What is Deconstructivism?

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Tschumi's Parc de la Villette . Image Courtesy of The Architectural Review Tschumi's Parc de la Villette . Image Courtesy of The Architectural Review If we define “deconstructivism” (although it is not a verified word in the dictionary), it literally translates to the breaking down, or demolishing of a constructed structure, whether it being for structural reasons or just an act of rebellion. It is perhaps for this  this reason that many misunderstand the Deconstructivist movement. Deconstructivism is, in fact, not a new architecture style, nor is it an avant-garde movement against architecture or society. It does not follow “rules” or acquire specific aesthetics, nor is it a rebellion against a social dilemma. It is the unleashing of infinite possibilities of playing around with forms and volumes.  During the First World War, Russian avant-gardists, known as Russian Constructivists, broke the rules of classical architecture and composition and presented a series of drawings that defied the “geometric norms” at the time. Their
Tatlin Tower. Image Courtesy of Flickr User Andy Roberts under CC by 2.0
Courtesy of Elizabeth W Garber
Villa Savoye Le Corbusier
Peter Eisenman. Image © Chris Wiley
Tschumi's Parc de la Villette . Image Courtesy of The Architectural Review
1988 Deconstructivism Exhibition. Image via MoMA
Frank Gehry House. Image © Liao Yusheng
Louis Vuitton Foundation, Frank Gehry Architects. Image © Todd Eberle
Port offices of Antwerp, Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Helene Binet
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ETH Zurich Fabricated the World’s First Full-Scale Architectural Project Using 3-D Sand Printing

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Complex designs often require bulky structural systems to support imaginative forms. But 3D printing technology has begun to provide unlimited architectural potential without compromising design or structural durability. Researchers at ETH Zurich, under the leadership of Benjamin Dillenburger, have now developed an innovative 3D sand printing technique that allows for quick molding and material reuse.

They have used this technique to create a formwork to fabricate an 80 square meter lightweight concrete slab at the DFAB House, the first and largest construction of its kind. The “Smart Slab,” which carries a two-story timber unit above it, merges the structural durability and strength of concrete with the design liberation of 3D printing.

© ETH Zurich / Mike Lyrenmann © ETH Zurich / Mike Lyrenmann

Step by Step Process

The design team refrained from 3D printing all building components, but rather, created a mold that would produce an intricately-designed ceiling able to maintain its load-bearing characteristics. This

Courtesy of ETH Zurich / Andrei Jipa
Courtesy of ETH Zurich / Tom Mundy
Courtesy of ETH Zurich / Andrei Jipa
Courtesy of ETH Zurich / Andrei Jipa
Courtesy of ETH Zurich / Demetris Shammas
Courtesy of ETH Zurich / Andrei Jipa
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UM Architect’s New Zhangjiang City Gate Reconnects Occupants with Nature

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Courtesy of UM Architects Courtesy of UM Architects Chinese cities have been on a stride for decades, and are expected to become the world’s leading economy within the next few years. With all the ongoing architectural developments, nature remained key in most architects’ design developments, honoring the Chinese landscape and integrating it within their projects. The Zhangjiang New District is one of China’s new ongoing developments, housing numerous structures and architectural installations. Architecture firm UM has been selected to design the “City Gate,” a new iconic landmark in the New District, which will act as a transition between the extensive urbanism of Gan Zhou and its surrounding nature. One of the main purposes of the project was to create an environment that caters to both the residential and commercial needs of the region, making the best of the project’s prominent location.  The project, which was inspired by Ximeng Wang’s “Thousand Miles of
Courtesy of UM Architects
Courtesy of UM Architects
Site Plan
Courtesy of UM Architects
Full Scheme
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Iotti + Pavarani Architetti Design ‘New Pisa Stadium’ Just Meters Away from the Leaning Tower

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Courtesy of IOTTI + PAVARANI ARCHITETTI Courtesy of IOTTI + PAVARANI ARCHITETTI Iotti + Pavarani Architetti have designed a 'New Pisa Stadium' for A.C. Pisa on an existing stadium just 200 meters away from Piazza dei Miracoli (home to the Leaning Tower of Pisa). After winning the first prize in a restricted competition in 2017, the project is currently under feasibility study, awaiting construction development.  
Courtesy of IOTTI + PAVARANI ARCHITETTI Courtesy of IOTTI + PAVARANI ARCHITETTI

The architects insisted on maintaining the site’s historic significance, and chose to design a harmonious structure, “establishing a dialogue with the past while also looking towards the future.” In addition to its main function, the stadium will house several multi-functional public spaces, creating a new engaging square for the city of Pisa.

Courtesy of IOTTI + PAVARANI ARCHITETTI Courtesy of IOTTI + PAVARANI ARCHITETTI
Courtesy of IOTTI + PAVARANI ARCHITETTI Courtesy of IOTTI + PAVARANI ARCHITETTI

A large ring-like green space will circulate around the stadium creating a free-flow for visiting pedestrians. This space will

Courtesy of IOTTI + PAVARANI ARCHITETTI
Courtesy of IOTTI + PAVARANI ARCHITETTI
Continue reading "Iotti + Pavarani Architetti Design ‘New Pisa Stadium’ Just Meters Away from the Leaning Tower"

Brutalism & Skateboarding: J. Byron-H’s Unique Furniture Inspired by An Odd Pairing

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© Samuel McGuire © Samuel McGuire Architects and designers are turning into their very own version of Midas, everything they touch turns into concrete. With products like concrete coffee machines, concrete garden gnomes, and even concrete jewelry, designers are finding remarkable ways of experimenting with the material, proving that concrete is a lot more than just a bulky, building component. Los Angeles based architect-designer J.Byron-H, known for his playfulness with material and unexpected forms, have experimented with concrete and glass-fiber and created contemporary, light-weight pieces of furniture, inspired by skateboards and architectural brutalism.
© Samuel McGuire © Samuel McGuire
© Samuel McGuire © Samuel McGuire
© Samuel McGuire © Samuel McGuire

The Concrete Stools series are available in three different dimensions: the low stool, the high stool, and the bench. The stools are made of cast and warped glass-fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC), and are available in a range of colorful pastel shades (grape, tangerine, lemon,

© Samuel McGuire
© Samuel McGuire
© Samuel McGuire
Continue reading "Brutalism & Skateboarding: J. Byron-H’s Unique Furniture Inspired by An Odd Pairing"

AMKNA’s Ode to Africa Shortlisted for the 2018 World Architecture Festival Award

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Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio AMKNA, the Dubai-based studio, has been shortlisted for the 2018 World Architecture Festival, in recognition of their design proposal of a cultural center in Sedhiou, Senegal. The proposed “Sedhiou Cultural Center” will provide citizens with a rich cultural, social, and educational experience, all while sustaining the surrounding environment and keeping African heritage alive.
Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio

The power of a cultural building lies in its ability to morph history, music, food, dance, color, and material into a well-designed, functional space. Senegal’s Sedhiou is one of Africa’s underdeveloped towns but is rich in cultural vibrancy. Regardless of its lively heritage, the town lacks a place of artistic expression and is constantly affected by the economy’s globalization. The proposal’s design seeks to become an icon for the entire country, ensuring sustainability and the use of local materials. The structure will include areas

Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio
Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio
Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio
Continue reading "AMKNA’s Ode to Africa Shortlisted for the 2018 World Architecture Festival Award"

AMKNA’s Ode to Africa Shortlisted for the 2018 World Architecture Festival Award

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Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio AMKNA, the Dubai-based studio, has been shortlisted for the 2018 World Architecture Festival, in recognition of their design proposal of a cultural center in Sedhiou, Senegal. The proposed “Sedhiou Cultural Center” will provide citizens with a rich cultural, social, and educational experience, all while sustaining the surrounding environment and keeping African heritage alive.
Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio

The power of a cultural building lies in its ability to morph history, music, food, dance, color, and material into a well-designed, functional space. Senegal’s Sedhiou is one of Africa’s underdeveloped towns but is rich in cultural vibrancy. Regardless of its lively heritage, the town lacks a place of artistic expression and is constantly affected by the economy’s globalization. The proposal’s design seeks to become an icon for the entire country, ensuring sustainability and the use of local materials. The structure will include areas

Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio
Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio
Courtesy of AMKNA Design Studio
Continue reading "AMKNA’s Ode to Africa Shortlisted for the 2018 World Architecture Festival Award"

How Long Does it Take to Become an Architect?

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Courtesy of Andrea Vasquez Courtesy of Andrea Vasquez

Before deciding on a career in architecture, plenty of questions can cross one’s mind: Which school should I choose? Should I study abroad or choose a local school? Would enrolling in top international universities cost me a fortune? How long will it take for me to finally be able to build my own structure? At the end of the day, the making of an architect is pretty simple: half a decade of architecture studies, and then some.

Whether you are considering studying abroad or staying home, you'll need to know how long it takes to become an architect in your country of choice. Take a look at how long it usually takes to earn that degree in different countries from all over the world, and what you'll need to do (aside from attending school) before becoming a certified architect.

The journey of earning an architectural license

via Tableau / Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture
Courtesy of Andrea Vasquez
Courtesy of Andrea Vasquez
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Award-Winning Sketching App ‘Concepts’ Releases New Update Including Customized Brushes

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Courtesy of David Clynk Courtesy of David Clynk Being a 21st-century designer is not always a walk in the park, but it certainly has its perks. Fortunately, innovative product and software designers have created numerous programs that transform our ideas and visions into visual and tangible reality. Concepts, the “next-generation design platform” is an iOS application, suitable for all design and engineering fields. Accommodating almost 80% of all design tasks, product designers, fashion designers, game designers, and industrial engineers can benefit from what the application has to offer. The TopHatch creation - which is trusted by leading designers at Disney, Apple, Nike, PlayStation, Unity, and several other leading corporations - was initiated as a simple prototype, and gradually built on feedback and innovative updates. Following our Top Apps for Architects article, the award-winning vector-based app, is launching a brand new update, with exclusive features that enable a limitless, customized, and more
Courtesy of Concepts
Courtesy of Concepts
Courtesy of Concepts
Courtesy of Osama Elfar
Courtesy of Concepts
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51N4E wins 2018 European Prize for Urban Public Space

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Courtesy of 51N4E Courtesy of 51N4E Brussels-based architecture firm 51N4E have won first prize for their Skanderbeg Square project in Tirana, Albania. The European Prize for Urban Public Space is a biennale competition that promotes creating, restoring, and improving public spaces within European cities, and have chosen this year’s winners for their impressive transformation of the city’s central square. 51N4E’s restructuring and renovation of the Skanderbeg Square is a result of winning an international architecture competition back in 2008. After the project was paused in 2010 for administrative changes, and resumed in 2015, the end result is a series of urban interventions, “inviting public and semi-public neighboring functions to spread into the exterior space”.
Courtesy of 51N4E Courtesy of 51N4E

The project is a large, 170 x 170 meter “traffic-free zone” pedestrian area, built in a flat pyramid-shape. For the structure’s material, the architects used various stones obtained from different parts of Albania, keeping the

Courtesy of 51N4E
Courtesy of 51N4E
Courtesy of 51N4E
Cuypers Passage, Amsterdam / Benthem Crouwel Architects. Image Courtesy of 611
Cuypers Passage, Amsterdam / Benthem Crouwel Architects. Image Courtesy of 611
Poblenou Superblock, Barcelona / Ecology, Urbanism, and Mobility Department, Barcelona City Council. Image Courtesy of Ajuntament de Barcelona
Poblenou Superblock, Barcelona / Ecology, Urbanism, and Mobility Department, Barcelona City Council. Image Courtesy of Ajuntament de Barcelona
Stage Dnipro, Ukraine / STAGE CLIEHA community. Image Courtesy of Katerina Kovacheva
Stage Dnipro, Ukraine / STAGE CLIEHA community. Image Courtesy of Alexander Burlaka
Zollverein Park, Essen, Germany / Planergruppe GmbH Oberhausen. Image Courtesy of Claudia Drey
Zollverein Park, Essen, Germany / Planergruppe GmbH Oberhausen. Image Courtesy of Claudia Drey
PC Caritas, Melle, Belgium / architecten de vylder vinck taillieu and BAVO. Image Courtesy of Filip Dujardin
PC Caritas, Melle, Belgium / architecten de vylder vinck taillieu and BAVO. Image Courtesy of Filip Dujardin
Continue reading "51N4E wins 2018 European Prize for Urban Public Space"

IMPLMNT Highlights “Connection and Transformation” in Award-Winning Proposal for New Lithuanian Cultural Center

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Courtesy of IMPLMNT Courtesy of IMPLMNT Lithuanian city Panevezys will have a new cultural hub thanks to the winning design of architecture firm, IMPLMNT. The proposed design of the Stasys Eidrigevicius Arts Centre, which will be built in the northern part of the city center, won the competition due to its function, location, architecture, and the social/economic value it will be adding to the city. The center will take the place of an existing movie theater, a historic landmark in the Lithuanian city. After performing structural analysis on the existing theater, a study of the conditions indicated that it can no longer be preserved or saved. Keeping in mind the importance of the movie theater to the city, the architects at IMPLMNT decided to draw inspiration from the existing building, as well as use its proportions to create the newly-designed structure.
Courtesy of IMPLMNT Courtesy of IMPLMNT

The location and plot of the newly designed cultural

Courtesy of IMPLMNT
Elevation / Section
Plan
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Vega Archipelago to be Home to Norway’s First UNESCO World Heritage Visitor Center

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Courtesy of Ekberg Lous Architects / Visualizations by AZR Studio Courtesy of Ekberg Lous Architects / Visualizations by AZR Studio Oslo-based architecture firm Ekberg Lous Arkitekter have begun constructing Norway’s first World Heritage Visitor Center, after having won the open international architectural competition in 2008. Following the competition, the project was halted for seven years due to a lack of funding, but has been given the green light in 2015 with revised plans and a new site. The center, which will be built on the tip of the northern shore of Vega Island, is expected to be a gathering point for both locals and foreigners. It will provide visitors with knowledge about the natural and cultural values of the Vega Archipelago and world heritage sites in general. The center is set to be open in spring 2019.
Courtesy of Ekberg Lous Architects / Visualizations by AZR Studio Courtesy of Ekberg Lous Architects / Visualizations by AZR Studio

The architecture is specifically designed to enhance one’s relationship with nature.

Courtesy of Ekberg Lous Architects / Visualizations by AZR Studio
Site Plan
Courtesy of Ekberg Lous Architects / Visualizations by AZR Studio
Facade Elevation
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‘The Hyperloop Suburb’: Louise Braverman on the Future of Suburban Living

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How do we want to live? Should we lean towards a turbulent metropolitan life with an all-inclusive advantage, or should we favor the composed suburban life with sufficient services? What if architects and urbanists were able to implement some of these all-inclusive services into disregarded areas of the suburbs? In the latest installment of PLANE—SITE’s short video series of the Time-Space-Existence exhibition, Louise Braverman Architect, a New York-based firm, explores the utopic and dynamic vision of the future of suburbs, and how Hyperloop technology could breathe a new life into these often overlooked places.
© Doc Searls © Doc Searls

Suburbs are often thought of as family-oriented, characterless places. Ironically, the majority of citizens choose to live and raise families in the suburbs instead of the city, regardless of how advanced urban areas are. Architect Louise Braverman believes that implementing the Hyperloop technology into suburbs will develop “aesthetically delightful, digitally driven,

Louise Braverman. Image Courtesy of PLANE—SITE
The Hyperloop Suburb Exhibition. Image Courtesy of PLANE—SITE
Virgin Hyperloop One. Image Courtesy of Virgin Hyperloop One
Virgin Hyperloop One. Image Courtesy of Virgin Hyperloop One
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Contemporary Religious Architecture That Rethinks Traditional Spaces for Worship

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© Fabrice Fouillet © Fabrice Fouillet

Constructing places of worship has always been an intricate practice, managing to detach the human, and release the boundary between body, mind, and spirit. Holy presence has been crucial in designing and constructing sacred places, which is why almost all religious building possessed similar characteristics: grandiosity, monolithic material, natural elements, and a plan that compliments an individual’s circulation through the space. Contemporary religious structures, however, found a way to adapt to the evolution of architecture. Unlike the Gothic or Baroque periods, modern-day architecture does not have a dominant identity. It is, in fact, a combination of postmodernism, futurism, minimalism, and everything in between. Architects have found a way to transform these exclusive, religion-devoted places into structures of spirituality, manifestation, and fascination.

Here is a selection of contemporary religious buildings that prove once again that architects are breaking all boundaries of creativity.

The San Josemaría
© Fran Parente
© Adam Letch
Courtesy of Kojii Fuji / Nacasa & Partners Inc.
© Abdulrahman Alolyan
© Ahmad Mirzaee
Courtesy of S.M.A.O
© Esteban Suarez
© Filip Dujardin
Courtesy of EAA Emre Arolat Architects
© Denis Esacov
© Vicens & Ramos
© Akash Kumar Das
© David Schreyer
Courtesy of Asamblea Espiritual Nacional de los Bah'Ìs de Chile + Hariri Pontarini Architects
Courtesy of Futo Tussauds
© Yousuke Harigane
© Pedro Pegenaute
© Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Adam Mork
© Randall Connaughton
© Milo Keller
Courtesy of Wikimedia User Ansgar Koreng / CC BY 3.0 (DE)
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Hidden Architectural Gems to Visit this Summer

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Rachid Karameh Exhibition. Image © Anthony Saroufim Rachid Karameh Exhibition. Image © Anthony Saroufim

Summer. Vacation. Two magic words that will certainly ease all the pain and exhaustion of working/studying full-time. Now that it is that time of year, most people are busy planning their travel itineraries. Whether it’s a city trip to Paris to see the Eiffel Tower and the Louvre, or a journey to walk on China’s Great Wall, the majority of travelers will choose to cross iconic landmarks off their bucket lists. However, there is a lot more to London than the London Bridge and Buckingham Palace, and there is a lot more to Barcelona than Gaudí. There are, in fact, hundreds of underrated, exquisite structures that go unnoticed.

If you are planning a getaway soon, here is a list of hidden architectural gems that are worth the visit.

The Abbey of San Galgano, Florence, Italy

Abbey of San Galgano. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user MAX PIXEK  licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Abbey of San Galgano. Image Courtesy
The Church of the Holy Redeemer. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia User Ggia  licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
The Model Prison. Image © Tod Seelie
The Traboules of Lyon. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia User Phinou  licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
The Spanish Monastery. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia User Daderot  licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
Woolwich Town Hall. Image © Marathon
Sketch London. Image Courtesy of Sketch London
La Fabrica. Image Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill
Walden 7. Image Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill
Royal Mansour Spa. Image Courtesy of Royal Mansour Hotel Management
Kelburn Castle. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia User CoburnProjects  licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
Liquidrom. Image Courtesy of Liquidrom
Schwerbelastungskörper. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user Sekamor  licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
Iglesia El Rosario. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user Jose Quintanilla licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
Rachid Karameh Exhibition. Image © Anthony Saroufim
Continue reading "Hidden Architectural Gems to Visit this Summer"

WXCA Architects’ Polish Museum Proposal Wins First Prize in Open Architecture Competition

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Courtesy of WXCA Architects Courtesy of WXCA Architects WXCA Architects’ proposed building has been chosen as the winning design of the Muzeum Książąt Lubomirskich in Wroclaw, Poland. Over 100 designs from all over the world were submitted for the project. However, the winning firm’s proposal provided a homogeneous balance of contemporary design with classical elements, a concept that led to their first-place prize.
Courtesy of WXCA Architects Courtesy of WXCA Architects

The building’s massive walls were formed by intricately aligned stone blocks, piled in a classical composition. The windows produce a rhythmic composition on the façade, creating an irregular yet harmonious drawing. The contemporary feel to the building is the result of the complex details found within the structure. This blend of traditional with contemporary is a clear reflection of the culture’s identity: continuity and permanence in art and architecture.

Courtesy of WXCA Architects Courtesy of WXCA Architects
Courtesy of WXCA Architects Courtesy of WXCA Architects
The design team consists of: WXCA Architects, Szczepan
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Alec Tzannes Awarded the Gold Medal, Australian Institute of Architects’ Highest Honor

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© Ben Guthrie © Ben Guthrie The Australian Institute of ArchitectsGold Medal recognizes exemplary work by architects who have designed buildings of high value and great distinction, resulting in the advancement of the architecture profession.   This year, Jury Chair Richard Kirk presented Australian practitioner and Emeritus professor Alec Tzannes with the ceremony’s highest honor.
Alec Tzannes. Image © Toby Burrows Alec Tzannes. Image © Toby Burrows

Tzannes has executed an exceptional body of work across a broad spectrum of architectural practice. The outstanding contribution Alec Tzannes has made to the architectural profession exemplifies the highest level of achievement within each of the criteria.
-The Jury

Cranbrook Junior School. Image © Simon Wood Cranbrook Junior School. Image © Simon Wood

Tzannes’ attention to detail and refined work earned him his reputation. Not only were his earlier projects carefully studied and executed, but they respected the context and environment that they are built in. His method continued throughout his career, integrating architecture, urban design, landscape, and art. Some

Dangrove. Image © Ben Guthrie
Cranbrook Junior School. Image © John Gollings
Cranbrook Junior School. Image © Richard Glover
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