Neave Brown, social housing pioneer and 2018 RIBA Royal Gold Medal recipient, has passed away

            <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ga/gaqma6fma935xntx.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ga/gaqma6fma935xntx.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ga/gaqma6fma935xntx.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ga/gaqma6fma935xntx.jpg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" />Following a long battle with terminal lung cancer, the beloved architect <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/1025406/neave-brown" rel="nofollow" >Neave Brown</a> has passed away at the age of 88. Known for his modernist <a href="https://archinect.com/news/tag/731986/social-housing" rel="nofollow" >social housing</a>, Brown's projects are considered to be some of&nbsp;most innovative and successful low-cost housing schemes of the late 20th century with many of his complexes judged as some of the best places anywhere to live; Brown himself, even lived in one.&nbsp;
He also had, prior to his passing, been the only living architect to have all their works heritage listed. So, when RIBA announced back in October that they would be honoring Brown with their lifetime achievement award, the Royal Gold Medal—which he was nominated for by residents of his Alexandra Road scheme—the architecture community in the UK (and beyond) was delighted.  Many felt that Brown was deserving of this honor much earlier in his career; the award, and more the renewed interest in his work, was a rare optimistic moment last year, cheered by many. Brown had taken a step...

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