Rare Footage Reflects the Complications of Construction of Early Skyscrapers

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This silent film, ‘The Skyscrapers of New York’ bears rare footage of the construction of a skyscraper from over one hundred years ago, shared by the Library of Congress as part of their ‘Early Films of New York’ collection. The first scenes include real work crews and the early construction methods that made the first skyscrapers possible; the steel framework the men can be seen clinging onto was a technical innovation that provided the strength and stability for buildings to be built over twenty floors high. It is startling to imagine their lack of concern for health and safety as the men are pictured dangling off a crane line in the sky.  The melodrama adopts the dramatic portrayal and larger than life acting of a silent film, depicting the foregone culture of public fisticuffs and disparaging ethnic attitudes from over a century ago. Weaved with the actual
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Studio Libeskind’s Military Museum Through the Lens of Alexandra Timpau

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© Alexandra Timpau © Alexandra Timpau The complications of war and violence demanded a bold piece of architecture to provoke the public's understanding of the impact it had on GermanyDaniel Libeskind chooses to engage with such events in his extension to Dresden's Military History Museum, by crashing a huge steel and concrete structure through the neoclassical facade, tearing apart the symmetry of the original building. Photographer Alexandra Timpau has captured the sharp edges and harsh angles of the museum's extension that convey the pain and the stark reality of war Libeskind and the museum refer to.
© Alexandra Timpau © Alexandra Timpau

I wanted to create a bold interruption, a fundamental dislocation, to penetrate the historic arsenal and create a new experience - Daniel Libeskind 2011.

In her photographs, Timpau plays with the materiality as natural light bleeds down the cast concrete interior from small slits in the building's face and studies

© Alexandra Timpau
© Alexandra Timpau
© Alexandra Timpau
© Alexandra Timpau
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Minnesota’s Experimental City of the Future that Never Got Built

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Conceptual drawing of MXC’s primary domed enclosure, proposed to be a mile wide in early discussions, but eventually scaled back. Image Courtesy of The Experimental City Documentary Conceptual drawing of MXC’s primary domed enclosure, proposed to be a mile wide in early discussions, but eventually scaled back. Image Courtesy of The Experimental City Documentary The Minnesota Experimental City (MXC)—a utopian plan for the city of the future that was decades ahead of its time, and yet is surprisingly little-known—was the brainchild of the urban planner and technocrat Athelstan Spilhaus. Spilhaus was a man who saw science as the solution to the problems of the world, and became a public figure presenting his ideas of utopia in everyday life through his comic strip "Our New Age." During the mid-1960s, he conceived an ambitious plan to condense his ideas into a prototype for future cities that would be both noiseless and fumeless, accommodating America's growing population and their by-products. A new documentary, The Experimental City, explores the development, and ultimately, failure of the MXC's vision for future settlements. Using retro
Athelstan Spilhaus’ first "Our New Age" comic, from 1958, shows an incredibly prescient understanding of the coming challenges of climate change. Image Courtesy of The Experimental City Documentary
Spilhaus’ "Our New Age" comic from 1966 about his recently-proposed Experimental City project. Image Courtesy of The Experimental City Documentary
Illustration of dual-mode transportation options for the Experimental City.  "Mechanical Guidance" was ultimately selected for MXC’s transportation system. Image Courtesy of The Experimental City Documentary
Illustration of the Experimental City’s proposed underground infrastructure, based on original conceptual drawings. Image Courtesy of The Experimental City Documentary
Experimental City conceptual drawing by MXC urban designer N.J. Pinney. Image Courtesy of N.J. Pinney
Conceptual drawing of a possible air zoning scheme for the Experimental City, by MXC urban designer N.J. Pinney. Image Courtesy of N.J. Pinney
Protestors from rural Swatara, Minnesota march 200 miles to the Capitol in St. Paul; 1973. Image Courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society
Conceptual Model of MXC’s megastructure. Image Courtesy of N.J. Pinney
Conceptual drawing of MXC megastructure’s interior, by MXC urban designer N.J. Pinney. Image Courtesy of N.J. Pinney
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Lightweight and Compact Shelter Is The Last Base Before the Climb to the Highest Point in Europe

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© Artem Oganov © Artem Oganov At an altitude of 3,800 meters, Ice-Age architects have designed and produced a compact and lightweight shelter as the last base before climbers venture up Mount Elbrus, the highest point in Europe. Inspired by Buckminster Fuller's 2V geodesic dome, it can sleep up to 16 people as they acclimatize to the altitude and wait for the appropriate weather for the climb. 
© Artem Oganov © Artem Oganov
© Artem Oganov © Artem Oganov

The geodesic dome, defined by the shortest paths between two points on a sphere, was originally popularised by the American architect, inventor, and engineer Buckminster Fuller. His revolutionary work in the 1940s for solving the housing problem led him to develop the infamous dome structure by replicating "nature's own coordinate system" found in spheres such as molecules and planets. By breaking the linearity of traditional housing, Fuller discovered the efficiency of the sphere from a minimum

© Artem Oganov
© Artem Oganov
Model / Inside
Model
Model / Inside
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