10 Exuberant Will Alsop Works

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Courtesy of aLL Design Courtesy of aLL Design

The late British architect Will Alsop was noted for his exuberant and irreverent attitude that took material form in his expressive, painterly portfolio of educational, civic, and residential works. At the ripe age of 23, he was awarded second place in the 1971 Centre Georges Pompidou. From there, he went on to work for the ever humorous Cedric Price before establishing his practice with John Lyall, and eventually many others, in the early 1980s. With a career spanning almost fifty years, here are ten iconic works from an architect who never missed an opportunity to play.

Sharp Centre for Design / 2004

© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ontario_College_of_Art_and_Design.png'>Wikimedia user April Hickox</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ontario_College_of_Art_and_Design.png'>Wikimedia user April Hickox</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>

Completed in 2004 and housing the Ontario College of Art and Design University’s Faculty of Design, the floating volume towers over the university’s historic structure—seemingly dancing

Courtesy of aLL Design
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/asalisz/7425231462/'>Flickr user Artur Salisz</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY NC 2.0</a>
Courtesy of aLL Design
Courtesy of aLL Design
Courtesy of aLL Design
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/martinrp/2050226763/in/photolist-7bJgXf-4bZjLv-vkqYwG-vwTmuf-7UnqWA-vxnBAq-vie1J4-48aWZi-vkjQNu-vfRK4j-uAdUwL-vfCWQG-J2vHiz-J2vEZg-J2vJwr-J2vFTk-J2udAh-J2vEfv-J2uoWN-J2udid-J2vLEe-JUUtuo-J2vGXe-uFbGwr-vqMCWu-uLwHyX-vqV7rK-Ah7mAH-vqMws7-vqUDyX-J2vJQx-vA3z5i-vwTyxJ-vxr4tF-vfCQuq'>Flickr user .Martin.</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/coltgroup/5209432852/in/photolist-ayZtuA-cYrxk7-8VURkk-8WkGX9-8WhD38-9rkJLF-8Wi1fe-8WkGTN-9riQ7-cYrwnY-N3Wf7-ewBHu3-dWG6X1-qoDom-ayWNvR-9riQ6-ppLz4z-dWG7bh-cYrwKN-a5KRUs-a5GYjD-a5GXxB-5R7kk'>Flickr user Colt International Limited</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/wojtekgurak/15822673099/'>Flickr user Wojtek Gurak</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Courtesy of aLL Design
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Love in Las Vegas: 99% Invisible Illuminates Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown’s Postmodern Romance

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© <a href='https://www.publicdomainpictures.net/en/view-image.php?image=223416&picture=las-vegas-at-night'>Public Domain user Jean Beaufort</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/'>CC0 Public Domain</a> © <a href='https://www.publicdomainpictures.net/en/view-image.php?image=223416&picture=las-vegas-at-night'>Public Domain user Jean Beaufort</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/'>CC0 Public Domain</a>

Which building is better, the duck or the ornamented shed? More importantly, what kind of architecture does the average American prefer? In their landmark 1972 publication Learning From Las Vegas, Denise Scott Brown and Robert Venturi probed these questions by turning their back on paternalistic modernism in favor of the glowing, overtly kitsch, and symbolic Mecca of the Las Vegas strip. From a chance encounter during a meeting in the Library of Fine Arts at the University of Pennsylvania and shared trips to the strip to critically shaping a new generation of architects, discover the hidden details of the romance and city that defined postmodernism in this latest episode from 99% Invisible

Following a clandestine interaction following a meeting to discuss the destruction of the 1890 Library of Fine

© Robert Venturi
© Denise Scott Brown
© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Big_Duck.JPG'>Wikimedia user Beth Savage</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
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AD Classics: Arts United Center / Louis Kahn

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© Jeffery Johnson © Jeffery Johnson

In 1961, the architect Louis I. Kahn was commissioned by the Fine Arts Foundation to design and develop a large arts complex in central Fort Wayne, Indiana. The ambitious Fine Art Center, now known as the Arts United Center, would cater to the community of 180,000 by providing space for an orchestra, theatre, school, gallery, and much more. As a Lincoln Center in miniature, the developers had hoped to update and upgrade the city through new civic architecture. However, due to budget constraints, only a fraction of the overall scheme was completed. It is one of Kahn’s lesser-known projects that spanned over a decade, and his only building in the Midwest. 

© Jeffery Johnson © Jeffery Johnson

Kahn’s original proposal encompassed a philharmonic hall, art school, gallery and civic theatre bound together in a large complex. Yet, troubles began early in the project as the architect’s 20 million dollar

© Jeffery Johnson
© Jeffery Johnson
© Jeffery Johnson
© Jeffery Johnson
© Jeffery Johnson
© Jeffery Johnson
© Jeffery Johnson
Plan
Exterior Elevations
Sections
Sections
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City of Los Angeles Appoints Inaugural Chief Design Officer

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© <a href=‘https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Att_building_LA.jpg'>Wikimedia user KennethHan</a>  licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a> © <a href=‘https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Att_building_LA.jpg'>Wikimedia user KennethHan</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>

Recently, long-standing architecture critic for the LA Times Christopher Hawthorne announced that he was stepping down to take up the position of chief design officer for the City of Los Angeles in Mayor Eric Garcetti’s administration. According to Hawthorne, the role will involve raising “the quality of public architecture and urban design across the city — and the level of civic conversation about those subjects.” This dramatic shift from the question: what is the role of the critic and architecture criticism in shaping civic architecture?

Hawthorne has noted that his position will take on a variety of public exercises. Design competitions, public forums, campaigns, engagement with emerging architects, and supporting zone changing will all fall under his careful guidance. Ultimately, Hawthorne will function as a guardian and champion of quality architecture and 

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Moshe Safdie Discusses His Unbuilt Work and Timeless Meaning In Architecture

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While Moshe Safdie may be more well known for the bold forms defining his portfolio of built projects—ranging from the National Gallery of Canada and the horizontal Raffles City Chongqing to the iconic Habitat 67—the architect considers his unbuilt works as important, if not more. Safdie ponders the role of these projects and more in PLANE-SITE’s latest addition to the series Time-Space-Existence.

Courtesy of PLANE-SITE Courtesy of PLANE-SITE

“For those who design in order to build, not succeeding in building is not a failure,” Safdie says. “There are different reasons that things don’t get built but they form a fascinating track through one’s thoughts and career. When I review that unbuilt work, some of it is the most significant work I’ve done.”

Courtesy of PLANE-SITE Courtesy of PLANE-SITE
Courtesy of PLANE-SITE Courtesy of PLANE-SITE

In the short film, he contemplates the lineage of Habitat 67. He notes that the iteration in Montreal, which still stands today,

Courtesy of PLANE-SITE
Courtesy of PLANE-SITE
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Modular Installation Provides Temporary Housing For Refugees Beneath Paris Bridge

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Courtesy of 1week1project Courtesy of 1week1project

As hundreds of refugees continue to arrive in Paris, France, the city faces an ongoing struggle to find safe and suitable housing for the influx of migrants. As a result, many end up sleeping in underused urban spaces or on the side of the road with almost no access to water, sanitation, and food.

In response, Paris- and Santiago-based firm 1week1project unveil their design for a speculative public park titled “Illuminate Paris!” beneath an elevated railway bridge to provide additional support for organizations handling the influx of refugees. This modular “field of experiences” features a series of lantern-like environments forming a canopy along the underside of the bridge that allows for much-need space for migrants who are currently forced to sleep in encampments under similar infrastructure and in parks.

Courtesy of 1week1project Courtesy of 1week1project
Courtesy of 1week1project Courtesy of 1week1project

The project not only provides temporary accommodation

Courtesy of 1week1project
Courtesy of 1week1project
Courtesy of 1week1project
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This Instagram Account Collects Hilarious Construction Fails and Home Improvement Disasters

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We’ve all seen them: cringeworthy designs and abysmal construction fails. For architects and designers, it's difficult not to hone in on the details of every space we encounter. And, it’s even harder not to laugh at doors incapable of opening, plaster jobs that could have been completed by a 4-year old, and an overly liberal use of caulking to solve any construction mishap. 

Inspired by this guilty pleasure, the Instagram account of “Certified Caulk Installer” Trevor Lahey aka greaseball1987 has collected the best of the worst home improvement disasters for your viewing pleasure. See more of Lahey's plethora of hilarious tragedies below.

Quick lockset replacement this morning. I love when all the old hardware fits in the old mortise. I didn't even have to bring my gun to site! #winning #replacement #perfectfit #contractor #contracting #contractorsofinsta #handyman #carpenter #keepcraftalive #mortise #handle #reno #renovation #instahome #upscale #doorlatch #tradesman #trades #craftsmanship #craftsman

Continue reading "This Instagram Account Collects Hilarious Construction Fails and Home Improvement Disasters"

This Instagram Account Collects Hilarious Construction Fails and Home Improvement Disasters

    <figure>

We’ve all seen them: cringeworthy designs and abysmal construction fails. For architects and designers, it's difficult not to hone in on the details of every space we encounter. And, it’s even harder not to laugh at doors incapable of opening, plaster jobs that could have been completed by a 4-year old, and an overly liberal use of caulking to solve any construction mishap. 

Inspired by this guilty pleasure, the Instagram account of “Certified Caulk Installer” Trevor Lahey aka greaseball1987 has collected the best of the worst home improvement disasters for your viewing pleasure. See more of Lahey's plethora of hilarious tragedies below.

Quick lockset replacement this morning. I love when all the old hardware fits in the old mortise. I didn't even have to bring my gun to site! #winning #replacement #perfectfit #contractor #contracting #contractorsofinsta #handyman #carpenter #keepcraftalive #mortise #handle #reno #renovation #instahome #upscale #doorlatch #tradesman #trades #craftsmanship #craftsman

Continue reading "This Instagram Account Collects Hilarious Construction Fails and Home Improvement Disasters"

Amanda Levete Architects Unveil Oxford University Addition

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Courtesy of AL_A Architects Courtesy of AL_A Architects

London-based AL_A, spearheaded by Amanda Levete, have revealed their design for two new buildings at the Wadham College site of the historic Oxford University in England. The Dr. Lee Shau Kee Building and William Doo Undergraduate Centre will provide much-needed space for undergraduate services to support the University's access programs as well as new gathering places for the student body. The firm has been developing the expansion since securing the project after an invited design competition in the summer of 2016.

Courtesy of AL_A Architects Courtesy of AL_A Architects

Though connected, each addition will function as a distinct beacon at the core of the campus. The Dr. Lee Shau Kee Building will house the Wadham College’s access and outreach programs, offering spaces for hosting schools. The building will also feature student accommodations, a music room, and public lecture space. Intended to be the “heart of the student

Courtesy of AL_A Architects
Courtesy of AL_A Architects
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99% Invisible Investigates the Utopian and Dystopian Histories of the Bijlmermeer

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© <a href=‘https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Janericloebe'>Wikimedia user Janericloebe</a>licensed under<a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en/'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> © <a href=‘https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Janericloebe'>Wikimedia user Janericloebe</a>licensed under<a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en/'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>

How can we plan a better city? The answer has confounded architects and urban planners since the birth of the industrial city. One attempt at answering came in the form of a spectacular modernist proposal outside of Amsterdam called the Bijlmermeer. And, as a new two-part episode by 99% Invisible reveals, it failed miserably. But, like all histories, the story is not as simple as it first appears. 

In the post-war landscape of Europe, architects were provided with a platform to re-design cities from the ground up—linear, open, clean, and everything in its proper place. Thus the hexagonal-shaped scheme of the 6 square kilometer project separated actives and functions into their respective zones, restricting living to the sky and activity to the ground. The utopian and egalitarian ideals quickly dissolved as services drastically lagged

Continue reading "99% Invisible Investigates the Utopian and Dystopian Histories of the Bijlmermeer"

Sou Fujimoto and Coldefy & Associés Propose a Sweeping Canopy for French Court House

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Courtesy of MIR Courtesy of MIR

Sou Fujimoto and Coldefy & Associés Architects Urban Planners’ proposal for a pale sweeping canopy enclosing a stacked glazed volume was among the four finalists for the new Palais de justice in LilleFrance organized by the Public Agency for Justice’s Real Estate (APIJ). Though the competition drew 139 international proposals, from which OMA was ultimately selected, Fujimoto and Coldefy & Associés' graceful structure was designed to house the high and district courts as well as public spaces within a facility in dialogue with its natural surroundings. 

See the full proposal below.

Courtesy of MIR Courtesy of MIR
Courtesy of MIR Courtesy of MIR
Courtesy of MIR Courtesy of MIR
Courtesy of MIR Courtesy of MIR

Located in a relatively vast site on the outskirts of the city adjacent to a recreational facility, motorways, and the historic fabric of Lille, the five-story courthouse was conceived to promote a greater relationship with the surrounding community.

Courtesy of MIR
Courtesy of MIR
Courtesy of MIR
Courtesy of MIR
Courtesy of MIR
Continue reading "Sou Fujimoto and Coldefy & Associés Propose a Sweeping Canopy for French Court House"

Aedas Unveil Design for an Undulating Office Complex in Central China

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Courtesy of Aedas Courtesy of Aedas

The internationally recognized architecture firm Aedas has unveiled their design for the Zhenghong Property Air Harbour Office Project. The sprawling and interconnected 196 foot-tall three-tower complex is proposed for the city of Zhengzhou, the capital of the Henan Province in central China—one of the regions' largest transportation hubs. Occupying a relatively narrow site, the towers are woven together by a rhythmic glass facade inspired by the formal qualities of the winding Yellow River. 

Courtesy of Aedas Courtesy of Aedas

The porous, organic design offers improved circulation and air movement to transform the large-scale development into an active vertical urban space. These undulating forms are carried through in the surrounding public plazas, green space, and the geometry of the vertical structures themselves. The softened diamond-shaped central tower is flanked by two rectilinear blocks angled at 45 degrees to offer vistas south toward residential developments surrounding the complex

Courtesy of Aedas
Courtesy of Aedas
Courtesy of Aedas
Continue reading "Aedas Unveil Design for an Undulating Office Complex in Central China"

Aedas Unveil Design for an Undulating Office Complex in Central China

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Courtesy of Aedas Courtesy of Aedas

The internationally recognized architecture firm Aedas has unveiled their design for the Zhenghong Property Air Harbour Office Project. The sprawling and interconnected 196 foot-tall three-tower complex is proposed for the city of Zhengzhou, the capital of the Henan Province in central China—one of the regions' largest transportation hubs. Occupying a relatively narrow site, the towers are woven together by a rhythmic glass facade inspired by the formal qualities of the winding Yellow River. 

Courtesy of Aedas Courtesy of Aedas

The porous, organic design offers improved circulation and air movement to transform the large-scale development into an active vertical urban space. These undulating forms are carried through in the surrounding public plazas, green space, and the geometry of the vertical structures themselves. The softened diamond-shaped central tower is flanked by two rectilinear blocks angled at 45 degrees to offer vistas south toward residential developments surrounding the complex

Courtesy of Aedas
Courtesy of Aedas
Courtesy of Aedas
Continue reading "Aedas Unveil Design for an Undulating Office Complex in Central China"

This Medieval Town is Built Inside a Crater and Composed of Millions of Diamonds

    <figure>
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/120282578@N03/13137177895/'>Flickr user Laurent Bernier</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a> © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/120282578@N03/13137177895/'>Flickr user Laurent Bernier</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>

From the greystone of Montreal to the limestone of Jerusalem, every city has its own iconic identity read through the city’s urban fabric. Scanning the architecture of the 1,110-year-old German town of Nördlingen, the timber frame homes, red pitched roofs, and winding streets appear identical in almost every regard to many quaint medieval communities populating the European countryside. 

While the town’s appearance in the 1971 classic Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory may seem like its most notable claim, there is something entirely unique about the architecture of this south German locale. Nördlingen is literally made of diamonds—millions of microscopic diamonds to be exact—with the town itself constructed within an ancient impact crater.

© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/24736216@N07/6269270534'>Flickr user Roger W</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a> © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/24736216@N07/6269270534'>Flickr user Roger W</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>

© <a href=‘https://pixabay.com/en/n%C3%B6rdlingen-city-homes-truss-2243883/'>Pixbay user FelixMittermeier</a> licensed under <a href=‘https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/deed.en'>CC0 1.0</a>
© <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/zongo/4078784460/in/photolist-7dqQw1-7dmYoK-7dmYk4-5sNMCf-5sJnrn-5sJnGD-5sNMmQ-5sJnnv-5sJnC2-CEVDF-ojYHUy-nfgVVk-nfi7Zc-nfgY8r-nyyb4X-nwuapt-5G2SB6-oBc8M6-ojYDUa-nwwx11-nyyj8n-ojYURo-oBrM17-CEVDK-oBcBRH-ojYRaL-5G7997-5G2SzT-nSu3W2-nyxH9e-5G2SEr-oDeBgF-cqSjns-ezoZ8J-cqShRC-cqSiaq-nwuxd8-nwNqTw-5G79gb-oBcNqZ-p9LmXS-FUJNFa-nyyMqi-nUB4DM-nT2Azu-oQewXT-nwPeBb-oBtD1t-nFjgps-CEVDT/'>Flickr user DAVID HOLT</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
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Collection Meters Look to Help Curb LA’s Homelessness Epidemic With Spare Change

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The Downtown Los Angeles meters will resemble those installed in Pasadena. Image via Curbed LA The Downtown Los Angeles meters will resemble those installed in Pasadena. Image via Curbed LA

Homelessness is a pressing issue faced by many cities across the globe. But, could the logistics of parking potentially assist in alleviating this epidemic by supporting community-based initiatives?

In Los Angeles County, where an estimated 58,000 people are homeless, city and county officials recently released six meters designed in collaboration between community advocacy organization the Flintridge Centre and the office of City Council member Jose Huizar to collect charitable contributions as opposed to parking fairs.

The bright orange collection meters, almost identical to their parking counterparts, will be situated in Downtown LA: two currently located in Grand Park with the remaining four to be installed around the El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historic Monument. To prevent confusion with existing meters, the new designs will be set back from the street and accept both credit

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DFA Unveil Speculative Proposal for a Mixed-Use District on New York’s Pier 40

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Courtesy of DFA Courtesy of DFA

Multidisciplinary firm DFA unveil their vision for the future of New York City's Pier 40, re-imagined as an innovative mixed-use district of commerce, recreation, and affordable housing. The self-initiated proposal by the New York-based studio would transform the existing 15-acre pier by revitalizing deteriorating infrastructure while maintaining the popular recreation area and soccer field on the site. 

Courtesy of DFA Courtesy of DFA

To frame the pier’s current recreational use, DFA imagines four tower typologies that would disperse housing across the site to reduce overall density and address the city-wide concern for affordable housing. 19 residential towers will accommodate 450 units and five residence types across 11 tower clusters that will range in height from 96 to 455 feet. An algorithm was employed to determine the optimal positioning of each tower typology turning Pier 40 into a “foundation for a new community.”

Courtesy of DFA Courtesy of DFA

We see

Courtesy of DFA
Courtesy of DFA
Courtesy of DFA
Courtesy of DFA
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Dorte Mandrup Wins Competition to Construct Heritage Center Atop a WWII Bunker 

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© Mir © Mir

Danish firm Dorte Mandrup A/S has been announced as the winners of a competition to design the new Trilateral Wadden Sea World Heritage Partnership Center on a historic UNESCO naval site in Wilhelmshaven, Germany. Selected from 14 entires, the firm’s winning proposal will seemingly float atop an existing World War II bunker and house the offices of a joint Danish, German and Netherlandish corporation working to protect the Wadden Sea area.

In the mid-1850s, this area of the Wadden Sea—an expansive intertidal ecosystem of shallow waters, wetlands, and tidal flats that provide a key habitat for migratory birds—was slowly developed into a naval harbor. Following the Second World War, the site was decommissioned and has since served cursory functions to the German Navy. As the conservation area was inscribed into the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2009, the concept limits the amount of land and resources used by developing above

© Mir
© Mir
Continue reading "Dorte Mandrup Wins Competition to Construct Heritage Center Atop a WWII Bunker "

4 Tiny Houses Selected as Winners in the Ryterna modul Architectural Challenge 2018

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Winning Proposals from the Architectural Challenge 2018: Tiny House. Image Courtesy of Ryterna modul  Winning Proposals from the Architectural Challenge 2018: Tiny House. Image Courtesy of Ryterna modul 

European modular container and building producer Ryterna modul has announced the winners of their fourth International competition: Architectural Challenge 2018 Tiny House. The competition asked for the design of a home for two people no larger than 25 square meters that integrated a kitchen, bathroom, living room, and sleeping area into a cohesive environment. With 150 projects from 88 countries, the three winning solutions and one honorable mention turn micro dwelling into a luxury.

See all the winning entries below.

First Prize: Wave House / Abdolrahman Kadkhodasalehi

First Prize:Wave House by Abdolrahman Kadkhodasalehi. Image Courtesy of Ryterna modul  First Prize:Wave House by Abdolrahman Kadkhodasalehi. Image Courtesy of Ryterna modul 

Office-BAO founder Abdolrahman Kadkhodasalehi took first prize with his winning scheme Wave House, a semi-circular structure that appears to dance on its minimal foundations. ”The main purpose of this project is to use the blessings which nature provides for us

Second Prize: Torii House by Julia Kaptur and Stas Kaptur. Image Courtesy of Ryterna modul 
Third Prize: Trapezoidal Mod by William Samin. Image Courtesy of Ryterna modul 
Honorable Mention: Project ATN by Clarence Zichen Qian. Image Courtesy of Ryterna modul 
Continue reading "4 Tiny Houses Selected as Winners in the Ryterna modul Architectural Challenge 2018"

Istanbul’s Futuristic KCTV Telecom Tower Nears Completion

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via https://www.sabah.com.tr/ via https://www.sabah.com.tr/

Construction continues on the undulating, futuristic 365 meter-tall Küçük Çamlıca TV (KCTV) Tower in Istanbul, Turkey. The new telecommunications tower will replace several drab structures currently in use and support an estimated 125 broadcasting transmitters—becoming the tallest edifice in the city.

Featuring restaurants, exhibition spaces, meeting areas, a panoramic elevator, and a two-story observation deck looking out over the Bosphorus Strait, the new landmark structure is expected to draw an estimated 4.5 million visitors annually. The £36 million tower will be topped with 145-meter steel mast supported by a 220-meter concrete core which, as of early February, has reached 153 meters of construction.

While wind testing was employed to confirm the monumental structure’s overall stability, it was also used by London-based engineering and facade consultants Newtecnic. This testing allowed the firm, whose previous projects include the cladding of Zaha Hadid Architect’s Heydar Aliyev

KCTV Tower shown 15 years in the future with drones carrying out routine checks and cleaning. Image Courtesy of Newtecnic
Continue reading "Istanbul’s Futuristic KCTV Telecom Tower Nears Completion"