Desire paths as urban ‘civil disobedience’

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/c7/c7c0cfcad0eec0caf0f884e50ea67912.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em>Desire paths have been described as illustrating &ldquo;the tension between the native and the built environment and our relationship to them&rdquo;. Because they often form in areas where there are no pavements, they can be seen to &ldquo;indicate [the] yearning&rdquo; of those wishing to walk, a way for &ldquo;city dwellers to &lsquo;write back&rsquo; to city planners, giving feedback with their feet&rdquo;.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Ellie Violet Bramley pens an ode to "desire paths"&mdash;organically grown foot paths off the prescribed paved sidewalks; pedestrians' yearning for urban movement outside of the planned city order.
Example of an urban desire path getting paved in Chicago. Photo: Paul Sableman/Flickr.

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