Shenzhen’s elevated garden will bring pedestrians to the sky

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/21/2173d42f439b6c21a27ed7e2f6bc2b3a.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>&ldquo;Given the diversity of the buildings emerging within the Qianhai area, our preference was for a simple, bold, and confident insertion into the existing master plan,&rdquo; says Spence. &ldquo;The formality derives from the existing road grid and building plots, combined with our desire to maximize the area of raised green park linking the city to the bay. It creates a new horizon against which people can orientate.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>In the bustling city of Shenzen, the growing metropolis that bridges Hong Kong to <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/643/china" rel="nofollow" >China's</a> mainland, an exciting <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/226067/sky-garden" rel="nofollow" >sky garden</a> project will bring the city's transportation infrastructure to the sky. The team at&nbsp;Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners are creating a mile long elevated pathway. The main function of these elevated gardens, according to building developers, is to transition <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/666662/pedestrians" rel="nofollow" >pedestrians</a> from the ground level to <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/13491/skyscraper" rel="nofollow" >skyscrapers</a> in the city center.&nbsp;
Image via Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
Creating this separation of transit will allow for pedestrians to enjoy a much slower paced transit experience, leaving the levels below the sky gardens for commuters riding by train or car. The project is soon to be finished in 2020.

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