The history and future of New York City’s streetlight system

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/8f/8f8488d1930bb53679e66834b7b6a09c.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=1200" border="0" /><em><p>New York&rsquo;s nightscape is as iconic [...] as it is taken for granted. A city without streetlights is impossible to imagine, but New York&rsquo;s 396,572&nbsp;street-side luminaires are as unremarkable as the streets&rsquo; paving &mdash; invisible until something changes. An initiative to replace sodium and halogen bulbs with energy- and cost-efficient LEDs has thrown the nightscape suddenly into question, as some city residents bemoan the loss of romance (and sleep).</p></em><br /><br /><p>In her piece for <em>Urban Omnibus</em>, landscape and urban designer&nbsp;Emily Schlickman takes a fascinating closer look at the history of New York City's system of street-side luminaires (the largest in the nation), and how the recent transition to <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/58845/led" rel="nofollow" >LED technology</a> is affecting the city and its residents&mdash;both people as well as nocturnal fauna.</p>         

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