‘220 Mini Metros’ Illustrates Metro and Train Networks from Around the World

    <img src="https://images.adsttc.com/media/images/5907/54f8/e58e/ce23/d200/028e/original/ezgif.com-gif-maker.gif?1493652725" />

American graphic designer Peter Dovak is passionate about urban transportation. He has creates colorful designs that represent transit systems in a much more instructive way so that people can interpret them more easily. 

One of his last projects, called 220 Mini Metros, was based on metro and light rail networks from 220 cities of the world. 

Click to enlarge. “220 Mini Metros”. Image © Peter Dovak Click to enlarge. “220 Mini Metros”. Image © Peter Dovak
The selections were made using visual characteristic criteria that made it possible to represent each of the networks with a visual identity that allowed them to be compared to one another, for example, the number of lines and the coverage between the systems. Among the 220 chosen systems there are cities that stand out for the sheer size of their metro networks such as Beijing, New York, Paris, and Seoul. Check out the 220 designs in more detail the project’s official site.   
  <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/ArchDaily/~4/ECh63PD7nOc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

‘220 Mini Meters’ Illustrates Metro and Train Networks from Around the World

    <img src="http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/5907/54f8/e58e/ce23/d200/028e/original/ezgif.com-gif-maker.gif?1493652725" />

American graphic designer Peter Dovak is passionate about urban transportation. He has creates colorful designs that represent transit systems in a much more instructive way so that people can interpret them more easily. 

One of his last projects, called 220 Mini Metros, was based on metro and light rail networks from 220 cities of the world. 

Haz click para agrandar. “220 Mini Metro”. Image © Peter Dovak Haz click para agrandar. “220 Mini Metro”. Image © Peter Dovak
The selections were made using visual characteristic criteria that made it possible to represent each of the networks with a visual identity that allowed them to be compared to one another, for example, the number of lines and the coverage between the systems. Among the 220 chosen systems there are cities that stand out for the sheer size of their metro networks such as Beijing, New York, Paris, and Seoul. Check out the 220 designs in more detail the project’s official site.   
  <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/ArchDaily/~4/5paL4A2SlD4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

6 Tips for Designing Accessible and Safe Bus Stops

    <figure>
© NACTO © NACTO

Designing urban spaces to improve mobility for all inhabitants is one of the main objectives of NACTO, the National Association of City Transportation Officials. Founded in 1996, this non-profit organization brings together more than 40 US and Canadian cities to share their advice and design practices seeking to raise the design standards in public policies for public spaces, mobility, and transportation.

They’ve developed a series of guides in which they propose design guidelines to make streets, cycle paths, intersections and other urban spaces more accessible and safe for all road users. One of the most recent is the "Transit Street Design Guide" in which they offer, among other things, 6 recommendations to take into account when designing bus stops. Find out what these recommendations are below.

1. "Stations are Gateways."

© NACTO © NACTO

The relationship vehicular traffic has with sidewalks and buildings is one point

© NACTO
© NACTO
© NACTO
© NACTO
© NACTO
Continue reading "6 Tips for Designing Accessible and Safe Bus Stops"

Three Key Elements Needed to Revitalize Public Spaces and Promote Urban Life

    <figure>
Parque Cheonggyecheon en Seúl, Corea del Sur. © longzijun, vía Flickr Parque Cheonggyecheon en Seúl, Corea del Sur. © longzijun, vía Flickr The importance of public spaces in urban life is an issue that has been apparent since ancient Greece and is still with us today. Opportunities to meet and exchange ideas in these spaces are able to influence how the inhabitants participate in the development of their city, and occur in greater instances when public spaces are accessible to everyone. However, in modern societies, the strategic role of these spaces has been limited. According to The City Fix, a blog on sustainable urban planning, one of the main reasons for this is the overabundance of automobiles. In fact, according to one study by the Brazilian Institute for Energy and the Environment, 70% of public spaces in urban centers are taken up by roadways and other spaces for cars, while car owners make up only around 20 to 40 percent
“21 Columpios” en Montreal, Canadá
Usuario Flickr: wwian
Parque Cantinho do Céu no bairro do Grajaú em São Paulo. Fuente: Soluções para as cidades
Continue reading "Three Key Elements Needed to Revitalize Public Spaces and Promote Urban Life"

The Worlds Longest Elevated Cycling Path Opens in China

This month, in the city of Xiamen, China's first elevated cycling path was inaugurated. At nearly 8 kilometers long, the structure is now the world's longest elevated cycling path.

The construction of this exclusive cycling path was promoted by the Xiamen City Government to provide inhabitants with a new sustainable transportation alternative that could significantly reduce vehicular traffic on the city's already congested highways. 

The project was designed by the Danish firm Dissing + Weitling, the team behind 2014's "Bicycle Snake" in Copenhagen. Talking about their latest projects, the architects explain that it was developed "with a vision to inspire people to prioritize green alternatives, such as the bicycle, instead of the automobile."

As a result, connections to other public transport systems can be made at 13 points along the cycling path, helping to facilitate intermodality in the daily commute of inhabitants across three financial centers and five residential neighborhoods of the

Continue reading "The Worlds Longest Elevated Cycling Path Opens in China"

“MethodKit for Cities” 105 Cards to Discuss and Plan the Future of our Cities

    <figure>
Courtesy of MethodKit Courtesy of MethodKit

Planning can be a complex task depending on the factors at play such as time, participants, and topics.

Since 2012 a Swedish firm called MethodKit has dedicated itself to designing kits to simplify task in many professional disciplines using cards that raise an issue and guide the discussion.

Initially, these kits were oriented towards design and digital technology, however, with such a collaborative and easy to use tool they were expanded to architecture and urban planning.

Courtesy of MethodKit Courtesy of MethodKit

One of the firm’s most recent releases involves the latter discipline. "MethodKit for Cities," is a kit aimed at architects, citizens, students, social organizations, planners, etc. to participate in constructing their environments.

To find out more about this kit Plataforma Urbana talked with the founder of the firm, Ola Möller, who is also the co-author of this kit along with architect Jordan Lane.

According to them,

Courtesy of MethodKit
Courtesy of MethodKit
Continue reading "“MethodKit for Cities” 105 Cards to Discuss and Plan the Future of our Cities"

Free Online Course on Urban Challenges in Emerging Countries is Open for Enrollment

    <figure>
"Rethink the City; New Approaches to Global and Local Urban Challenges" is a free online course given by Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, starting on March 28, 2017. The course aims to address urban challenges in emerging countries to provide a new perspective in understanding and analyzing the southern hemisphere. For this reason, the content is structured in the following three thematic axes: "Spatial Justice," "Housing Provision and Management," and "Urban Resilience". Enrollment is now open through the Edx.org online education platform. The course has a duration of six weeks between 3 to 4 hours per week and is aimed especially at undergraduate students, especially those in Latin America, Asia, and Africa, according to the course content. Rethink the City is a completely free... - Rethink the City | Facebook The coordinating team is composed of Luz Maria Vergara d'Alençon, architect of the Catholic
Continue reading "Free Online Course on Urban Challenges in Emerging Countries is Open for Enrollment"

Lighted Zebra Crossing is Lighting the Way to Safer Streets

          <div class="container-video">
    <iframe
      class="container-video__aspect-ratio"
      src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JlU-ZKEqVmo?theme=light&showinfo=0&color=white"
      frameborder="0"
      allowfullscreen>
    </iframe>
  </div>
Pedestrians, the most vulnerable users of road space, will now be more visible to drivers in the Netherlands with the inauguration of a new luminous pedestrian crossing this past November in Brummen, west of Amsterdam. Designed by the Dutch firm Lighted Zebra Crossing, and installed free of charge for the municipality, this crossing makes pedestrians more visible at night or during bad weather. Each of the lines has two plates of lights that at night remain illuminated at all times and not only when there are people on them.

#lightedzebracrossing #pedestriansafety #innovation #roadsafety #pedestrian #visionzero #crosswalk #dutch?? #worldwide #contactusnow

A photo posted by Lighted Zebra Crossing B.V. (@lightedzebracrossing) on

The placement of the lights assures less distraction to the motorist than light pillars as it helps drivers keep their visual attention on the road.  Trial tests were performed for 12 months, however the idea
Continue reading "Lighted Zebra Crossing is Lighting the Way to Safer Streets"

Jan Gehl 5 Rules for Designing Great Cities

    <figure>
Copenhagen, Denmark. Image © Flickr User: Forgemind ArchiMedia. License CC BY 2.0 Copenhagen, Denmark. Image © Flickr User: Forgemind ArchiMedia. License CC BY 2.0 Danish architect Jan Gehl is a world renowned expert in all things related to urban design and public spaces. He obtained this expertise by publishing numerous books, and later, from his consulting firm Gehl Architects that he founded in Copenhagen, his hometown, to make cities for people. The firm celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2016. During a recent visit to New York, Gehl gave a lecture at the Van Alen Institute, which takes a very similar approach to the importance of design in the quality of life of people. The architect discussed five tips that were published by Fast Co.Design and explained what he believes is the way to go about having livable, healthy, safe and sustainable cities. The 5 points he mentioned are: 1. Stop Building 'Architecture for Cheap Gasoline' 
Las Vegas, United States. Image © Flickr User: Jan Buchholtz. License CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 Las Vegas, United States.
Superkilen Park, Copenhagen. Image © Flickr User: Forgemind ArchiMedia. Licencia CC BY 2.0
Venicde, Italy. Image © Flickr User Ștefan Jurcă. License CC BY 2.0
Traffic in Singapore. Image © Flickr User Lynac. License CC BY-NC 2.0
Continue reading "Jan Gehl 5 Rules for Designing Great Cities"

“The Arrogance of Space”: Mapping The Unfair Distribution of Public Space at Urban Intersections

    <figure>
© Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr © Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr Unequal distribution of public space when it comes to pedestrians, cyclists and people driving cars is an issue that urban mobility specialist Mikael Colville-Andersen calls "The Arrogance of Space."  The urban planner and founder of Copenhagenize believe that this term can be applied to streets that are dominated by traffic engineers from last century where streets were made primarily for cars.  To illustrate his position, Mikael analyzed the amount of space allocated to each of these groups, in addition to "dead space” and space for buildings, in the streets of Calgary, Paris, and Tokyo by comparing each sector using different colors.  Take a look at the findings below.  Paris
© Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr © Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr

Looking down at the intersection of Quai Branly and Pont d'Iéna in Paris from above, we see the spaces for pedestrians, cyclists, and cars. It is color-coded, using

© Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr
© Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr
© Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr
© Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr
© Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr
© Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr
© Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr
© Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr
© Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr
© Mikael Colville-Andersen, via Flickr
Continue reading "“The Arrogance of Space”: Mapping The Unfair Distribution of Public Space at Urban Intersections"

These Are the 3 Bus Stop Types Needed For Sustainable Transit Solutions

    <figure>
© NACTO © NACTO The latest publication of the National Association of City Transportation Officials, NACTO, is the "Transit Street Design Guide" in which tips and proposals are presented on how to improve streets through urban design. The ideas are centered on prioritizing sustainable mobility so that both the member cities of the organization and those that have access to this document can improve their practices in relation to public spaces, mobility, and transportation.  From these recommendations, the organization made a series of designs classified according to the style of stops that are defined as somewhere "to do more than just wait."

We talk about three such designs for bus stops below. 

1. In-lane Sidewalk Stop
© NACTO © NACTO

Bus stops on sidewalks are probably the most common due to their low economic cost and how quickly they can be made.  In addition, the design is easy to replicate

© NACTO
© NACTO
Continue reading "These Are the 3 Bus Stop Types Needed For Sustainable Transit Solutions"

The Economic and Social Power of Walkable Cities

    <figure>
New York, USA. Image © Flickr User: Jeffrey Zeldman. Licence CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 New York, USA. Image © Flickr User: Jeffrey Zeldman. Licence CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 Over the last few years, the way Americans move around has changed remarkably, especially among young people. Previously the automobile was people’s preferred, if not the only, option. Now they are choosing to walk, bike, or use public transport according to recent studies. This difference in preferred transportation methods has generated many benefits not only for residents but also for cities, in both economic and social terms.  A study conducted in 2014 by Smart Growth America, dedicated to improving communities, in conjunction with the George Washington University School of Business and the Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis, of 30 metropolitan areas were classified according to how walkable they are and how this influences their commercial development, talent attraction, or the educational level of people who are in those places and the economic performance of
Click on the image to enlarge. Image © Source: Study “Foot Traffic Ahead 2016”.
Click on the image to enlarge. Image © Source: Study “Foot Traffic Ahead 2016”.
Click on the image to enlarge. Image © Source: Study “Foot Traffic Ahead 2016”.
Continue reading "The Economic and Social Power of Walkable Cities"

6 Cities That Have Transformed Their Highways Into Urban Parks

    <figure>
Courtesy of Unknown Courtesy of Unknown

Building a highway in a city is often thought of as a solution to traffic congestion. However, the induced demand theory has shown that when drivers have more routes, they choose to continue using this medium instead of using public transport or a bicycle, and as a result, congestion doesn’t decrease.

As a result, some cities have chosen to remove spaces designated for cars and turn what was once a highway into urban parks and less congested streets.  Here we have six examples, some have already been completed, while a few are still under construction. To the surprise of some, most of the projects are in the US, which reflects that American designers are looking into further studying European transport policies.  Harbor Drive, Portland – USA
Courtesy of Unknown Courtesy of Unknown

One of the first highways in the US to be eliminated to make way for a park was Portland,

Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown
© trevor.patt, via Flickr
Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown
Continue reading "6 Cities That Have Transformed Their Highways Into Urban Parks"

New York City Mapped All of its Trees and Calculated the Economic Benefits of Every Single One

    <figure>
via  NYC Parks via NYC Parks Public spaces, squares, and parks in New York City are administered by the city’s Department of Parks & Recreation (NYC Parks). In recent years, the agency has been responsible for creating new programs to help children, youth and adults be aware of the importance of caring for their urban landscape. One of these programs is a TreesCount! which in 2015 gathered 2,300 volunteers to learn about the trees in their environment, what state they are in, what care they need, what their measurements are, and how they benefit the surrounding community, etc. For months, they walked the streets of the five boroughs together with a group of monitors who previously trained them to recognize what trees they were studying and their characteristics.  Now the information gathered on these walks, which gave rise to an urban forest registry, is available on the New York City Tree Map. With it, you can view
via  NYC Parks
via  NYC Parks
Continue reading "New York City Mapped All of its Trees and Calculated the Economic Benefits of Every Single One"

Before & After: 30 Photos that Prove the Power of Designing with Pedestrians in Mind

    <figure id="newsroom-picture-att-id-55db8ccfe58ece48a7000005"
    aria-labelledby="figcaption_newsroom-picture-att-id-55db8ccfe58ece48a7000005"
    class="wp-caption aligncenter featured_image">


<a class="nr-image nr-picture" href="http://feedproxy.google.com/773139/before-and-after-30-photos-that-prove-the-power-of-designing-with-pedestrians-in-mind/55db8ccfe58ece48a7000005-before-and-after-30-photos-that-prove-the-power-of-designing-with-pedestrians-in-mind-image" rel="attachment" title="featured_image">
  <img itemprop="image" class="nr-image nr-picture wp-image-55db8ccfe58ece48a7000005"
  title="Padre Alonso de Ovalle, Santiago de Chile. Image Courtesy of Urb-I" src="http://cf.archdaily.com/media/images/55db/8ccf/e58e/ce48/a700/0005/medium_jpg/1.jpg?1440451787"
  alt="Padre Alonso de Ovalle, Santiago de Chile. Image Courtesy of Urb-I"
  data-nr-picture-id="55db8ccfe58ece48a7000005">
</a>
Padre Alonso de Ovalle, Santiago de Chile. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Providing more public space for pedestrians is one of the main goals of urban renewal projects taking place in cities around the world.  By planting more trees, implementing more sidewalks and bike paths and establishing new seating areas, it is possible to design more welcoming places with less traffic congestion and that promote sustainable methods of transportation, such as walking or biking.  With the aim of publicizing urban renewal projects that have made cities more pedestrian friendly, Brazilian group Urb-I launched the “Before/After” project, which compiles before and after photos that show how cities have redistributed their public space.  The project is collaborative so that anyone can use Google Street View, or another similar tool, to raise awareness of the changes taking place in their cities.  Read on to see the transformed spaces. 
Padre Alonso de Ovalle, Santiago de Chile. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Apoquindo, Santiago de Chile. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Bank St., Adelaida, Australia. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Boulevard Ion C., Bucarest, Rumania. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Forth St., Auckland, Nueva Zelanda. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Griffith Park Boulevard, Los Ángeles, Estados Unidos. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Minquen W Rd, Taipei, Taiwán. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Calle Marqués de Leganés, Madrid, España. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Coenties Slip, Nueva York, Estados Unidos. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Regnbuepladsen, Copenhague, Dinamarca. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Rue St. Hubert, Montreal, Canadá. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
R Sacadura Cabral, Río de Janeiro, Brasil. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
R Nova do Carvalho, Lisboa, Portugal. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Plaza Tiradentes, Río de Janeiro, Brasil. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Dutch Kills Green, Queens, Nueva York, Estados Unidos. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Palace St., Dublín, Irlanda. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Avenue General Brosset, Lyon, Francia. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Avenue Shamrock, Montreal, Canadá. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Agias Sofias, Salónica, Grecia. Imagen 2015 por Kosmas Anagnostopoulos. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Av. Duque de Ávila, Lisboa, Portugal. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Avenida Francisco I Madero, Ciudad de México. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Avenida José Larco, Lima, Perú. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Avenue General Brosset, Lyon, Francia. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Stationsstraat, San Nicolás de Flandes, Bélgica. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Strada Halelor, Bucarest, Rumania. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Times Square, Nueva York, Estados Unidos. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Venn St., Londres, Reino Unido. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Young St., Southport, Australia. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Shlomtsiyon HaMalka, Jerusalén, Israel. Image Courtesy of Urb-I
Continue reading "Before & After: 30 Photos that Prove the Power of Designing with Pedestrians in Mind"

A.L. Crego Transforms 20 Murals into Animated GIFS

Spanish designer and photographer A.L. Crego has brought street art to life in his latest project, adding movement to murals from the around the world. In order to maintain the original artwork, Crego first photographed the sites and then digitally intervened to convert them into animations. All the murals selected by the designer convey messages about dependence on technology and its effects on personal interactions. View his urban GIFs after the break. Continue reading "A.L. Crego Transforms 20 Murals into Animated GIFS"

Video: Safer Crossings for Cars, Bicycles and Pedestrians

Click here to view the embedded video. Well-designed, protected bike lanes are not only the desire for riders, but a necessity for cities to offer sustainable transport. Bikes sales are on the rise and it is imperative that cities meet the growing demand. As Portland-based planner Nick Falbo describes: “If your city is designed so that you may bike instead of drive, it would be a happier, healthier place to live.” With that in mind, Falbo has revealed a systematic proposal that can make the intersections safer for bicyclists, cars and pedestrians. Fours steps for safer crossings, after the break…
“Sharing busy traffic lanes with cars is absolutely unacceptable, and separation by a line of paint is often not enough,” explains Falbo. Therefore, he suggests these four solutions:
  1. Install a corner refuge island that increases a safe haven for bicyclist and pedestrians.
  2. Install a forward stop bar that would increase bicyclist visibility, give them a “head start” in front of cars, and shorten the distance of the crossing.
  3. Setback bicycle crossings 6 meters from the intersections to increase reaction times.
  4. Install traffic signals for bicyclists.
Via Plataforma Urbana, PeopleforBikes