Redesigning Las Vegas: Entertainment Architecture for the Experience Economy

            <img src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/1v/1v7txeos7y8ngsd8.gif" border="0" />While Las Vegas is as popular as ever, visitors are spending less time on the casino floor. According to a <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-04-05/report-las-vegas-draws-more-millennial-first-time-visitors" >recent report</a>, gambling time now totals 1.9 hours during an entire stay in Vegas, an hour less than in 2015 and over two hours less than twenty years ago. This change is being driven almost entirely by the younger generation who are spending just 8.5 percent of their income on gambling compared to the <a href="http://intraweb.stockton.edu/eyos/business/content/docs/LIGHT/Millenial%20Entertainment%20Preferences%20-%20FINAL%20REPORT.pdf" >23.5% spent by their parents</a>. The American entertainment industry has therefore made it a top priority to grab, and keep, the attention of the millennial market.
What does a less gambling-centric future mean for cities like Las Vegas? This month’s feature takes you on a virtual tour of The Strip to investigate a selection of new experience-driven, ‘Instagram-ready’ architecture projects commissioned by the top entertainment conglomerates. I check in with Stefan Al, and associate professor of Urban Design at the University of Pennsylvania and author of ‘The Strip: Las Veg...

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