Stella Lee’s story calls for architecture to adopt a new movement

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/50/50f0487258b50225f6d55a129f95c4ed.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>Architectural education is plagued by the mentality that suffering is a necessary part of its practice. [...] The acceptance of suffering easily slips into normalizing sexual misconduct and its suppression as simply part of the practice. Cultlike worship of the star architect only exacerbates this condition, and there are plenty [...] willing to sacrifice their time and integrity because they have been conditioned to believe that this mode of production is normal.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The architecture world is known for many movements that have enabled architects to create iconic works. From bauhaus to brutalist, midcentury modern to contemporary, countless movements have impacted the architectural timeline. But in today's climate of inclusivity and representation is there one movement in particular that architecture is too slow to adopt?&nbsp;
Designing physical spaces that represent an artistic representation of form and function is something many architects strive for. However, have firms and institutions
their way when it comes to designing a space that evokes "an equitable working environment?" 
Bureau V team (left to right) Stella Lee, Peter Zuspan, Laura Trevino Image via BureauV
Stella Lee, architect and founding partner of the inclusive award-winning studio Bureau V, recently shared her experiences while working with Richard Meier. Having been accused of sexual misconduct it was announced in early this month that Meier would be stepping down from his lead...

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