks to Cars, Designer Brett Golliff Never Treads Lightly in technology style fashion main Category In the next 10 years, what do you predict will transform the automotive interior from a design and materials perspective? I think that the car interior will change dramatically over the next decade. It is becoming more and more evident that our car is going to be more then just a driving vehicle as autonomy comes into play. Combine that with the notion individual design and bespoke editions are going to become more expected as 3D-printing grows, and you will see the car interiors completely transformed. I imagine materials that change with according to the body and atmosphere it is in, materials that transition colors from one area to the next, along with materials that live and interact with you. I think the key thing that will happen is that the interior materials will become a part of you, not just passively there for you like they currently are. From Kicks to Cars, Designer Brett Golliff Never Treads Lightly in technology style fashion main CategoryWhat detail would you like the average person to take note of the next time they’re sitting inside a car or while checking out new shoes? In both cases I’d want them to understand that everything is there for a reason. Everything that you are encountering while slipping into shoes or into a car seat has been created to enhance your experience. There is a story and thought that brought those elements to you, and that many people worked many hours to create something so breathtakingly beautiful for you. So enjoy it! A special thanks to Brett Golliff and the General Motors team. You can also follow Brett on Instagram or Tumblr.






The FES Watch Is an E-Ink Chameleon

The FES Watch Is an E-Ink Chameleon With Microsoft, Apple, and Google now all invested in producing wearable technology in wristwatch form, one might suppose the market for smartwatches has all but been decided. But in reality none of these companies (nor other smartwatch manufacturers like Samsung or Motorola) have yet cracked the code for reigniting any widespread (re)adoption of wearing watches. Smartwatches so far have been one part hope, three parts hype. One of the greatest issues hampering smartwatch adoption is battery life. The recently announced Microsoft smartwatch is said to offer two-day battery life, double of what’s expected from either the Apple Watch, Samsung Galaxy Gear, or Moto 360, all requiring nightly charging cradle time because of the battery drain from powering the display. But perhaps manufacturers should be considering an older, but considerably more energy efficient technology: E-Ink displays. The FES Watch Is an E Ink Chameleon in technology style fashion main Category The Takt Project FES Watch isn’t really a smartwatch, but more akin to a chameleon in watch form, a Swatch-like timepiece using the same E-Ink technology once made popular in Kindle devices allowing wearers to not only change the watch face, but also the whole band instantly. The FES watch allows instant design customization with a press of the watch’s dial/button, offering 24 different patterns to cycle through, with both digital and analog interfaces to choose from. The FES Watch Is an E Ink Chameleon in technology style fashion main Category Although the FES Watch is more of an example of fashion dictating function, the decision to use energy efficient E-Ink rather than an LCD or OLED displays makes one wonder if a monochromatic E-Ink smartwatch with longer battery life – at the cost of losing full color display – is the smarter option at this point in smartwatch history. 2015 will be the year when all the predictions, praise, and complaints come to roost about the smartwatch market. The TAKT Project team is also experimenting with eyeglasses, shoes, and even bowties with similar pattern and color customization controlled via app (we’re intrigued by the idea of being able to upload a user-created design from app to watch or other wearable). We’ll first see how the FES Watch concept fares the transition from concept to consumer product, with an expected delivery date sometimes in May 2015, but rest assured this is just the beginning of wearable technology with fashion customization at the forefront. The FES Watch Is an E Ink Chameleon in technology style fashion main Category The FES Watch Is an E Ink Chameleon in technology style fashion main Category The FES Watch Is an E Ink Chameleon in technology style fashion main Category






The Samsung Induction Range Projects Virtual LED Flames

The Samsung Induction Range Projects Virtual LED Flames Induction cooking – an electromagnetic technology which heats faster, is thermally more efficient, and provides more consistent heating across surfaces compared to either gas or traditional electric stovetops – has quickly staked a spot amongst upper tier home kitchen appliances. But one characteristic missing from the induction cooking experience is the age old visual cue of a flame chefs and home cooks use to gauge heat/intensity when sautéing, frying, boiling, or simmering a meal. What one technology taketh, another technology has giveth back.
The Samsung Induction Range Projects Virtual LED Flames in technology main Category

Samsung’s Induction range directly transfers energy to the cookware for more consistent and instant heat up times; adjust the heat to a low simmer or rapid boil is quicker than either traditional or electric stove tops. Analog dial controls keep in line with traditional, professional cooking appliances.

The team at Samsung has turned to the “it’s everywhere now” LED technology to simulate the cooking flame with their Chef Collection Induction Slide-in Range. Turn on the stove a ring of bright blue LED lights “ignite” across pots or pans, the brightness of the simulated flames corresponding to the heat intensity of the range top. It’s an ingenious solution which adds back to the precision of gas range control back to what probably will eventually become the standard for all cooking ranges in time (both for efficiency and ease). The Samsung Induction Range Projects Virtual LED Flames in technology main Category
The Samsung Induction Range Projects Virtual LED Flames in technology main Category

The brighter the simulated LED illuminated flame, the hotter the stove top’s temperature.

The Samsung Induction Range Projects Virtual LED Flames in technology main Category The new Samsung NE58H9970WS Slide-In Induction Chef Collection Range doesn’t come cheap, available for $3699, but if you’re seeking the latest and greatest in technology in the kitchen, these new appliances sport a feature which will probably impress even those apathetic to the culinary arts.






The Bacteria Killing UV Light Dyson Humidifier

The Bacteria Killing UV Light Dyson Humidifier Dyson seems to share Apple’s design philosophy: develop an iconic form factor and keep evolving it into different iterations. Dyson’s latest offering looks familiar, similar in design as their bladeless Air Multiplier, but shortened in height, and now sporting a three-liter tank of water. The contents are subjected to a 3-minute blast of germ-busting ultraviolet light inside the receptacle, eliminating 99.99% of bacteria before be turned into ultra-fine piezoelectric mist in a process Dyson calls “hygienic humidification”. The Bacteria Killing UV Light Dyson Humidifier in technology main Category The Dyson Humidifier is also engineered to be super quiet for up to 18 hours while humidifying a room – so quiet, the unit has earned recognition by the Noise Abatement Society, a feature particularly attractive to light sleepers. Alongside its hushed acoustic presence, the humidifier is designed to self adjust output and air speed according to room temperature and humidity, with a built-in timer and remote control for additional customization. The only catch: we won’t see the Dyson humidifier until 2015 here in the United States. Just like the recently announced Dyson 360 Eye Robot Vacuum, the Dyson Humidifier will be first sold in Japan before being offered at a yet-to-be announced date domestically in the United States. The Bacteria Killing UV Light Dyson Humidifier in technology main Category The Bacteria Killing UV Light Dyson Humidifier in technology main Category The Bacteria Killing UV Light Dyson Humidifier in technology main Category






Connecting Flight: Bluesmart Smart Carry-On Luggage

Connecting Flight: Bluesmart Smart Carry-On Luggage The experienced traveler knows whenever possible it’s best to strategize, to optimize, and pack everything into a carry-on, avoiding the wait-and-unpredictable-fate of checked-in luggage. But even those with a million frequent flier miles under their belt know there’s always room for improvement in the art of traveling light. Bluesmart might be that awaited upgrade, the first travel luggage designed from the ground up to work in harmony with mobile devices to help solve common concerns related to the goal of traveling efficiently. Connecting Flight: Bluesmart Smart Carry On Luggage in technology main Category Besides the eye-catching blue detailing on the four spinner wheels and handles, Bluesmart’s distinguishing features are mostly hidden from view. But launch a compatible iOS or Android app and the compact luggage reveals a James Bond array of technology – micro-sensors, actuators, and a microcomputer with GPS that communicates with smartphones via Bluetooth. Connecting Flight: Bluesmart Smart Carry On Luggage in technology main Category
Connecting Flight: Bluesmart Smart Carry On Luggage in technology main Category

Bluesmart’s developers plan to integrate social and data tracking features summarizing travel patterns.

For example, pull the bag’s pull handle upward and the Bluesmart will display the total weight via app onto the screen of a compatible iOS or Android device, informing the user whether it’s time to cull their contents or to get ready for an extra baggage fee. Lock and unlock is also handled via app with a TSA approved master key lock, with an integrated proximity sensor designed to keep track of bags both when nearby and also when in-transit, sending out notifications via Bluetooth if/when the Bluesmart leaves a predetermined radius. Connecting Flight: Bluesmart Smart Carry On Luggage in technology main Category Additionally, a built-in battery pack offers up to 6x device charging for two mobile devices at the same time, eliminating the need to pack an extra mobile battery charger. Three layers of polycarbonate and anodized aluminum on the outside protect laptops, tablets, and phones stored within while an ingenious flap design makes accessing or storing laptops and tablets an easy task for TSA security line inspections. Connecting Flight: Bluesmart Smart Carry On Luggage in technology main Category
More than 25 million bags are lost or mishandled by airlines every year. With the advent of microcomputers and the Internet of Things we have the opportunity to prevent these problems while providing a smarter option to travelers of the connected generation.

- Bluesmart co-founder Brian Chen Connecting Flight: Bluesmart Smart Carry On Luggage in technology main Category Bluesmart Technologies is planning to release their smart carry-on beginning July 2015, and are seeking funding via Indiegogo.






Ghostly & Behance Action Method Notebooks For Designers

Ghostly & Behance Action Method Notebooks For Designers The Action Method? In essence, it’s the process of breaking down a project into three primary components: action steps (specific tasks; “do this”), reference (notes, sketches, research, links), and things on the backburner (“for later, but worth keeping”). It’s a creative procedural and organizational system designed to navigate brainstorm sessions into executable tasks – the equivalent of wrangling a chaotic ant swarm into a focused line. Ghostly & Behance Action Method Notebooks For Designers in style fashion main art Category Ghostly & Behance Action Method Notebooks For Designers in style fashion main art Category The system has been around since 2006, developed internally by design promotional, consulting, and online portfolio site, Behance and grew out externally to be shared online and in printed form. Once developed into a full fledged online tool, but recently shuttered, the Action Method lives on in perhaps its still superior pen-to-paper format using pre-printed Action Pads to organize brainstorming sessions. Each Action Book motivates users to: Capture Action steps, relentlessly. During a brainstorm/meeting or on the run, ideas can come and go unless they are captured as action steps.
Tend to your Backburner. Keep a “Backburner” to catch ideas that may someday become actions. Whether it is an idea for the future or some small errand you want to remember, put it in the backburner and then forget about it.
Think beyond lines and boxes. The dot matrix on the front and back of each page serves as a subtle guide for your notations and sketches.
Preparation and Focus Items. Plan for meetings beforehand and be sure to address your focus items. Ghostly & Behance Action Method Notebooks For Designers in style fashion main art Category Behance recently announced it found itself a spiritual creative partner in record label and art company, Ghostly, adding a refreshed and apparition branded Action Book and Dot Gridded Book amongst several other Action Method notebooks. Ghostly & Behance Action Method Notebooks For Designers in style fashion main art Category Ghostly & Behance Action Method Notebooks For Designers in style fashion main art Category Ghostly & Behance Action Method Notebooks For Designers in style fashion main art Category
“Brainstorming from our apartments during the hours outside our day jobs, we used our personal Action Pads to capture and complete countless action steps that ultimately pushed Behance from vision to reality.”

Ghostly & Behance Action Method Notebooks For Designers in style fashion main art Category Ghostly & Behance Action Method Notebooks For Designers in style fashion main art Category Ghostly & Behance Action Method Notebooks For Designers in style fashion main art Category As a designer/writer who has been dabbling in using other actionable daily/weekly planners using free online templates to good success, I’m excited about using something a little more self-contained and aesthetically executed beyond the binder clipped collections of paper that can quickly accumulate while keeping tabs on projects throughout the weeks, months, and year. These new printed Action Method notebooks will especially appeal to those who believe writing or drawing something down helps memory retention when compared to typing or copying and pasting resources.






Eras of Design Inspire Custom 3D Printed Covers For the Panasonic LUMIX GM1

Eras of Design Inspire Custom 3D Printed Covers For the Panasonic LUMIX GM1 It was just last week we shared the insights and opinions of industrial designer David Tonge about the future of digital photography, a conversation which led to the importance of retaining a physical connection with the mechanical past even as our interactions with design becomes increasingly virtual. Perhaps Tonge would appreciate the material exploration Panasonic unveiled at Photokina 2014 in Cologne in partnership with German design firm WertelOberfell and 3D printing company Materialise as a conceptual exploration hinting at the possibilities 3D printing opens for consumer electronics. Eras of Design Inspire Custom 3D Printed Covers For the Panasonic LUMIX GM1 in technology main Category Eras of Design Inspire Custom 3D Printed Covers For the Panasonic LUMIX GM1 in technology main Category Eras of Design Inspire Custom 3D Printed Covers For the Panasonic LUMIX GM1 in technology main Category Together the Epochs Collection represents and honors three modern eras of design: Art Nouveau, Modernism and Digitalism. Utilizing additive manufacturing, each of the highly intricate detailed cases was designed to snap onto the pocket-sized Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GM1 seamlessly as a user customization option. Most intriguing of the three is the protruding ribcage of copper wire forming a hand grip gracing the Art Nouveau Epoch case – offering a uniquely chaotic surface serving a purpose beyond aesthetics – an ergonomic upgrade where texture and form should improve in-hand comfort. Eras of Design Inspire Custom 3D Printed Covers For the Panasonic LUMIX GM1 in technology main Category Eras of Design Inspire Custom 3D Printed Covers For the Panasonic LUMIX GM1 in technology main Category Eras of Design Inspire Custom 3D Printed Covers For the Panasonic LUMIX GM1 in technology main Category Though just a proof-of-concept design, the Epoch Collection idea is an interesting nod to smartphone case customization and more than hints Panasonic is considering a future when digital cameras could be accessorized/customized for both aesthetics and ergonomics with relative snap-on ease.
Eras of Design Inspire Custom 3D Printed Covers For the Panasonic LUMIX GM1 in technology main Category

(Left to right) Art Nouveau copper wire pattern, Digital offers a perforated speaker style front, Modern is covered in a woven rubberized structure.








Interview With David Tonge of the Division: The Future Form of the Camera

Interview With David Tonge of the Division: The Future Form of the Camera Industrial designer, David Tonge’s portfolio is as diverse as esteemed. In the 1990s, Tonge worked alongside design luminaries Bill Moggridge and Naoto Fukasawa as Industrial Design Director at IDEO Product Development in San Francisco, and currently operates international design consultation firm, the Division with partner, Nicole Hodgkinson. Recipient of various design awards in the UK, Germany, Japan and the United States, Tonge’s designs have been exhibited at the London Design Museum. Currently splitting his time between a home base in London and regularly exploring Tokyo, David was kind enough to take spare some time to share the details about the Division’s latest concept spurred on by an affinity for digital photography and the hope to make it a better experience for all.
Interview With David Tonge of the Division: The Future Form of the Camera in technology main Category

David Tonge and Nicole Hodgkinson founded London based design studio, the Division, in 2003.

Could you describe the impetus for this digital imaging design? Was the motivation inspired by a personal experience or an observation of colleagues/friends behavior in regards to smartphone photography? A simple observation is that camera manufacturers, maybe except Canon and Nikon, are struggling. Yet the more marginal manufacturers insist on continuing to develop the same kinds of products, albeit smarter, with more higher (but, similar) specs. At the moment, and for the last few years, the focus has been on the retro-style (e.g. the Olympus Pen series) which the Panasonic Lumix is an example of. But these cameras are essentially offer the same [design] interface; from a design language perspective it’s all about the lens. None are particularly user focused, relative to smartphones. Interview With David Tonge of the Division: The Future Form of the Camera in technology main Category Meanwhile smart phones have been making taking photos easier, with more intuitive interfaces and less photography language fluency required. They are designed for people who don’t care about apertures and film speed, but do care about recording and sharing. In addition to my cameras, I am also using my phone for the same purposes. But crucially the accessibility of the smartphone experience is directing people away from using compact cameras. You do have to ask,”Why have another camera when I already have a phone in my pocket?”
“What interface would get smart phone users excited about using a dedicated camera?”

So our goal was to start from a user’s view perspective: beginning with a phone, then adding features which would allow them to improve the average person’s photography skills with a better lens. And from a manufacturer’s view point: if we adjust our approach to meet this user half way, what characteristics would the device offer? How would it relate to the classic camera and current mobile devices? Basically our feeling is that this meshing between digital with mechanical can lead to something more interesting compared with how the manufacturers are currently thinking. Interview With David Tonge of the Division: The Future Form of the Camera in technology main Category Understanding this is a concept-only at the moment, what do you ideally envision the technical specifications for this device? It’s a very haptic experience. As we get used to the swipe, pinch, and touch [interaction] on the smart phone, why not use the same gestures with a camera? Therefore we felt the external front lens of the camera should also be a haptic surface. The lens form is faceted in shape, giving your finger tips a reference point, a nod to the old days. A user would move their fingers around the lens to make adjustments – like to zoom or adjust the aperture – in the same way we do with most current cameras. The lens itself stays static and is non-removable.

…the external front lens of the camera should also be a haptic surface. The lens form is faceted in shape, giving your finger tips a reference point, a nod to the old days.

However, the touch sensitive surface display changes; the lens is like a mini array of individual displays arranged as facets. Each faceted area would not only display aperture settings, but also ISO or other user adjustments (colour, B&W, etc.); the user could preselect to be make adjustments using this lens interface versus the rear display. We imagine some people would use this haptic display lens to make adjustments, while others would be happy swiping and pinching on the rear display. Or maybe a combination of both, depending on the situation. The lens itself would be optically a 28-30 mm model – the classic reportage lens size. But it’s a concept, so no reason why we couldn’t imagine this couldn’t be a SLR type or 18-70 zoom lens either. Similarly, which materials would you use in construction?
Much the same as a high-end smart phone. Interview With David Tonge of the Division: The Future Form of the Camera in technology main Category Could you tell me more about the software/interface side of the envisioned user experience? As you can see from the concept images, its largely a mobile phone interface in terms of navigation. We envision a simple language suitable for a person with beginner-photography skills. But the device would also be switchable to prosumer-mode for those who want further controls. One crucial feature envisioned central to this design revolves around image filtering. Because we spend so much time trying to organise our data (and the data is getting bigger, thanks to HD resolution images), we want to have simple filter options available using the camera’s on-board capabilities. For example, we could create filter sets formulated not only by light conditions or subject, but also location: “London”, “People”, “Sunny”. We can rid of low-light and stabilize and compensate for user shaking, because the camera can recognize these parameters in realtime and make adjustments accordingly, while also making each of these features automatically or easily accessible. Because the photography industry still skews toward a specs-oriented market, camera makers build incredible sensors and smart systems to capture photographs, but seem to research less about the inverse: reviewing and filtering shots. This shortcoming is one reason I believe the camera manufacturers are suffering.

Interview With David Tonge of the Division: The Future Form of the Camera in technology main Category

The Division’s previous projects in other consumer mobile device design helped shape their latest exploratory concept. Their flexible e-ink displays above – Plastic Logic – was designed to be the “iPod of books”.

It seems the design shares many recognizable attributes with the Apple iPhone (or perhaps the Samsung Galaxy series) in form and function. But which digital cameras do you find inspiring/admirable in features currently on the market. What is their glaring deficiencies you hope to improve upon? I am a photography enthusiast myself and use Leica, Canon and Ricoh cameras. In addition, some of our clients are in the camera realm, so we are somewhat close to the industry, without disclosing too much. The camera’s shape is a result of the function, really. Lens on the front, screen on the back. We decided not to do the usual camera grips and surfaced form, because once you begin adding these features and the thickness which comes with them, it defeats the purpose. So, yes, it looks a bit like a phone with the exception of the haptic lens part, but I believe it’s an evocation of both the old and the new. If we were asked to develop this design further, then the form could move in a number of directions from here. Interview With David Tonge of the Division: The Future Form of the Camera in technology main Category As for current digital cameras, I use a Leica X2. It’s a fixed lens camera, so if you want to zoom you walk forward! Lens quality and colour are absolutely fabulous as you would expect from Leica. I also use a Ricoh GR – also has a fixed lens camera – but with an incredible macro-feature which allows me to get within a couple of centimeters from the object. Neither camera is loaded with features, but do the basic job brilliantly. What is lacking with both models though is their usability for a non-camera person. Leica has made some effort to fix this with the Leica T, however I think the T physically borrows too much from Apple. I believe Leica should be more radical in some way, but its capturing a demand for this kind of collectible tech gear. I do wonder how many photographers will be carrying it… Interview With David Tonge of the Division: The Future Form of the Camera in technology main Category The other cameras which I find interesting are made by Sigma. With a radical huge sensor, and a very strange but challenging form, their DP2 Quattro is an interesting camera I can appreciate. Also the current Ricoh Theta shoots 360 shots and is designed to work in conjunction with a smartphone…more of an accessory for a smartphone [than a traditional camera], like the endless health and other activity devices designed as iOS or Android peripherals. Apart from Canon and Nikon’s real pro and prosumer models, everyone else is looking for guidance. Which is why I believe the smartphone manufacturers are more likely to innovate ahead of traditional photography gear companies, and we will likely see the death of a few more high street camera manufacturers, just as we are seeing in the the PC business due to tablets… an inevitable end for all but the “smartest” camera makers. A special thanks to David Tonge and the Division for the interview and photos.






3 Charging Docks For the New iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus

3 Charging Docks For the New iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus After less than a week of using the iPhone 6 Plus I can confidently make three recommendations: 1. Get a case: You’ve likely already read or seen the video which ignited “Bendgate”, showing iPhone’s susceptibility to damage while in pockets. Options are slim right now (I went with Apple’s leather case), but almost any case will protect against bending when compared to a naked iPhone. 2. Apply a screen film: An extra layer like the Zagg Invisible Shield or Power Support Anti-Glare Film is a prudent investment against errant scratches. There’s a lot more screen real estate to connect with all sorts of sharp edges. 3. Invest in a charging dock
The first two recommendations may seem obvious when considering the long-term protection of a device with up to a 5.5″ screen, but the last might elicit a suspicious, “why?”.
3 Charging Docks For the New iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus in technology main Category

The team at Dock+ shared this photo of their peripheral accommodating for the larger sized iPhone 6 Plus model with ease.

I plan to always charge using a docking stand because of concerns about the screen’s larger size (keeping the device at an upright position reduces the chances of accidentally incurring a cracked screen) and also because of reports the new iPhones support faster 2.1-Amp charging. When connected to a newer model Mac or a higher current power plug, both new iPhones now draw in an extra 1600 mA of power compared to the base 500 mA fed by the standard USB module which ships with the phones. The problem of course is Apple hasn’t decided to offer their own compatible dock, and the current selection of Lightning docks are limited when editing out with design and stability in mind. I’ve picked the following three options – some actually originally designed for the iPad Air and iPad mini – all with a small, but stable base for charging and displaying the new phones safely, but with designs that complement Cupertino’s aesthetic: 3 Charging Docks For the New iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus in technology main Category 3 Charging Docks For the New iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus in technology main Category The Dock+: The original 2 lbs. of solid steel design Dock+ was already over-engineered for the iPhone 5 models, and it confidently accommodates for the wider and larger iPhone 6 models (as shown here). Each Dock+ is made in Boulder, Colorado and the non-branded design is available in both black and white. 3 Charging Docks For the New iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus in technology main Category The Lightning Dock: If you’re a disciple of the belief “less is more”, but still want a stable docking stand, this puck-shaped anodized brushed silver or black aluminum design hits both marks. And despite the smallest of the trio offered here, the Lighting Dock can even fit iPhones with cases thanks to an adjustable back support design. 3 Charging Docks For the New iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus in technology main Category Belkin Express Dock: Stable enough to hold up an iPad or iPad mini, Belkin’s charging dock’s design features a built-in 4-foot USB cable and is backed by a two-year limited warranty. The only qualms about the Express is the branding, which would have been more aesthetically pleasing placed at the back of the stand.






Reductive Designers: Sans Forms Refreshes Line

Reductive Designers: Sans Forms Refreshes Line Earlier this year a husband-and-wife team under the moniker of Sans Form assembled a stable of international graphic designers, all unified under a shared aesthetic reflecting the modern, minimalist, and typographic. Sans Form’s launch collection caught our eye the first time around, and now they’ve returned with a refreshed catalog of tees continuing the cross continental, Italy+California studio’s commitment to promoting reductive design in the form of wearables. Reductive Designers: Sans Forms Refreshes Line in style fashion main Category Reductive Designers: Sans Forms Refreshes Line in style fashion main Category Reductive Designers: Sans Forms Refreshes Line in style fashion main Category Reductive Designers: Sans Forms Refreshes Line in style fashion main Category Reductive Designers: Sans Forms Refreshes Line in style fashion main Category Reductive Designers: Sans Forms Refreshes Line in style fashion main Category Reductive Designers: Sans Forms Refreshes Line in style fashion main Category Reductive Designers: Sans Forms Refreshes Line in style fashion main Category Reductive Designers: Sans Forms Refreshes Line in style fashion main Category Reductive Designers: Sans Forms Refreshes Line in style fashion main Category Reductive Designers: Sans Forms Refreshes Line in style fashion main Category






Låmpion Hybrid Vacuum Tube Amplifer

Låmpion Hybrid Vacuum Tube Amplifer Barcelona based studio Stefan Radev & Partners recently dropped an eye-catching piece of audio equipment into our inbox. Designed for Danish audio brand, the Låmpion Hybrid Vacuum Tube Amplifer is a compact amplifier designed to work with an existing audio system or a standalone unit. Låmpion Hybrid Vacuum Tube Amplifer in technology main Category Låmpion Hybrid Vacuum Tube Amplifer in technology main Category A tasteful combination of wood and aluminum swathe from front to back, hints of automotive detailing evident in the curved perforated matte metal bottom-sides and top, all providing airflow to cool the 20+20 watt amplifier’s circuitry. Topped with twin vacuum tubes and two-dial control (check out the dual hand analog balance), the design’s RCA 845 custom tubes (both protected under glass) are engineered to produce both a warmer sound while soothing the nostalgic audiophile pangs of analog days gone by. Just don’t mistake the Låmpion Hybrid Vacuum Tube Amplifer as a complete retro device: the amp is engineered to satisfy the digital needs of today with streaming wi-fi audio, micro-USB and Lightning connectors, and iOS and Android compatibility. Låmpion Hybrid Vacuum Tube Amplifer in technology main Category Låmpion Hybrid Vacuum Tube Amplifer in technology main Category Låmpion Hybrid Vacuum Tube Amplifer in technology main Category






The Panasonic Lumix CM1 Blurs Line Between Camera and Smartphone

The Panasonic Lumix CM1 Blurs Line Between Camera and Smartphone The question you’re left pondering upon first being presented with the LUMIX CM1′s design and specs list – with its giant 1″ 20-megapixel sensor and Leica lens – is whether Panasonic has created a devilishly thin digital camera with smartphone capabilities, or whether they’ve crammed a capable Android smartphone with astounding digital photography features? Whichever the case, the Panasonic Lumix CM1 unveiled at Photokina 2014 acknowledges and solidifies the convergence between categories. Inside the retro-styled body a 1″ MOS sensor similar to those used inside Olympus and Leica’s Four Thirds System cameras is partnered with a manual focus ring 28mm f/2.8 Leica lens. This means the CM1 is capable of capturing 4K video and RAW video files. Despite the Lumix CM1′s camera body shape – complete with a textured synthetic leather back further selling its retro cred –  the unit’s 21mm thickness means a viewfinder was an impossibility (for comparison, the Samsung Galaxy S5 is 8.1mm in thickness). Instead, a 4.7-inch 1080p screen allows for framing and image review, while Android 4.4 KitKat handles all smartphone features, relying upon the 2.3GHz quad-core Snapdragon processor and 2GB of RAM for what should offer sufficiently snappy performance. The CM1 ships with only 16GB of onboard storage (and disappointingly only a modest 2,600mAh battery), but a microSD card slot means storage can be expanded with additional 128GB and switched out whenever needed. The Panasonic Lumix CM1 Blurs Line Between Camera and Smartphone in technology main Category The Panasonic Lumix CM1 Blurs Line Between Camera and Smartphone in technology main Category
The Panasonic Lumix CM1 Blurs Line Between Camera and Smartphone in technology main Category

The cursive “L” at the bottom corner denotes the f/2.8 Leica DC Elmarit lens attached to the CM1′s “slim for a camera” / “chubby for a smartphone” body. One is left imagining a design which would allow the pancake style lens to be switched out.

The Panasonic Lumix CM1 Blurs Line Between Camera and Smartphone in technology main Category The Panasonic Lumix CM1 Blurs Line Between Camera and Smartphone in technology main Category With all good news comes some bad news: Panasonic plans to only release the Lumix CM1 initially in France and Germany in December for an estimated 900 euros (about $1,164), test markets before the possibility this very tempting design arrives stateside some time in 2015.






The Safari TV Cardboard iPad Stand

The Safari TV Cardboard iPad Stand It’s amusing to notice as much as we progress technologically, there always seems to be a place for that most humble of materials, cardboard. Just recently Google gave away hundreds of cardboard VR viewers to 2014 Google I/O attendees to fold into a “no-frills enclosure that transforms a phone into a basic VR headset” to use with an accompanying open software toolkit. Pillar, “the lightest portable notebook computer stand”, also made of fluted cardboard (coated with a durable polypropylene finish), met their Kickstarter funding goals, yet another example of cardboard’s enduring appeal. The Safari TV Cardboard iPad Stand in technology main Category Cardboard’s durable, yet easily disposable nature also makes it a prime material for combining kids and technology. Partner the foldable fun of constructing with cardboard with a dose of retro technology design, and you’ve got the Cardboard Safari Crew’s Safari TV Cardboard iPad Stand. The recycled cardboard iPad stand’s pre-remote control boob tube design allows access to the iPad’s Home button, FaceTime camera, USB connector, headphone jack, and volume control, and could easily be customized with a little artistic license using paint or markers if the kids want to customize their iPad “television” without damaging the tablet itself. If the Safari becomes victim to irreparable damage, no biggie…tear it up and throw it into the compost or recycling bin. If only all of our outdated devices were so easy to dispose of… The Safari TV Cardboard iPad Stand in technology main Category The Safari TV Cardboard iPad Stand in technology main Category






The Internet of Things Simplified Into One Red bttn

The Internet of Things Simplified Into One Red bttn It wouldn’t be unfair if you assumed the designers of the bttn were inspired by the office stress relief accessory found at a popular home office store, such is their uncanny resemblance. But unlike its “dumb” cousin, the bttn has been engineered to do something beyond illuminate and dissipate stress via button bashing: designer Harri Koskinen’s simplified unified interface is connected wirelessly to several cloud-based services and activities. In simplest terms, this big red button is a gigantic user configurable “ON+Send” button which triggers countless customized actions via wi-fi, SMS, or from your mobile device, connecting the home to internet services/technologies like “HTTP, RSS, IFTTT, SmartThings, Twitter, Facebook, email, or SMS messaging”. For example, the bttn could be used as an easy one button interface for senior citizens to turn on/off all the lights, television, and any other appliance easily from their bedside while sending a quick “goodnight” to their children so they know everything is okay. Or when connected to a wi-fi enabled security camera system, bttn could operate both as door chime and automated photo identification system, delivering a snapshot via email or SMS. Several more automation “recipes” are illustrated here to further explain the possibilities.
The Internet of Things Simplified Into One Red bttn in technology main Category

Connected to a home automation and security system, the bttn could operate as the easiest “on” switch. Because bttn doesn’t require swiping or turning on any device to work, its simple interface could prove especially helpful in emergencies or amongst the elderly.

The Internet of Things Simplified Into One Red bttn in technology main Category The Internet of Things Simplified Into One Red bttn in technology main Category Once connected to a home’s Wi-Fi or a mobile data network, the almost 4″ diameter AA battery operated device can be customized using a wizard application into infinite combinations of “do this, this, and that”, notifying users with a simple color-coded system: “Flashing GREEN top means successful completion of the trigger, RED means error, and a circling YELLOW means wait.” Only time will tell if the simplified one-button utility of the device will veer adopters toward simplicity in an era of specs, features, and “more is more” devices…especially when competing with more tempting automation solutions.






Furtif Evercut Knives Only Need Sharpening Once Every 25 Years

Furtif Evercut Knives Only Need Sharpening Once Every 25 Years Today the term “technology” is primarily defined by electronic devices. But there’s another aspect of technology which plays a significant role in modern design: the material manipulation and viable forms now at the disposal of designers using technology. Technological tools like 3D modeling, 3D printing, and computer modern manufacturing processes means designers can now explore forms and functions to redefine nearly any object…even something as basic as a knife. Furtif Evercut Knives Only Need Sharpening Once Every 25 Years in technology main Category The TB Groupe, one of France’s established knife makers based in Thiers, carries a history of five generations dedicated to the manufacturing knives. Their latest design, the FURTIF Evercut collection is the culmination of the company’s exploration of new materials and forms, a sharp edged stealth bomber of faceted geometry constructed using titanium carbide laser bonding to strengthen a blade of stainless steel. Furtif Evercut Knives Only Need Sharpening Once Every 25 Years in technology main Category Furtif Evercut Knives Only Need Sharpening Once Every 25 Years in technology main Category Furtif Evercut Knives Only Need Sharpening Once Every 25 Years in technology main Category Furtif Evercut Knives Only Need Sharpening Once Every 25 Years in technology main Category The blade’s durability is strengthened even further using machines to apply thousands of pounds per square inch (imagine carbon being pressed into a diamond), the knife exiting the process with a finish 300x stronger than a standard steel blade. All that pressure and care results in kitchen knives that can go 25 years between professional sharpening. That’s a lifetime of tomatoes and onions diced. Furtif Evercut Knives Only Need Sharpening Once Every 25 Years in technology main Category The knives unique character is further enhanced with its own individual code number lasered onto the surface, allowing owners to register their device…ahem…knife just like a new iPhone. The FURTIF Evercut collection, comprised of a Pairing Knife, Kitchen Knife, Santoku Knife and Chef’s Knife, are available domestically here (the office knife style is available here).






Apple Watch Sports Custom Typeface For Maximum Legibility

Apple Watch Sports Custom Typeface For Maximum Legibility The Apple Watch released this Tuesday marks the Cupertino company’s formal foray into tech wearables, and many keen-eyed design – pardon the pun – watchers noticed alongside the hardware announcement Apple also unveiled a completely new typeface designed specifically to complement the screens of their new digital timepieces. Apple Watch Sports Custom Typeface For Maximum Legibility in technology style fashion main Category There’s been a lot of reshuffling in Apple’s alpha-numeric toolbox lately, with Helvetica Neue replacing Helvetica in iOS and Lucida Grande switched out for Helvetica Neue for the upcoming release of OS X Yosemite. For their new wearable technology Apple’s design team recognized the need for a flexible weight and legible san serif typeface offering maximum quick-glance legibility demanding minimal effort on the viewer’s part when using a 38mm-42mm screen (a.k.a. the squint factor). The resulting yet-to-be-named typeface shares some characteristics with an existing font family, Process Type Foundry’s Colfax [PDF] (perhaps alongside Univers and DIN), but the foundry notes it is not the same font and in comparison, Apple’s characters are taller.
Apple Watch Sports Custom Typeface For Maximum Legibility in technology style fashion main Category

Google’s Roboto typeface was also optimized for small screen legibility and there are some notable similarities between the Android san serif and Apple’s latest font.

Apple Watch Sports Custom Typeface For Maximum Legibility in technology style fashion main Category The typography set is already debating the myriad of merits and misses of the fresh new fonts, but you can be sure Apple’s internal design team will continually fine-tune their custom font with the evolution of their devices’ Retina displays. Now if we can just get an official name…
Apple Watch Sports Custom Typeface For Maximum Legibility in technology style fashion main Category

Designed by Eric Olson in 2012 for Process Type Foundry, Colfax is an oval sans serif influenced by the Aurora Grotesk series and Neuzeit, a typeface designed by C.W. Pischiner for the Stempel foundry in 1928. Similarities between Colfax and the Apple Watch font can be made in comparison, above and below.

Apple Watch Sports Custom Typeface For Maximum Legibility in technology style fashion main Category






16 Years In the Making: The Dyson 360 Eye Robot Vacuum

16 Years In the Making: The Dyson 360 Eye Robot Vacuum James Dyson is not one to rest on his knighted laurels. Already synonymous with innovation in the vacuum market, it should come as no surprise Dyson has long had his eyes on integrating navigation into an autonomous robot form. In fact, his team has been tinkering for 16 years. Thanks to some technological leaps, Dyson is finally ready to release the company’s first fully robotic vacuum: the Dyson 360 Eye. The newly unveiled Dyson 360 Eye robot vacuum cleaner is the net result of improving two shortcomings hampering existing robot vacuums: navigation and suction power. Firstly, the 360 Eye improves navigation with Dyson Digital Algebra, a 360-degree camera system and algorithm programmed to snap 30 photos per second to stitch together a live map of a surrounding environment. Partnered with infrared sensors to “see” smaller hazards in the vacuums way, the 360 Eye is spatially aware of its surrounding, whether it be furnishings, pets, or humans in its path, eliminating the “bump and go” pathway behavior of other autonomous vacs. 16 Years In the Making: The Dyson 360 Eye Robot Vacuum in technology main Category 16 Years In the Making: The Dyson 360 Eye Robot Vacuum in technology main Category But an improved navigation system wasn’t enough for Dyson to feel confident entering the ever crowded robot cleaning device category. Dyson also wanted to improve the overall suction performance and capacity of the robotic vacuum design, noting most existing models can only marginally tidy up a floor, rather than truly clean debris with the same veracity of a powerful handheld or small canister vacuum. The V2 Dyson digital motor markedly improves performance, capable of a whirlwind 104,000 rpm of suction power. A 2-layer soft+hard carbon fiber bristle sweeper handles low pile carpeting and hard floors, while rugged tank treads allows the robot to do a serviceable impersonation of the Mars Rover. 16 Years In the Making: The Dyson 360 Eye Robot Vacuum in technology main Category 16 Years In the Making: The Dyson 360 Eye Robot Vacuum in technology main Category The final component of the Dyson 360 Eye is a Dyson Link, an iOS and Android compatible functionality app. Users can review maps created by the Dyson Digital Algebra’s optical 360-degree camera, alongside manage scheduling. 16 Years In the Making: The Dyson 360 Eye Robot Vacuum in technology main Category 16 Years In the Making: The Dyson 360 Eye Robot Vacuum in technology main Category The Dyson 360 Eye will first go on sale in Japan next spring 2014, then worldwide afterward. No price available yet, but expect the Dyson Wall-E…ahem…360 Eye, to be priced somewhere in the same zip code as the best iRobot Roomba.