How Overwork and Anxiety Led Architect Ben Channon to Focus on Designing for Happiness

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/10/10367f4491f733d575b71966a5d35e39.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><p>Architect <a href="https://twitter.com/mindfularchi?lang=en" >Ben Channon</a> was finishing up his architectural qualifications when he began to realize the toll it was taking on his <a href="https://archinect.com/news/article/150063848/archinect-sessions-episode-121-mental-health-in-architecture" >mental health</a>. Overcome by anxiety, and living in a small shared flat, he was gripped by questions of why some buildings make us happy, while others do not. "At the end of the day, our environment affects us, whatever type of building it is," Channon says. His curiosity led him down a path investigating the links between <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/122656/mental-health" >architecture and well-being</a>. Channon's findings have culminated in the recent book,&nbsp;<em><a href="https://amzn.to/2D9qHNS" >Happy by Design</a></em>,&nbsp;where he asserts that the design of buildings can have large effects on the happiness of its inhabitants and offers advice on how to design spaces that better serve its users.&nbsp;</p>            

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