Perched Over 2,000-Year-Old Roman Mosaics and Ruins, This Hotel Takes a Bold Approach to Historic Preservation

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As its name implies, the Antakya Museum Hotel is an unlikely hybrid in its program and architecture. As to the latter, the structure combines prefabricated concrete blocks with steel—a lot of it.. Image Courtesy Cemal Emden

As its name implies, the Antakya Museum Hotel is an unlikely hybrid in its program and architecture. As to the latter, the structure combines prefabricated concrete blocks with steel—a lot of it.. Image Courtesy Cemal Emden

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine.

Designed by EAA–Emre Arolat Architecture, the 199-room hotel in Antakya, Turkey, features prefab modules slotted into a massive network of steel columns.





The urban surfaces we walk on, planed sidewalks cleared of debris or asphalt streets kept in good repair, are simply the topmost layers of human-churned earth extending sometimes hundreds of feet belowground. In some cities, digging downward exposes dense infrastructure networks, while in others—Antakya, Turkey, for one—construction workers can’t turn over a rock without uncovering priceless relics. The newly opened Antakya Museum Hotel, designed by the firm EAA–Emre Arolat Architecture, has turned one such discovery into a bold new strategy for historic preservation.

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