Social housing goes green with another urban forest designed by Stefano Boeri

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/xo/xoocehqq9h6z1j5y.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/xo/xoocehqq9h6z1j5y.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/xo/xoocehqq9h6z1j5y.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/xo/xoocehqq9h6z1j5y.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" />A social housing project&nbsp;in the <a href="https://archinect.com/features/tag/75167/netherlands" rel="nofollow" >Netherlands</a> plans to adopt a <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/46091/vertical-forest" rel="nofollow" >Vertical Forest</a> designed by&nbsp;<a href="https://archinect.com/firms/cover/1644/stefano-boeri-architetti" rel="nofollow" >Stefano Boeri Architetti</a>. Now Eindhoven will join the list of Vertical Forest cities Milan,&nbsp;Nanjing, Utrecht, Tirana, Lausanne, and Paris.&nbsp;

The client, Sint-Trudo, has instigated the first Vertical Forest project to be used by low-income social groups—tackling climate change and housing shortages in one project. The building will have 125 social housing units within 19 floors of apartments, which will be rented out at affordable rates and include balconies with hundreds of trees and plants. 
Promoting sustainable architecture worldwide, the firm is committed to improving city environments for both the climate and its inhabitants. 

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